Malvern College First World War Casualties

Statue of St George which is inscribed 'To Our Brothers', and oak panel memorial inside the chapel.

The following is a list with biographies of the 459 people who attended Malvern College and died due to the First World War. Altogether 2,833 are known to have served. There is also a corresponding page commemorating the 248 casualties in the Second World War.
There was not a month from August 1914 to November 1918 that an Old Malvernian did not become a casualty, with 6 killed on the first day of the Battle of Loos on the 25th September 1915 and 13 killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on the 1st July 1916.
The vast majority of casualties occurred in France and Belgium with 31 names recorded on the Menin Gate at Ypres, and 23 at Thiepval. There were also 23 casualties in Turkey due to the Gallipoli Campaign, and 16 in Iraq, including 2 near Kut.
They were in a wide range of regiments including 26 in the Royal Field Artillery, 13 in the Royal Engineers, 12 in the Worcestershire Regt, 11 in the Canadian Inf, 11 in the East Kent Regt (The Buffs), and 5 in the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force.
Most were officers with 133 Captains, 125 2nd Lieutenants, 114 Lieutenants, 26 Majors, and 15 Lieutenant Colonels.
22 received the MC, 5 the DSO and 1 the DCM, as well as 3 knighthoods (the CB, CMG, and MVO).

The information below is based primarily on the memorial books held at Malvern College which Ian Quickfall, and now Paul Godsland, the Malvernian Society archivists, have arranged to be digitised with the official memorial web site still in development.
Further information was also obtained from 'The Malvern College Register 1865-1924' edited by H.G.C Salmon, 'The Malvernian' school magazine, 'A History of Malvern College 1865 to 1965' by Ralph Blumenau, and 'Malvern College: A 150th Anniversary Portrait' by Roy Allen.
Information was also obtained from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, the Unit War Diaries and Service Records held at the National Archives in Kew, and various online commemorative websites whose links have been provided.

The main battles have tried to be identified in which Old Malvernians died in. Many though were killed in the general attrition of Trench Warfare which is so vividly described in the book 'Nothing of Importance' by Bernard Adams.

Below is a map showing the locations of the 240 cemeteries where Old Malvernians are buried or commemorated in. The markers are coloured yellow for one casualty, orange for between 2 and 9, and red for 10 or more. The name of the cemetery and number of casualties can be seen by hovering over the marker, and the list of names seen by clicking on the marker. Their full biographies and pictures can be seen by clicking on 'Further Info'.

The records can be filtered and/or sorted by name, house, age, regiment, battle, date, place etc by clicking on the appropriate drop down box and then the 'Search' button below the map. The original memorial book entry can be seen by clicking on the person's picture.

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Records

Photo of Eric Goward Abbott
2nd Lieut Eric Goward Abbott
House: No 9, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 16 March 1917 aged 25 in France. Killed in action near Gommecourt.
Cemetery: Foncquevillers 11.E.14

Born 25 Oct 1892. Son of Julie Emma Abbott, of The Austins, Handsworth, Birmingham, and the late Councillor & Chartered Accountant Edward James Abbott .
Lower IV—Matriculation Class.
Articled to a Chartered Accountant.
"A" Coy. 1st/5th Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment

'At the beginning of the war he was studying as an articled pupil for qualification as a Chartered Accountant. In September 1915 he obtained a commission in one of the Territorial Battalions of the S. Staffs. Regt. On March 16th he was reported as wounded and missing, and subsequently as killed. His warm hearted, kindly nature won for him many friends both at School and afterwards. A recent letter from him shows the keen interest he always felt in the doings of his School and House.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Some sixty books were presented to the Grundy Library by C. E. Abbott (O.M.), in memory of his brother.

There is a life size bronze figure of him at rest in full uniform at St James Church, Handsworth, Birmingham, with the inscription:
“TO SAVE THE WORLD HE GAVE HIS LIFE AND THAT TO US IS EVERYTHING”.Ref

Medal Card: WO 372/1/1440
Service record: WO 374/20
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2686/1

Photo of John Bernard Pye Adams
Captain John Bernard Pye Adams
House: No 8, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Welch Fus..
Died: 27 February 1917 aged 27 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Couin New British Cemetery B.3.

Son of Harold John and Georgina Adams, of St. John's, Oakwood Avenue, Beckenham, Kent.
Upper V—VI. House Scholar. Lea Shakespeare ; Greek Prose ; Latin Essay ; Beauchamp Divinity ; Ingleby Prize ; Leaving Scholarship. School Prefect. Head of House.
Scholar, St. John's College, Cambridge ; B.A. (First Class Class. Tripos Part I) 1912 ; Third Class Economics Tripos Part II 1913 ; Browne's Medals for Latin Ode 1911 ; Greek Epigram 1911,12.
Assistant to Educational Adviser and Warden of House for Indian Students in London.
1st Bn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

'He joined up as Lieutenant in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in November, 1914, and was out at the front, acting latterly as temporary Captain from October 1915 to June 1916, when he was wounded and came home. He returned to the Front only last February, and died of wounds received on the 27th. Seriousness of purpose, a strong sense of duty, unselfishness and a charming modesty concerning his achievements were marked characteristics of Bernard Adams and won for him the respect and affection of those who came in contact with him. His blameless record, high ideals and thorough loyalty could not fail to influence those among whom he lived, and his House, especially, owes very much to him. At Cambridge he threw himself eagerly and with the keenest enjoyment into all that is best in 'Varsity life. A College friend wrote of him: "Bernard will always be an inspiration to me, connected with the purest and highest ideals a man can have." As regards his work among Indian Students his Chief (Dr. T. W. Arnold, CLE.) writes : "He had endeared himself to all of us at 21 Cromwell Road, and I shall always remember with gratitude the years during which I was associated with him in a work he had so much at heart. It was not an easy task . . . . and his sense of duty carried him through and helped to encourage his colleagues." A fellow officer, writing of the action in which Adams fell, after mentioning acts of self-denial and thoughtfulness for others, says: "Of one thing I am fully convinced, and that is that the success of the attack was mainly due to his glorious bravery. It was great, and his deeds and bravery were to me a great tonic, and therefore must have been the same to all who saw them I shall never forget his magnificent bravery."' (Malvernian, Apr 1917).
During his convalescence in the second half of 1916, he wrote about his experiences in the trenches in a very detailed and vivid manner in the book 'Nothing of importance'. It can be read online here

