Search     Ancestors     Map     Descendants     Load Gedcom file
Name: Henry De Percy Determine relationship to...
Birth: 10 NOV 1341 Father: Henry De Percy Mother:Mary Plantagenet
Christening:
Married: Maud De Lacy
Children Born Died
Married: Margaret De Neville
Children Born Died
Ralph De Percy ABT 1368 1399
Henry " Hotspur" De Percy 20 MAY 1364 21 JUL 1403
Thomas De Percy ABT 1366 AUG 1388
Margaret De Percy ABT 1352 DECEASED
Isolde De Percy ABT 1362 DECEASED
Alan De Percy ABT 1360 DECEASED
Death: 19 FEB 1406/1407
Burial:
Remarks: Henry de Percy, 4th Lord Percy, of Alnwick, a distinguished military commander in the righn of Edward III, who, assisting as marshal of England at the coronation of King richard II, was advanced on the same day, 6 July, 1377, to the Earldom of Northumberland, with remainder to his heirs generally, and, like a barony in fee, transmissible, it would appear, to female as well as male heirs. He m. 1st, 1358, Margaret, dau. of Ralph, Lord Nevil, Ro Raby, and had issue. Henry, Thomas, Ralph, Alan, and Margaret. The earl m. 2ndly, Maud, sister and heir of Anthony, Lord Lucy, which Anthony settled upon his lordship and his heirs, the honour and castle of Cockermouth with other great estates, on condition that her arms should be forever quarterd with those of the Percys. In the 7th year of Richard II [1384], the earl having been elected one of the knights of the Garter, the king bestowed upon him the robes of the order out of the royal wardrobe. In some years afterwards, however, being proclaimed a traitor, and his land declared forfeited by King Richard, his lordship, in conjunction with his son, Sir Henry Percy, surnamed Hotspur, and Henry, Duke of Lancaster, accomplished the dethronement of that monarch and placed the crown upon the head of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, under the title of Henry IV. In requital, the king gave Percy the Isle of Man, by the tenure of carrying in the left hand the sword (which he wore when he landed in Holderness) at the coronation of himself and his successors. Against dissatisfied with the governemnt, the ducke is charged with concerting the rebellion, in which his son, Hotspur, and his brother, the Earl of Worcester, engaged, in 1403, for transferring the sceptre to Mortimer, Earl of March, then a boy. Of these two eminent persons, Sir Henry Percy, the renowned Hotspur, fell performing prodigies of valour, at Battle-field, near Shrewsbury, 21 July, 1403, and Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, was beheaded after the battle at Shrewsbury. The Earl of Northumberland fell subsequently (29 February, 1407-8), in arms against the king, at Bramham Moor, nearl Haslewood, when his honour became forfeited under an attainder, but were restored, in 1414, to his grandson (Hotspur's only son), Henry de Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, pp. 423-4, Percy, Barons Percy, Earls of Northumberland, &c.]

Henry de Percy, 1st and last Earl of Northumberland of the 16 July 1377 creation, KG (c1366); born 10 Nov 1341; knighted Feb 1361/2, Jt (his father being among other appointees to the post) surveyor of Eastern March of Scotland and Keeper of truce with Scots 1367, Jt Warden of the Easter March 1369 and 1370; Jt commissioner to negotiate peace with the Scots 1378, 1393 and Feb 1393/4 and Jt Ambassador for the same purpose 1401, Admiral of the North 1383, Sheriff of Northumberland 1383, Captain of Calais 1389, Jt Ambassador to negotiate truce with Flanders and France 1390, Keeper of Berwick and East March 1391-96; following some two decades of growing dissatisfaction with Richard II he played a major role in deposing and probably also in the subsequent murder of the King, as also the process whereby the 2nd Duke of Lancaster ascended the throne as Henry IV, so that on the latter's coronation day (30 Sep 1399) he was appointed Constable of England for life (forfeited 1403) and about the same time was granted the lordship of the Isle of Man; won with his son "Harry Hotspur" victory of Homildon Hill over Scots 1402 but father and son were not allowed to ransom their prisoners by Henry IV and what with that and other causes of irritation they conspired to put the 5th Earl of March on the throne, who as great grandson of Lionel Duke of Clarence, 2nd son of Edward III, was the candidate of the late Richard II's supporters and indeed de jure successor to Richard; following the Battle of Shrewsbury (1403), in which "Harry Hotspur" was killed, the Earl of Northumberland made his peace with Henry IV, his actions being adjudged trespass rather than treason; he conspired against Henry again in 1405 and fled abroad, whereupon he was attainted 1406 and the Earldom of Northumberland and Barony of Percy were forfeited; married 1st 12 July 1358 Margaret de Neville (died 11-13 May 1372), daughter of 2nd Lord (Baron) Nevill(e) (of Raby), and widow of 3rd Lord (Baron) de Ros of Helmsley.

