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Name: Frederick Augustus Phillips Determine relationship to...
Birth: 19 FEB 1869 Tuscumbia, Miller Co, MO Father: Clayton Seymore Phillips Mother:Elvira Golden
Christening:
Married: Minnie E. Mansfield 8 JAN 1893 Yakima Co, WA
Children Born Died
Bernice Aileen Phillips 28 OCT 1893 Mabton, Yakima, WA 16 AUG 1974 Baker City, Baker, OR (stroke)
Florence Ethel Phillips 5 AUG 1895 Mabton, Yakima, WA 5 JAN 1905 Baker City, Baker, OR
Wayne Everett Phillips 1 MAR 1898 Mabton, Yakima, WA 4 JUN 1968 Baker City, Baker, OR
Wendell Clayton Phillips 30 JAN 1901 Mabton, Yakima, WA 25 NOV 1901 Mabton, Yakima, WA
Married: Lula M. Powell 31 JAN 1904 Caldwell, Canyon Co, ID
Children Born Died
Paul Raymond Phillips 26 SEP 1906 Baker City, Baker, OR 23 AUG 1908 Baker City, Baker, OR
Death: 7 MAY 1964 Baker City, Baker, OR (heart attack at 95)
Burial: Mount Hope Cemetery, Baker City, Baker, OR
Remarks: The U. S. 1880 census, Glaize, Miller, MO, shows a Frederick A. Phillips, b. 1869 in MO, age 11, attending school, son of Clayton S. Phillips, b. in NH, mother b. in MO.

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Great grandfather Phillips lived until I was 17 years old and I knew him well. He was well respected in his communtiy. My two sisters boarded with him during the winter months so that they could participate in after school activities during their high scool years. The bus ride from our ranch in Keating (17 miles out of Baker) started at 6:30 AM and ended at 5PM when we were delivered back home. By the time I was in high school, my grandparents (Ira & Bernice) lived in Baker, so I stayed with them.

Fred settled in Washington territory (initially Douglas County, but soon homesteaded in Mabton-near Yakima, Washington) in 1887 along with his father and 5 brother/sisters. When his father died in 1888, he was the head of the family. He hired himself and a mule team out to a logging operation for $10 a day while the younger children maintained the homestead. Food was always a probelm. Aunt Myrtle said that they refused charity from the other homesteaders and insisted on doing laundry for anyone who gave them food/clothing (probably the people who got their clothes laundered had to relaunder the clothing to get it clean). Only the Indians would give them true charity. The children would come out the front door in the morning and occasionaly find a quarter of venison laying by the steps that the Indians had left for them.

Grandad Phillips was co-founder of the Oregon Cattleman's Association. His name is hanging in the Cowboy Hall of Fame, Oklahoma City as one of the three Honor Roll cattlemen from the state of Oregon.

Fred started in the cattle business as a buyer of cattle from the Indians. He spoke fluent Yakima/Umatilla Indian and taught my sister Linda many phrases. His last words before he died were in Indian. Grandmother Bernice went with him as a young girl to stay in the Indian camp while he conducted business. Her memories were not pleasant as the smell was horrendous (having visited some third world countries where sewage was "open", I can imagine).

Fred had a chain of butcher shops in Eastern Oregon and Washington before going into the ranching business. He moved to Baker, Oregon about 1900. His wife Minnie was dying of the consumption (tuberculosis). After her death, he remarried Lula, in order to take care of the children. Lula immediately sent the kids off to boarding school (Annie Wright Seminary, Tacoma, WA in Grandmother Bernice's case). Grandmother never called Lula mother, we always called her "Aunt" Lula.

Grandad Phillips was active until he died at 95. He was president of the Baker Production Credit Association, which was a lending institution for farmers which had been set up by the US Government during the depression. Grandad was one of the people who helped found the PCA nationwide.

After Grandad Phillips death, we found a letter in his basement from a Washington DC attorney addressed to him as "Fred Phillips, Washington Territory". Obviously the letter was delivered to him. Can you imagine a letter delivered across country today when you just put the name of the individual and the state?

Jim Weber

------------------------------ancestry of Fred Phillips-----------------

The information that I have on the ancestry of Fred Phillips is extensive, primarily due to the efforts of two cousins: Martha Wright Matthews of Yakima, WA and Beverly Marston of Keene, NH. Martha had collected all of the information on descendants of Joseph Phillips, who were born in Miller Co, MO. So all of the information on the Western U.S. cousins is due to her long hours spent on family genealogy. Martha knew that Joseph was born in NH and advertised in a newspaper there for ancestors of Joseph Phillips. A friend of Beverly Marston read the ad and told Beverly. Thus the connection to the New England heritage was established. Beverly had become the keeper of our arm of the Phillips family in New England some time after WWII. She belongs to the local genalogy society and is a stickler for accuracy and standards. Beverly had traced nearly all of the branches of the Phillips family in New England back to the original immigrants, most of whom were in the early 1600's. Having been raised in the West, anything in the 1800's is considered really old! Imagine my surprise to find most of the Phillips line traced back so far. Beverly had also traced certain branches back to King Alfred the Great and William the Conqueror.

In the year that I have been involved with Martha and Beverly, we have added the Chloe Shattuck and Freelove Payne connections. I have also added some ancestry for Michael Phillips which Martha found on the internet, although the ancestry is far from proven. Beverly and Martha consider it too speculative to put in their ancestry. Beverly even considers Freelove Payne to be not "totally proven", although she admits that Freelove is "probably" an ancestor.

Martha and Beverly have been wonderful to work with. My contribution is expanding the base North American ancestry through computer searches and source books, adding a lot of English noble ancestry, putting it in a computer program (Family Tree Maker), and putting it on World Connect. I have done practically no original research on the Phillips side of the family. Thanks to Beverly and Martha it was all done for me.

Jim Weber