He returned to the front in January 1917 and a few weeks later he was severely wounded leading his men in an attack on Serre on the 26th February and died the following day in hospital. His fellow officers included 2nd Lieutenant Siegrfried Sassoon who according to the Unit War Diary was 'struck off' on the same day. Siegrfried Sassoon while at Craiglockart Hospital gave Wilfred Owen his annotated copy of 'Nothing of Importance' when he heard that Owen was going back to the front in October 1917. The book is now in the 'Wilfred Owen Collection' at the Weston Library, part of the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Sassoon wrote on the fly leaf that he is referred to as Scott in the book.The full annotations made by Siegrfried Sassoon can be seen here


The Daily Telegraph wrote the following review of the book: "With exemplary modesty the title of this book completely belies its contents. So far from containing "nothing of importance," it will rank, beyond question, among the most significant records which the war has produced. For it is a work of the rarest vividness and distinction; and at every turn it is marked by a radiantly sincere determination to tell the truth about things which have generally been grossly distorted by sentiment and cant. Nothing more real or more poignant has been written about the war, while a quiet sense of humour, playing over the narrative, continually keeps the writer upon the safe side of exaggeration. This is a book that all stay-at-homes should read with deliberation; its success among the active combatants is assured from the outset. For they alone are in a position to appreciate its clarity and truth ."
Biography at livesofthefirstworldwar and at forgottenpoetsofww1 and at back of his book.

Service record: WO 339/14873
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1665/1

Photo of Charles John Henry Adamson
Captain Charles John Henry Adamson
House: No 5, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 20 September 1917 aged 27 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P 19/23 and 162

Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Adamson, of Kirkhill, Northumberland; husband of Georgiana Adamson, of The Quest, Ponteland, Northumberland.
Middle IV—Army II. House Prefect. XXII Football.
Engineer.
Captain 6th Batt. Northumberland Fusiliers (T.F.) 1912 ; resigned 1913.
Great War, Private H.A.C. 1914 ; Captain 11th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers .

'On leaving School he went as a pupil to The Hon. Sir Charles Parson's Electrical Engineering Works in Newcastle-on-Tyne, and at the same time joined the 6th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers (Territorials), and left as Captain after about three years' service. He then went to London to work for the firm. He enlisted in the H.A.C. at the outbreak of war, and was given a commission in the N.F. in October 1914. He was sent to France in August 1916, to join his Battalion. He fell leading his men in the attack on September 20th. He married Georgiana, daughter of the late Canon Walker, of Whalton, on October 31st, 1914.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Service Record: WO 339/20316
Medal Card: WO 372/1/20315
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2182/4 (1915 Aug - 1917 Oct)

Photo of Richard Paterson Agar
2nd Lieut Richard Paterson Agar
House: No 6, 1909 - 1915. Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders.
Died: 14 October 1916 aged 20 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Guards Cemetery Les Boeufs V111. D. 3.

Born: 11th July 1896 at 10 Montgomery Terrace, Ayr.
Father: William Morison Paterson (Dress Goods Manufacturer).
Mother: Margaret Swale Paterson (M.S. Agar)
Adopted son of R. Agar, Edgecombe Hall, Wimbledon Park, S.W. b. 1896.
Lower IV—Science I. School Prefect; House XI Football;
Cadet Officer.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 2nd Bn. Seaforth Highlanders 1916.

At enlistment in May 1915, lived at Edgecombe Hall, Beaumont St, Wimbledon Park, London.
Brother: James A Paterson was killed near Ypres on October 30th 1914.

'After passing through Sandhurst he was gazetted to the Seaforth Highlanders, and went out to France on July 18th, where he was killed in action on October 14th. His cheerful and generous nature endeared him to all his contemporaries at School, and many boys owed much to his kindly and thoughtful influence.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

War Diary:
"He and his company were endeavouring to attain Dewdrop Trench, he was killed by very heavy machine gun fire while being driven back to Rainy Trench."
War Diary says that "he was a splendid officer and his death is a great loss to the Battalion".Ref

Service Record: WO 339/57485Extracts

Medal Card: WO 372/1/26326
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1483/5 (1916 July 1 - 1916 Dec 31)

Photo of Arthur William Agg
Lieutenant Arthur William Agg
House: Sch, 1878 - 1881. Regiment: Recruiting Officer.
Died: 02 April 1916 aged 51 in United Kingdom. Died after operation.
Cemetery: Whittington Glos. On East boundary

Son of Colonel W. Agg, The Hewletts, Cheltenham. b. 1865.
III—Modern II.
Lieut. 6th Worcestershire Regt. (Militia) ; Great War, Lieut.,
Recruiting Officer. Died April 2, 1916.

'We are indebted to the Gloucestershire Echo for the following : "Lieut. Agg was at one time a Lieutenant in the 6th (Militia) battalion Worcestershire Regiment. For two years (1902- 4) he sat as a member of the Prestbury Parish Council. Later he moved to Andoversford, where he interested himself in the Boy Scout movement, and became Commandant of that division of the Scouts. He took up the duties of Recruiting Officer for the Cheltenham and North Gloucestershire district in October 1914. He died after an operation for appendicitis on April 2nd.''' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Photo of Bertram Kyrle Anderson
Bombardier. Bertram Kyrle Anderson
House: No 6, 1898 - 1899. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 08 June 1917 aged 34 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of Messines. Cemetery: Erquinghem-Lys Churchyard Extension 11 C 2

Father: William Robert Le Guyt Anderson, C.B., Rawal Pindi, India,
Mother: Emilie Frances Anderson
Christened: 23 Jan 1884, Holy Trinity, Rugby

Service Number 675725
Died 06/06/1917
"C" Bty. 285th Bde.
Royal Field Artillery

Photo of Colin Knox Anderson
Lieutenant Colin Knox Anderson
House: No 7, 1903 - 1908. Regiment: Royal West Kent Regt..
Died: 23 August 1914 aged 26 in Belgium. Killed in action at Mons.
Battle: Battle of Mons. Cemetery: Hautrage Military Cemetery 1 D 17

Son of George Knox Anderson, D.L., J.P., and Mrs. Anderson, of Bridge Hill House, Canterbury, Kent.
Middle IV B—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. XI Cricket; XXII Football.
In business.
Lieutenant 3rd Batt. Royal West Kent Regt. 1911.
Great War, mobilised 1914. 3rd Bn. attd. "A" Coy. 1st Bn. Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment).