Henry married 2nd by 15 Dec 1381, as her 2nd husband, Maud de Lucy, Baroness Lucy in her own right (born c1343-45; married 1st Gilbert de Umfreville, 10th Earl of Angus; dsps 18 Dec 1398), sister and heiress of Anthony, 3rd Lord (Baron) Lucy; in the event of her dying without issue, which is what actually happened, she bequeathed to her stepson Sir Henry ("Harry Hotspur") Percy her estates, including the Honour and Castle of Cockermouth, Cumberland. The 1st and last Earl of Northumberland of the 1377 creation (as it will be convenient still to call him, although he had by now been stripped of his titles), convinced that Henry IV was widely detested and that the pro-March party would quickly pick up support, headed south with a band of followers into England from the Scottish border in Feb 1408 but was intercepted at Tadcaster, Yorks, 19 Feb 1407/8 and defeated and killed in battle at Bramham Moor nearby 20 Feb, his head being struck off, removed and fixed on a stake at London Bridge, while his body was divided in four, a separate part being sent to London, Lincoln, Berwick, and Newcastle to edify the population though Henry IV later gave the remains to the late Earl's friends for decent burial. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------

Henry de Percy, KG, created 1377 Earl of Northumberland, b. 10 Nov 1341, slain 19 Feb 1407/8, son of Henry de Percy and Mary Plantagenet, daughter of Henry de Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. [Magna Charta Sureties]

-------------------------------------------

Henry de Percy, 4th Lord Percy, of Alnwick, a distinguished military commander in the reign of Edward III, who, assisting as marshal of England at the coronation of King richard II, was advanced on the same day, 6 July, 1377, to the Earldom of Northumberland, with remainder to his heirs generally, and, like a barony in fee, transmissible, it would appear, to female as well as male heirs. He m. 1st, 1358, Margaret, dau. of Ralph, Lord Nevil, Ro Raby, and had issue. Henry, Thomas, Ralph, Alan, and Margaret. The earl m. 2ndly, Maud, sister and heir of Anthony, Lord Lucy, which Anthony settled upon his lordship and his heirs, the honour and castle of Cockermouth with other great estates, on condition that her arms should be forever quarterd with those of the Percys. In the 7th year of Richard II [1384], the earl having been elected one of the knights of the Garter, the king bestowed upon him the robes of the order out of the royal wardrobe. In some years afterwards, however, being proclaimed a traitor, and his land declared forfeited by King Richard, his lordship, in conjunction with his son, Sir Henry Percy, surnamed Hotspur, and Henry, Duke of Lancaster, accomplished the dethronement of that monarch and placed the crown upon the head of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, under the title of Henry IV. In requital, the king gave Percy the Isle of Man, by the tenure of carrying in the left hand the sword (which he wore when he landed in Holderness) at the coronation of himself and his successors. Against dissatisfied with the governemnt, the duke is charged with concerting the rebellion, in which his son, Hotspur, and his brother, the Earl of Worcester, engaged, in 1403, for transferring the sceptre to Mortimer, Earl of March, then a boy. Of these two eminent persons, Sir Henry Percy, the renowned Hotspur, fell performing prodigies of valour, at Battle-field, near Shrewsbury, 21 July, 1403, and Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, was beheaded after the battle at Shrewsbury. The Earl of Northumberland fell subsequently (29 February, 1407-8), in arms against the king, at Bramham Moor, nearl Haslewood, when his honour became forfeited under an attainder, but were restored, in 1414, to his grandson (Hotspur's only son), Henry de Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, pp. 423-4, Percy, Barons Percy, Earls of Northumberland, &c.][JohnFaye (8 Jun 05).FTW]

