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Name: Tiberius Gemellus Determine relationship to...
Birth: 19 AD Father: Tiberius Drusus Caesar (Castor) Mother: Livilla
Christening:
Death: 37/38 AD ( murdered on Caligula's orders)
Burial:
Remarks: Gemellus was a twin, whose brother predeceased him. On Emperor Tiberius's death on 16 March, A.D. 37, Gaius (Caligula) came to power with the support of the Praetorian Prefect, Macro. When Tiberius's will was read in the senate, it contained a surprise: the nomination of Gemellus as chief co-heir with Gaius. [4] This act catapulted Gemellus to the fore and probably cost him his life. Gaius moved swiftly to negate the threat. He had Tiberius's will nullified (on what legal basis is unknown) and was, initially, placatory in his dealings with his cousin. He adopted Gemellus as his son and had him declared princeps iuventutis, both procedures long since reserved for favored princes in line to succeed reigning emperors. However, by the end of the year, or early in A.D. 38, Gemellus was murdered on Gaius's orders. [5] His short life amply illustrates how the ill-defined legal position of the Augustan princeps and the uncertain modes of nominating successors employed by the emperors proved fatal for so many members of the Julio-Claudian family.

Gemellus was a twin, whose brother predeceased him. On Emperor Tiberius's death on 16 March, A.D. 37, Gaius (Caligula) came to power with the support of the Praetorian Prefect, Macro. When Tiberius's will was read in the senate, it contained a surprise: the nomination of Gemellus as chief co-heir with Gaius. [4] This act catapulted Gemellus to the fore and probably cost him his life. Gaius moved swiftly to negate the threat. He had Tiberius's will nullified (on what legal basis is unknown) and was, initially, placatory in his dealings with his cousin. He adopted Gemellus as his son and had him declared princeps iuventutis, both procedures long since reserved for favored princes in line to succeed reigning emperors. However, by the end of the year, or early in A.D. 38, Gemellus was murdered on Gaius's orders. [5] His short life amply illustrates how the ill-defined legal position of the Augustan princeps and the uncertain modes of nominating successors employed by the emperors proved fatal for so many members of the Julio-Claudian family.

Gemellus was a twin, whose brother predeceased him. On Emperor Tiberius's death on 16 March, A.D. 37, Gaius (Caligula) came to power with the support of the Praetorian Prefect, Macro. When Tiberius's will was read in the senate, it contained a surprise: the nomination of Gemellus as chief co-heir with Gaius. [4] This act catapulted Gemellus to the fore and probably cost him his life. Gaius moved swiftly to negate the threat. He had Tiberius's will nullified (on what legal basis is unknown) and was, initially, placatory in his dealings with his cousin. He adopted Gemellus as his son and had him declared princeps iuventutis, both procedures long since reserved for favored princes in line to succeed reigning emperors. However, by the end of the year, or early in A.D. 38, Gemellus was murdered on Gaius's orders. [5] His short life amply illustrates how the ill-defined legal position of the Augustan princeps and the uncertain modes of nominating successors employed by the emperors proved fatal for so many members of the Julio-Claudian family.


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