'His simplicity of character, unfailing high spirits, and enthusiastic enjoyment of whatever was in hand at the moment made him one of the best of comrades. His nature came out clearly in his cricket, for he was one of those bowlers—and he bowled fast—who would never ask for a rest, and a batsman who always hoped to hit the ball for six. He had recently gone into business, and had made an excellent start in it. At the beginning of the War he was attached to the 2nd Batt. Royal West Kent Regiment. He fell at Mons.' (Malvernian, Nov 1914)

During the Battle of Mons, his company was ordered to cover the withdrawal of the cavalry patrols and crossed the Mons-Conde Canal.
Heavily outnumbered, almost half of his company were hit of which 2/3rds were killed or 'missing'.
He was shot through the head and was left behind when the retirement was called and was buried by the Germans.
Biography


Led by Lions: MPs and Sons Who Fell in the First World War By Neil Thornton

InvisionZone
Livesofthefirstworldwar

Photo of George Lechmere Anson
Captain George Lechmere Anson
House: No 6, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: Sherwood Foresters.
Died: 02 October 1914 aged 31 in Belgium. Killed in action at Ennetieres.
Cemetery: Ploegsteert Memorial P 7

Son of Edith Ann Anson, and the late Col. George Hamilton Anson,Speen, Newbury, b. 1883.
Lower Modern III—Lower Modern II.
4th Sherwood Foresters (Reserve Batt.) ; Captain 1907.
2nd Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment)

'A boy of peculiar charm, he displayed in his military career all those qualities which had made him universally popular at Malvern. He joined the Sherwood Foresters, obtaining his captaincy in 1907. He was posted Missing after the Battle of Ennetieres (October 29th, 1914), afterwards reported as a prisoner of war in Germany, and is now presumed to have been killed.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Medal Card: WO 372/1/100410

Photo of Henry Metcalfe Appleton
Captain Henry Metcalfe Appleton
House: No 4, 1891 - 1894. Regiment: Dragoon Guards.
Died: 26 January 1918 aged 43 in United Kingdom. Died at Aldershot.
Cemetery: Aldershot Mil Cemetery AG 369

Son of Henry and Georgina Appleton, Rawden Hill, Arthington, Leeds. B. 1875.
Served with the 4th West Yorkshire Militia in the South African War 1900-02, Queen’s Medal with 3 Clasps. King’s Medal with 2 Clasps;
6th Dragoon Guards 1905; Captain, 1st Dragoon Guards, 1908.
Great War. A.P.M. Ulster Division; Major Yeomanry; invalided 1917.
1st (King's) Dragoon Guards.

'He was at School an active and popular member of his House, and afterwards proved himself a good soldier, devoted to his profession, and a comrade whose worth was deeply appreciated by those with whom he served. He joined the 4th West Yorkshire Militia, and with them went to South Africa in 1900, as Captain. For operations in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony, and the Transvaal he was awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps and the King's Medal with two clasps. While still in South Africa he was given a commission in the Inniskilling Dragoons. In 1906 he accepted a Captaincy in the King's Dragoon Guards, then stationed in India. In 1912 he was appointed Adjutant in the Calcutta Light Horse. On the outbreak of the European War he served in France as A.P.M. in the Ulster Division, and went through the fighting in the summer of 1916. Later he served on the Eastern front as second in command of a regiment of Yeomanry, with the rank of Acting Major. In April 1917 he was invalided home and attached to the Reserve Guards at Aldershot. Here he died of pneumonia, in his 43rd year, on Jan. 26th, 1918.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

Photo of John Henry Morris Arden
Lieutenant Colonel John Henry Morris Arden
House: No 3, 1888 - 1892. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 23 July 1918 aged 43 in Eygpt. Died at Cairo.
Cemetery: Alexandria War Memorial Cemetery B. 71

Son of the Rev. A. Henry Arden (Reader in Tamil and Telugu), University of Cambridge, Curborough, Malvern. b. 1875.
Worcestershire Regt. (from Militia) 1897; Captain 1900 ; attached to Egyptian Army 1904; retired 1912; Osmanieh, 4th Class, 1913; South African War 1899—1902, Queens Medal with 3 Clasps, King’s Medal with 2 Clasps.
Great War, re-joined Worcestershire Regt. 1914; Brevet Major 1915 ; D.S.O. ; Brevet Lieut-Colonel; severely wounded and attached Administrative Branch (Egypt)
1918.
No. 3 Cadet Wing Royal Air Force and Reserve of Officers, 2nd Bn. Worcestershire Regiment ,D S O, Mentioned in Despatches, Order of Osmanieh, 2nd Class.

'At the outbreak of the war he re-joined his old regiment and served with them all through the retreat from Mons. He was badly wounded in July 1915, and was awarded the D.S.O. for “conspicuous gallantry and ability" at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, March 12th, 1915 - 'When the Battalion on his right was driven from their trenches, he formed his company under a heavy fire to a flank, counter-attacked the German right with great determination, and thereby enabled the battalion to reoccupy their trenches.'
Later he commanded a battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers, and was dangerously wounded in July 1916. After his recovery, he held a Staff appointment as Commandant of a R.F.C. Cadet wing. Having been asked to undertake an important work of military organization in the Near East, he went to Egypt, and died in hospital, at Cairo, on July 23rd, 1918, a few days after his arrival.
"Johnny" Arden had a genial and happy disposition, and was deservedly popular in the School.' (The Malvernian, November 1918).