Henry de Percy, 4th Lord Percy, of Alnwick, a distinguished military commander in the righn of Edward III, who, assisting as marshal of England at the coronation of King richard II, was advanced on the same day, 6 July, 1377, to the Earldom of Northumberland, with remainder to his heirs generally, and, like a barony in fee, transmissible, it would appear, to female as well as male heirs. He m. 1st, 1358, Margaret, dau. of Ralph, Lord Nevil, Ro Raby, and had issue. Henry, Thomas, Ralph, Alan, and Margaret. The earl m. 2ndly, Maud, sister and heir of Anthony, Lord Lucy, which Anthony settled upon his lordship and his heirs, the honour and castle of Cockermouth with other great estates, on condition that her arms should be forever quarterd with those of the Percys. In the 7th year of Richard II [1384], the earl having been elected one of the knights of the Garter, the king bestowed upon him the robes of the order out of the royal wardrobe. In some years afterwards, however, being proclaimed a traitor, and his land declared forfeited by King Richard, his lordship, in conjunction with his son, Sir Henry Percy, surnamed Hotspur, and Henry, Duke of Lancaster, accomplished the dethronement of that monarch and placed the crown upon the head of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, under the title of Henry IV. In requital, the king gave Percy the Isle of Man, by the tenure of carrying in the left hand the sword (which he wore when he landed in Holderness) at the coronation of himself and his successors. Against dissatisfied with the governemnt, the ducke is charged with concerting the rebellion, in which his son, Hotspur, and his brother, the Earl of Worcester, engaged, in 1403, for transferring the sceptre to Mortimer, Earl of March, then a boy. Of these two eminent persons, Sir Henry Percy, the renowned Hotspur, fell performing prodigies of valour, at Battle-field, near Shrewsbury, 21 July, 1403, and Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, was beheaded after the battle at Shrewsbury. The Earl of Northumberland fell subsequently (29 February, 1407-8), in arms against the king, at Bramham Moor, nearl Haslewood, when his honour became forfeited under an attainder, but were restored, in 1414, to his grandson (Hotspur's only son), Henry de Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, pp. 423-4, Percy, Barons Percy, Earls of Northumberland, &c.]

Henry de Percy, 1st and last Earl of Northumberland of the 16 July 1377 creation, KG (c1366); born 10 Nov 1341; knighted Feb 1361/2, Jt (his father being among other appointees to the post) surveyor of Eastern March of Scotland and Keeper of truce with Scots 1367, Jt Warden of the Easter March 1369 and 1370; Jt commissioner to negotiate peace with the Scots 1378, 1393 and Feb 1393/4 and Jt Ambassador for the same purpose 1401, Admiral of the North 1383, Sheriff of Northumberland 1383, Captain of Calais 1389, Jt Ambassador to negotiate truce with Flanders and France 1390, Keeper of Berwick and East March 1391-96; following some two decades of growing dissatisfaction with Richard II he played a major role in deposing and probably also in the subsequent murder of the King, as also the process whereby the 2nd Duke of Lancaster ascended the throne as Henry IV, so that on the latter's coronation day (30 Sep 1399) he was appointed Constable of England for life (forfeited 1403) and about the same time was granted the lordship of the Isle of Man; won with his son "Harry Hotspur" victory of Homildon Hill over Scots 1402 but father and son were not allowed to ransom their prisoners by Henry IV and what with that and other causes of irritation they conspired to put the 5th Earl of March on the throne, who as great grandson of Lionel Duke of Clarence, 2nd son of Edward III, was the candidate of the late Richard II's supporters and indeed de jure successor to Richard; following the Battle of Shrewsbury (1403), in which "Harry Hotspur" was killed, the Earl of Northumberland made his peace with Henry IV, his actions being adjudged trespass rather than treason; he conspired against Henry again in 1405 and fled abroad, whereupon he was attainted 1406 and the Earldom of Northumberland and Barony of Percy were forfeited; married 1st 12 July 1358 Margaret de Neville (died 11-13 May 1372), daughter of 2nd Lord (Baron) Nevill(e) (of Raby), and widow of 3rd Lord (Baron) de Ros of Helmsley.