Medal card: WO 372/1/109453The Peerage

Photo of Alban Charles Phidias Arnold
2nd Lieut Alban Charles Phidias Arnold
House: Sch, 1906 - 1910. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 07 July 1916 aged 24 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P. 8C 9A 16A

Son of the Rev. Charles Lowther Arnold and Mary Delamere Arnold, of Holy Trinity Vicarage, Fareham, Hants and Wroxall Vicarage, Isle of Wight, b. 1892.
Middle IV A—Modern II. House Prefect. XI Cricket 1909,10 ; Fives Pair.
Magdalene College, Cambridge ; B.A. (Third Class Medieval and Modern Languages Tripos) 1914 ; played Cricket v. Oxford 1914.
Great War, Private 1914 ; afterwards 2nd lieutenant 18th Royal Fusiliers.
11th Bn. attd. 8th Bn. Royal Fusiliers

He went to Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1911, and played cricket for Cambridge University, 1912-14, 5 matches. Hampshire, 1912-14, 16 matches. Free Foresters, 1914, 1 match.

'Alban Arnold was, as his record shows, distinguished both at school and afterwards at cricket. He was an excellent cricket-keeper, one of the two or three best we have had, and a very dangerous though perhaps not quite a sound bat. It was his consistently heavy scoring that forced him into the Cambridge Eleven of 1914. Here he was a steady, quiet, somewhat reserved boy, but always pleasant and attractive, and of striking appearance. He left a year, before his proper time to study in France, with a view to entering the Consular Service. As time went on he "came out" much more, and promised to become a really valuable man. He enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion in the first month of the war, and received his commission later in the year. He was killed in an advance on July 7th, 1916.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Ref:Wisden on the Great War


Final Wicket: Test and First Class Cricketers Killed in the Great War By Nigel McCrery
Wikipedia


Medal card: WO 372/1/118329
8 Bn Royal Fusiliers (1915 June - 1918 Feb) War Diary: WO 95/1857/1

Photo of Edward Dannett Asbury
Captain Edward Dannett Asbury
House: No 4, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: 49 Sq. R. A. F..
Died: 24 September 1918 aged 19 in France. Killed in action near Sulesmes.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Arras Flying Services Memorial

Born June 9th, 1899. D. Asbury (CaptainP &O) , Shorefield, Maze Hill Road, Blackheath and Merivale, Chase Ridings, Enfield and Shorefield, Maze Hill Road, Blackheath. B. 1899.
Middle IV B—Matriculation Form.

'He was a boy of adventurous spirit, well fitted by his temperament and his technical knowledge for service in the R.A.F., in which he was given a commission last year. For six months he was employed as an Instructor, after which he applied for active service abroad, and was sent to France in April 1918. On September 24th his detachment had carried out successfully some important work, when on the return the twelve machines composing it were attacked by an overwhelming force of fifty aeroplanes. Asbury's machine was last seen going down under control. He was at first reported as missing, but it was subsequently ascertained that he and his observer had been killed. His C.O., in a letter to his parents, says: "Your son has done wonderful work with his squadron, and his fine leadership and his cheeriness are sadly missed." ' (Malvernian, Feb 1919)

Aircraft DH 9 serial E8869 missing from operations on Aulnoye 24/9/18 - last seen in combat. The Pilot Cpt E.D. Asbury and Observer 2/Lt B.T. Gillman were both killed.

"As" britannique de la WW1, 5 victoires aériennes partagées avec ses observateurs-mitrailleurs au sein du 49 Sqn du RFC, toutes obtenues sur D.H.9, est tué au combat à bord de son D.H.9 matricule E8869 au dessus de la forêt de Mormal, dans le département du Nord.Crash-aerien
49squadron

Service record: AIR 76/12/17 and AIR 79/771/85242

Photo of Norman Henry Aste
2nd Lieut Norman Henry Aste
House: No 6, 1903 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 04 August 1916 aged 27 in France. Killed in action at Albert.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Albert Communal Extension 1. M. 22

Born 30 May 1889. Son of John Aste (Corn Factor) and Margaret Aste, Hawthorns, Foxgrove road, Beckenham, Kent & 34 Clement's lane, London.
Lower V—Lower VI. House XI Football.

In 1909 was working aged 20 as an articled clerk to a solicitor (John Carnm Holmes).
Solicitor in 1912.

Living at 42 Lancaster Gate, London at time of application for commission in 1915. Had joined the Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry) on 27 Sep 1909 as a Corporal. On active service from 18 Sep 1914 to 7 Feb 1915 when was wounded from a gun shot wound in the right leg (calf).

'The second of three Malvernian brothers, he obtained a commission in the R.A., having already served for five years in the Territorial Forces, and had been at the front for some time before he was killed in action on Aug. 4th. Quiet and serious-minded, he appealed strongly to a large circle of friends with his straightness and utter honesty of purpose and life.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Died from wounds received in action from a G.S. wound in the thigh causing a haemorrhage in the femoral artery.

Service Record: WO 339/28639

Medal Card: WO 372/1/138750
Ancestry

Photo of Charles Neville Attwood
Private Charles Neville Attwood
House: No 4, 1888 - 1889. Regiment: Australian Imp. Inf..
Died: 07 August 1915 aged 44 in Turkey. Killed in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Lone Pine Memorial 52

Son of C. Attwood, The Laurels, Conderton, Tewkesbury. b. 1871.
Modern III—1.
Solicitor in W. Australia.

'He came to Malvern late, and subsequently went to live in Western Australia, where he practised as a solicitor. He volunteered with the first Australian contingent, and was killed at Gallipoli (on August 7th, 1915, when serving with the l6th Infantry Battalion.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Became a farmer in Western Australia. He had two children and was a widower.
Next of kin: Son, daughter, Parents: Colin Charles and Esther Attwood, The Laurels, Conderton, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England Biography Ancestry
-

Photo of Guy Horsman Bailey
Major Guy Horsman Bailey MC
House: No 9, 1905 - 1910. Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery.
Died: 28 February 1917 aged 26 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Guards Cemetery Combles I D 1

Born May 27th 1891, at Springfield, Leigham Court Road, Streatham.
Father: Edward Horsman Bailey, lived at 5 Berners street, London and Foxholes, Chipping Norton, and was a solicitor. Mother was Jane Bailey, formerly Rose.
Middle V—VI. School Prefect. Head of House. Editor of Malvernian. Shooting VIII ; House XI Football. Cadet Officer.
Brasenose College, Oxford ; B.A. 1914.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant E. Anglian Brigade R.F.A. 1914 ; Captain R.H.A. M.C., Despatches.

'By the death of Guy Bailey the Service has lost an Artillery officer of no small promise. His interest and keenness in soldiering was of long standing. At School he devoted an exceptional amount of time to work in the Cadet Corps. At Oxford his interests were divided between rowing and O.U, O.T.C. He rowed in his College Eight for four years, and was Sergeant-Major of the University Battery.
On leaving Oxford he joined the 4th East Anglian Brigade R.F.A., and in March 1915 was selected for a commission in the Regular Artillery. He took part in the landing on Lancashire Beach on April 25th, and was one of the last to embark at the final evacuation of Cape Hellas. He was mentioned in despatches for work in Gallipoli and received the Military Cross. In August 1915 he was transferred to the R.HA., and a year later obtained his captaincy. For three months before his death on Feb. 28th, he was in command of his battery. As a boy he displayed and developed those qualities which marked his after career—a strong sense of duty, courage, force of character and no fear of responsibility. A bold horseman, well known in the Heythrop country, with a real love for horses, he was in his element in the Horse Artillery. Many will mourn the loss of a loyal friend and true sportsman. ' (Malvernian, Apr 1917).

Lived at Foxholes, Chipping Norton, Oxford.
As a Lieutenant, took over command of a neigbouring battery during the prelude to the battle of the Somme on the 28th June 1916 as its Commanding Officer was injured.
Killed by a shell at about 3pm on the 28th February 1917.
At time of death was a Captain, but acting Major, which was subsequently confirmed.

His effects went to his father, with the exception of his pocket book which was of an intimate nature, which went to Mrs Mainby Luxmore, 5 Cumberland House, Kensington Palace.

References (National Archives, Kew):
Service record: WO 374/3114
Medal card: WO 372/1/177612
War Diary of Royal Horse Artillery 15th Brigade : WO 95/2291

Photo of Henry Parkyns Bridge Baines
2nd Lieut Henry Parkyns Bridge Baines
House: No 7, 1896 - 1898. Regiment: Gloucestershire Regt..
Died: 03 February 1917 aged 36 in Iraq. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial PANEL 17

Son of Arthur Baines and Catherine Mary Parkyns Baines, Uley House, Uley, near Dursley, Glos
Modern IV—Lower Modern II.
15th Bn. attd. 7th Bn. Gloucestershire Regiment.

On 2nd February 1917 orders were issued to establish a line of pickets extending from Kala-Haji-Fahan north-west to the River Tigris in the Dahra bend.
During these operations, 2nd Lt Baines was killed. His body was never identified or removed from the battlefield and he is commemorated on Panel 17 of the Basra Memorial.

After the war, his widow, Kathleen Haller, resided at Langham House, 197 Albany Street, Regent's Park, London.
Biography at livesofthefirstworldwar
-

Photo of James Elliot Balfour-Melville
2nd Lieut James Elliot Balfour-Melville
House: No 5, 1896 - 1901. Regiment: Black Watch.
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 33 in France. Killed in action at Loos.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Loos Memorial P 78-83

Born 9th July 1882. Son of Leslie M. and Jeanie Amelia Balfour-Melville, of New Club, Edinburgh and 4 Thistle Court, Edinburgh.
Upper IV—V. School Prefect. XI Football 1898-1900 (captain) ; XI Cricket.
Oriel College, Oxford ; B.A. 1906 ; played Association Football v. Cambridge 1902-05 (captain) ;
Chartered Accountant.
Address: 3 Learmouth Terrace, Edinburgh
3rd Bn. attd. 2nd Bn. Black Watch (Royal Highlanders).

He played football for Oxford University, captaining the side in 1905. A talented cricketer, he kept wicket for Scotland. He was a chartered accountant.

'In the last year of his life, when he had joined the Army, he lost much of his shyness, and "came out" a great deal, so that people came to know and appreciate him. A letter from his Commanding Officer testifies to his great popularity with officers and men. It continues: "He was sniped through the head and killed instantaneously at the furthest point reached by the regiment in their charge. To have kept his men together, and reached such a point is a feat of gallantry and dash beyond all praise." He was killed in France on September 25th aged 33". ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record: WO 339/4981 Surrey in the Great War

Photo of Frederick Oliver Charles Bambridge
Sergeant Frederick Oliver Charles Bambridge
House: No 9, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 13 July 1916 aged 22 in France. Died of wounds.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Albert Communal Extension 1. I 8

Son of Edward Charles Bambridge, a Lloyd’s insurance underwriter, and Kathleen Sylvia (née Bailey) Bambridge of The Elms, 22 Merton Hall Road, Wimbledon, and 121 North Side, Clapham Common, b. 1893.
Upper Shell—Lower V. House XI Cricket.
Underwriter at Lloyd's.
‘B’ Company, 10th (Stockbrokers) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers.

'Oliver Bambridge's friends will readily understand with what alacrity he joined the service at the earliest opportunity. Had he been spared, he would have obtained his commission. It was, however, characteristic of him to join in the ranks, rather than to wait. Many will remember his great keenness in everything he did, and his delightfully happy disposition. He left at a comparatively early age, and before he had reached a prominent position, but not before he had shown that he possessed character and courage. He was the youngest of three brothers whose names are held in honour in their house, and all of whom joined early in the war. He died of wounds on July 13th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

At 9pm on the 10th of July 1916, B and C Companies of the 10th Battalion Royal Fusiliers were pushed forward
to relieve the 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade in their attack towards Pozieres on the Somme. The Fusiliers lay in
exposed positions for the next two days under heavy shell fire, suffering a number of casualties but without engaging
the enemy. Frederick Bambridge was wounded on the 13th of July and died later the same day.