Henry married 2nd by 15 Dec 1381, as her 2nd husband, Maud de Lucy, Baroness Lucy in her own right (born c1343-45; married 1st Gilbert de Umfreville, 10th Earl of Angus; dsps 18 Dec 1398), sister and heiress of Anthony, 3rd Lord (Baron) Lucy; in the event of her dying without issue, which is what actually happened, she bequeathed to her stepson Sir Henry ("Harry Hotspur") Percy her estates, including the Honour and Castle of Cockermouth, Cumberland. The 1st and last Earl of Northumberland of the 1377 creation (as it will be convenient still to call him, although he had by now been stripped of his titles), convinced that Henry IV was widely detested and that the pro-March party would quickly pick up support, headed south with a band of followers into England from the Scottish border in Feb 1408 but was intercepted at Tadcaster, Yorks, 19 Feb 1407/8 and defeated and killed in battle at Bramham Moor nearby 20 Feb, his head being struck off, removed and fixed on a stake at London Bridge, while his body was divided in four, a separate part being sent to London, Lincoln, Berwick, and Newcastle to edify the population though Henry IV later gave the remains to the late Earl's friends for decent burial. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------

Henry de Percy, KG, created 1377 Earl of Northumberland, b. 10 Nov 1341, slain 19 Feb 1407/8, son of Henry de Percy and Mary Plantagenet, daughter of Henry de Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. [Magna Charta Sureties]

-------------------------------------------

Henry de Percy, 4th Lord Percy, of Alnwick, a distinguished military commander in the reign of Edward III, who, assisting as marshal of England at the coronation of King richard II, was advanced on the same day, 6 July, 1377, to the Earldom of Northumberland, with remainder to his heirs generally, and, like a barony in fee, transmissible, it would appear, to female as well as male heirs. He m. 1st, 1358, Margaret, dau. of Ralph, Lord Nevil, Ro Raby, and had issue. Henry, Thomas, Ralph, Alan, and Margaret. The earl m. 2ndly, Maud, sister and heir of Anthony, Lord Lucy, which Anthony settled upon his lordship and his heirs, the honour and castle of Cockermouth with other great estates, on condition that her arms should be forever quarterd with those of the Percys. In the 7th year of Richard II [1384], the earl having been elected one of the knights of the Garter, the king bestowed upon him the robes of the order out of the royal wardrobe. In some years afterwards, however, being proclaimed a traitor, and his land declared forfeited by King Richard, his lordship, in conjunction with his son, Sir Henry Percy, surnamed Hotspur, and Henry, Duke of Lancaster, accomplished the dethronement of that monarch and placed the crown upon the head of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, under the title of Henry IV. In requital, the king gave Percy the Isle of Man, by the tenure of carrying in the left hand the sword (which he wore when he landed in Holderness) at the coronation of himself and his successors. Against dissatisfied with the governemnt, the duke is charged with concerting the rebellion, in which his son, Hotspur, and his brother, the Earl of Worcester, engaged, in 1403, for transferring the sceptre to Mortimer, Earl of March, then a boy. Of these two eminent persons, Sir Henry Percy, the renowned Hotspur, fell performing prodigies of valour, at Battle-field, near Shrewsbury, 21 July, 1403, and Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, was beheaded after the battle at Shrewsbury. The Earl of Northumberland fell subsequently (29 February, 1407-8), in arms against the king, at Bramham Moor, nearl Haslewood, when his honour became forfeited under an attainder, but were restored, in 1414, to his grandson (Hotspur's only son), Henry de Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, pp. 423-4, Percy, Barons Percy, Earls of Northumberland, &c.]


Database: stanwardine   Bridge Family Tree
Contact: William Bridge   williambridge@stanwardine.com   www.stanwardine.com