His brother, Rupert Charles Bambridge, was a much decorated Captain in the same Battalion, being the holder of the D.S.O., M.C. and M.M. Sadly, he too was killed in action, in May 1918.
Medals sold at auction for £340 in 2004


Ref:
Lloyd's of London WW1 pdf booklet.

Photo of Rupert Charles Bambridge
Captain Rupert Charles Bambridge DSO
House: No 9, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 23 May 1918 aged 27 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: St Sever Cemetery Rouen OFFICERS B.9.4.

Born 29th April 1891, Boveney, Thornlow Rd, West Norwood. Father:Edward Charles Bambridge. Mother: Kathleen Sylvia Bailey, 121 North Side, Clapham Common.
Lower Shell—VI. School Prefect. Head of House. XXII Cricket; XL Football; Ledbury Cap.
In the London Office of the High Commissioner for the Union of South Africa.
10th Bn. Royal Fusiliers. DSO, MC and Bar, MM

'Rupert Bambridge joined the ranks of the Royal Fusiliers, and went to France in the following July. He was wounded in January 1916, and three months later commissioned. He was again wounded in the Somme battle, in which he won the M.C. To this decoration he added a Bar in the autumn of 1917. Last March he was awarded the D.S.O. for his leadership, skill, and energy in organising the counter-attack which completely established the position. Four honours are a great record, and yet an Officer in his regiment writes: "They do not do him sufficient justice." The sterner life of active service served to develop in a wider sphere the qualities which characterised him at School. His energy, fearlessness, strong sense of duty, and complete appreciation of his responsibilities as Prefect and Head of his House, will be readily recalled by those who knew him as a boy. Letters from brother officers bear witness to the same qualities. "He was the perfect type of regimental officer," writes his C.O., "brave and fearless, full of energy and zeal, loved by his men and officers. He was absolutely reliable, and I never knew him fail in any task that he was given to do. I always felt confident, when he had the job in hand, that the work would be carried out." Another officer records how on several occasions, when under a heavy bombardment, he displayed magnificent courage in looking after his men. He was the eldest of the three brothers, who won for themselves in no small degree the regard and respect of all who knew them. All three have served, and two have fallen in the service of their country'. (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Home: 29.8.1914 - 29.7.1915
BEF: 30.7.1915 - 18.3.1916
Wounded right hand and right thigh 18.1.1916. Awarded the 'Military Medal'.
On 19.12.1916 wounded by a piece of shell in right arm. He had recovered by 25.3.1917.
1.6.1917 Posted to 10 R F. Joined in the field
29.6.1917 To command B Coy
3.12.1917 Awarded Bar to Military Cross
Died of wounds received in action (Gas).

Bar to MC Citation: 'He organised and consolidated his position and established a line of posts under a heavy shell and machine-gun fire. Later in an attack, when the advance was held up by machine-gun fire, he went forward from the support line and reconnoitred the situation. He set a fine example to his men.'

DSO Citation: 'He was ordered to lead his company in a counter-attack against the enemy who had gained a footing in part of the front line. The night was very dark, and the exact position of the enemy was unknown, but he led his men to the best position of assembly, and after a personal reconnaissance launched a counter-attack. This attack being only partially successful, he quickly organised another, which drove the enemy back a considerable distance. At dawn he launched a third attack, drove the enemy out, and completely re-established the original position. The success of the operation was largely due to his splendid leadership, skill, and energy.'

Next of kin: Edward Charles Bambridge, The Elms, Merton Hall Road, Wimbledon

Service record: WO 339/58491
Medal card: WO 372/1/214277

Photo of Fergusson Barclay
Captain Fergusson Barclay
House: Sch, 1892 - 1893. Regiment: Royal Air Force.
Died: 07 December 1918 aged 41 in United Kingdom. Died after accident.
Cemetery: Weston-Super-Mare cemetery 4067

Son of Captain H. F. D. Barclay, Weston-super-Mare. b. 1877.
Ill—Lower IV.
Great War, and Lieutenant Somerset L.I. 1914; Captain R.A.F.
Died as result of an aeroplane accident December 7, 1918.
Service record

Photo of Wilfrid Saxby Barham
Captain Wilfrid Saxby Barham
House: No 6, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 10 October 1915 aged 21 in Belgium. Died of wounds at Poperinghe.
Cemetery: Poperinghe New Cemetery I C 26

Born: 14th November 1894, Dene Wood, 33 Daleham Gardens, Hampstead. Father Managing director of a Public Company.
Son of Colonel A. S. Barham and Annie Gertrude Barham formerly Edwards, Hole Park, Rolvenden, Kent.
Middle IV A—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. Shooting VIII 1912,13

Went to Clare College, Cambridge. Lived at 5 Green Street, Cambridge.
Applied for Commission in May 1914 in 3rd Btn, East Kents (The Buffs).
Attached to 1st Bn, The Buffs.

'During November 1914 he was transferred to the 1st Batt. in France, and was subsequently promoted Captain, His Colonel writing of him says: "He is the greatest loss to his regiment. He was only a boy, and yet he possessed the reliance and assurance of men twice his age. When I decided to place him in command of his Company with subalterns under him ten or even fifteen years older than he, I was much impressed by the way in which he came to the fore and accepted his responsibilities. He commanded his Company in a way that proved that he was a commander of exceptional merit. He was thoroughly reliable and dependable in every respect, and full of sound common sense. He was always cheerful, and did his best to impart his high spirit to those under him." He died of wounds in France on October 10th, aged 21.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

The Wilfred Barham Exhibition was founded in his memory.

Service record: WO/339/14067

Photo of Holroyd Birkett Barker
2nd Lieut Holroyd Birkett Barker
House: No 3, 1900 - 1903. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 15 August 1917 aged 31 in Greece. Died at Salonica.
Cemetery: No Trace In Cwgc

Born 10th October 1886, Acocks Green Birmingham. Son of Tom & Marianne Birkett Barker, Lapworth Croft, Hockley Heath, Warwickshire. Father's Occupation: Engineer (Consulting).
Lower V—VI. Minor Scholar.
Occupation: Solicitor. Address: Exchange Buildings, New Street, Birmingham

'He came to Malvern as a Classical scholar, and at an early age reached the Vlth Form, showing much promise. In 1910 he became a solicitor, practising in Birmingham. He was gazetted a 2nd Lieutenant to the H.G.A. in December 1915, and after much service abroad, where his knowledge of languages proved of the greatest use, he succumbed to malaria and dysentery on August 15th. He was well-known as a golfer in the Midlands, winning the Warwickshire Gold Medal three years in succession. Writing of him a friend says: "His character was quite an unusual one, for he was not given to frivolity, but with level-headed and sound intelligence and a cultured mind he united rare amiability with a refreshing sense of humour and great kindness of heart. Thus he won universal esteem and regard, just as there was so much admiration for his fine sportsmanship. He leaves a record of a finely developed intellectual nature, splendid young manhood and last of all, the noblest sacrifice.'' ' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

134th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.
Disembarked at Salonica on 20.8.1916
On October 1st 1916, telegram sent stating that he disembarked at Malta from Salonica suffering from Malaria.
Died of Dysentery.

Service Record: National Archives Ref: WO 339/50906 Medal Card

Photo of Osborn Barlow
Captain Osborn Barlow M.C.
House: No 1, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 17 April 1918 aged 35 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Cemetery: Locre Hospice Cemetery Belgium 1 C 21

Born 28th June 1883. Son of H. Barlow, Goldthorn Hill, Wolverhampton, b. 1883.
Modern III—Matriculation Class.
In business.
Great War, Private Public Schools Batt. 1914 ;
8th Btn Staffordshire regiment.

'Captain Osborn Barlow, who died of wounds, in France, on April 17th, enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion, and went to France in the autumn of 1915 as a Private. He received his commission in the South Staffordshire Regiment at the beginning of 1917, and in July of that year he was gazetted Captain and was awarded the Military Cross. He had been three times wounded.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Military Cross Citation:
'He commanded his platoon which was held up by enemy wire. Despite a galling fire from machine guns, he walked up and down urging and directing his men. He remained at duty though wounded in both arms.'

12.10.1917. Houthurst Wood. A bullet passed through the soft parts of left forearm between the bones. No injury to bones, vessels or nerves. The wound has healed. (8th Nov 1917).

Next of kin: H. M. Barlow (Brother), 32 Scholars Road, Balham, SW12

Ref: Service Record: WO 339/67028

Photo of Bertram Leeds Thomas Barnett
Captain Bertram Leeds Thomas Barnett
House: No 5, 1889 - 1892. Regiment: Army Service Corps.
Died: 18 April 1915 aged 40 in United Kingdom. Died at Aldershot.
Cemetery: Aldershot Military Cemetery AH 338

Date of birth: 21.6.1875. Son of T. Barnett, Nyton House, Chichester. b. 1875.
Modern II—I.
St. John’s College, Cambridge; B.A. (Third Class Natural Science Tripos) 1896; MB., B.C., 1902; St. George’s Hospital; M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 1901; D.P.H. R.C.P.S. Lond. 1903; Inspector Public Health Department, Cairo, 1905—07; Medical Officer of Health, Hong Kong; Solicitor 1909; Medical Officer of Health, Isle of Ely.
Great War, Captain A.S.

Appointed Captain 18.1.1915

'Suicide whilst of unsound mind'.
A newspaper account stated that he suffered from varicose veins, which had not been cured by an operation, leading to insomnia due to severe pain. He was also very worried about being able to carry out his duties. He was found hanged early on Sunday morning.
He had previously been a Medical Health Officer in Cambridge, Hong Kong and Egypt.

Grantees of Will: Rev Arthur Thomas Barnett and Harold Thomas Barnett.(Brothers of deceased).

Service Record: National Archives Ref: WO 339/19776

Photo of Frederick Leycester Barwell
Captain Frederick Leycester Barwell
House: No 3, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: 40 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 29 April 1917 aged 22 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Beaumont Community WEST HEDGE

Son of A. L. Barwell, The Tower, Ascot, b. 1895.
Upper IV B—Matriculation Class. House Prefect.
Great War, Private Queen's Westminster Rifles ;
16th Bn London Regiment & RFC.

'A boy of sound principle, earnestness of character, and strong common sense, he did excellent service in his house, in which he was very popular. He was about to enter Pembroke College, Cambridge, when at the beginning of the war he enlisted in the Queen's Westminster Rifles, in which after a few weeks he received a commission. He served with his Battalion in France from November, 1914, until August, 1915, when he returned home on sick leave. In 1916 he was again at the front from April until he was, in September, slightly wounded. In January, 1917, he joined the R.F.C., and gaining his Pilot's certificate in April, proceeded at once to the front. He had been promoted Lieutenant in April, 1915, and Captain in July 1916. On April 29th he was sent out on a reconnaissance, from which he did not return. Later it was discovered through evidence of German prisoners that he had, single-handed, engaged five or six German planes in a fight which lasted a full half-hour, and was watched by enemy troops in the neighbourhood with intense admiration for the courage of the Englishman, who again and again attacked his opponents. He appears to have brought his machine to within a few feet of the ground when he expired, his machine crashing. He was buried by the enemy with military honours. His Squadron Commander writing of his last action says: "It was one of the bravest deeds I have ever heard of, and it shows that the Royal Flying Corps has lost a very gallant officer. We miss him awfully in the Squadron both as a Pilot and in the mess. Although he had been with us a very short time, he was very popular indeed, and was already a very good Pilot and showed signs of becoming a brilliant one. He died one of the finest deaths in quite the finest way." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Wounded in Sep 1916.
Report of medical board 20th Sep 1916:
Service: 25 months
Disability: 'wound of knee'
'This officer is suffering from injury detailed on form A45a attached. In addition he is suffering from exhaustion neurosis brought on by 15 months continuous & arduous active service. At Gommecourt on July 21st his battalion was wiped out, only 150 men remaining after an attack on the German trenches. He has been suffering from diarrhoea, palpitations, headaches, exhaustion, dyspepsia, & insomnia & is subject at times to attacks of nervousness.'
'The board find that this officer fell in a front line trench & sustained a slight abrasion of the knee which has now healed. He is suffering from exhaustion nervosis as detailed in a45 attached'.

Dec 30th 1916. Wound of the left knee is now completely healed.

Missing 29.4.1917. Next of Kin: A. L. Barwell, The Tower, Ascot, Bucks.
Extract from GHQ 109s: 'Information has been received from a German message dropped into our lines that the above named officer was killed'.
Officer was shot down flying Nieuport single seater Scout A/6745 near Beaumont west of Douia.
'April 29th, about 7pm a British bi-plane engaged 5 or 6 German planes near Beaumont in the direction of Henin Lietard. The combat lasted a full half hour.'

Service Record: WO 374/4529

Photo of Bernard Montagu Basil Bateman
Lieutenant Bernard Montagu Basil Bateman MC
House: No 1, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 24 July 1915 aged 24 in United Kingdom. Died in London of wounds received in Ypres.
Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium NICHE 1825

Son of General B. M. Bateman, R.G.A.. b. 1891.
Army III—I. Minor Scholar. House XI Football.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A. 1910 ; Lieutenant 1913.

'He was in the retreat from Flanders at Mons, Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne, was wounded twice slightly on September 13th at Chassemy, and was sent to a hospital in France. He joined his battery again on September 27th—his wounds hardly healed —and was in the thick of the fighting area on the Aisne, and gave much fighting service since, gaining the tribute from a comrade that "He knows his duty thoroughly, and does it thoroughly, and always does it as if he loved it." He was awarded the Military Cross ‘for conspicuous gallantry on 10th June, 1915, near Ypres, when he was dangerously wounded in endeavouring to restore telephone communication under very severe fire, and had been noted for consistent gallantry, and was wounded on two previous occasions’. He died on July 24th of wounds received on that occasion.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).
Biography

Photo of Edward Charles Vulliamy Battle
2nd Lieut Edward Charles Vulliamy Battle
House: No 9, 1909 - 1912. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 21 October 1914 aged 20 in France. Killed in action near Lille.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial

Son of W. H. Battle, 49 Harley Street, W. b. 1894.
Middle IV—Army II. House Prefect. Shooting VIII.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Worcestershire Regt. 1914.
Great War, killed in action October 21, 1914.
Biography at Bedales

Service record: WO 339/11139
Geni profile
-

Photo of Hugh Beacall
Lieutenant Hugh Beacall
House: No 6, 1907 - 1912. Regiment: Shropshire Light Inf..
Died: 14 May 1915 aged 22 in France. Died of wounds near Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Boulogne East II B 39

Son of H. M. Beacall, Erdington House, Bridgnorth, b. 1893.
Lower V -Army I. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football; XXII Cricket. Cadet Officer.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Shropshire L.I. 1914 ; Lieutenant 1914.

'He went with his Battalion to the front from India in December, and was later appointed Adjutant. He died on May 14 of wounds received near Ypres. His Colonel writing of him says : "Personally I have lost an officer I shall miss horribly as long as I am here. I had the greatest confidence in him, his gallantry, and sound common sense. He was a thorough soldier. He had done two or three gallant deeds that I was hoping to bring to notice. I had found them out, although he never said a word." Such an epitaph is only what his friends would have expected from his cheery plucky character.' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).
Biography
Medal card: WO 372/2/53276

Photo of Roy Dixon Beall
Lieutenant Roy Dixon Beall
House: No 2, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 04 June 1915 aged 25 in France. Killed in action at Neuve Chapelle.
Cemetery: St Vaast Post Mil Cemetery Richebourg L'avoie I E 9

Born: Oct 21st 1890, St Margarets Twickenham
Father: Walter James Beall (Lace Agent) Manchester House, Friday Street, London and Trebarwith, Sanderstead, Surrey,
Mother: Isabel Mary Beall.
4 Siblings: Isabel, Kathleen, John, Alan
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A. 1910 ; Lieutenant 1913. 7th Battery, Royal Field Artillery.

'Oil leaving Woolwich he went out to India and remained there till Sept. 1914, when he went to France with the Indian Expeditionary Force. Killed in action.' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

Service record: WO 339/7776

Photo of Cuthbert Patrick Bell
Lieutenant Cuthbert Patrick Bell
House: Sch, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Devon Regt..
Died: 23 February 1918 aged 20 in Italy. Died of wounds in Italy.
Cemetery: Giavera British Arcade Italy P4 ROW C GR 4

Born: March 17th 1897. Son of P. T. Bell
Lower IV—Upper IV.
Address: 6 St Pauls Rd, Preston, Paignton, Devon
Went to Park House Prep School, Devon before Malvern
9th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment.

'He received his commission in May 1915, and was sent to the front in France in September 1916. He came home on sick leave in 1917, but returned to France in September of that year, proceeding to another front in the following November. Leaving school at the age of 16, he was too young to have made his mark here, but letters from his commanding officer and others show that "he was possessed of remarkable courage and an extraordinary contempt for danger. His courage and gallantry have been a great example to his men." ' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Next of kin: Mrs Diana Bell (Mother), Ladies Army & Navy Club, Burlington Gardens. She was a widow and lost her only child.

Service record: WO 339/41254

Photo of Guy Bayford Bell
Lieutenant Guy Bayford Bell
House: No 4, 1885 - 1892. Regiment: Machine Gun Corps.
Died: 28 April 1917 aged 43 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 5

Born Nov 5th 1874, Bayford House, Rosslyn Park, Hampstead. Father: Alfred Bell (Artist in Glass). Mother: Jane Bell formerly Burlison.
Junior School—Upper V. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; House XI Footbal
5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers.

'For twenty years in the 'seventies and 'eighties there was a "Joey" Bell in No. 4; and for the next twenty years tradition preserved the name of "the Bell who was rolled over by the Big Roller." The youngest of four brothers, sons of one of the founders of the firm of Clayton & Bell, well-known for their stained-glass windows, Guy at once achieved distinction as the smallest boy who had ever come to Malvern, and soon established himself as a general favourite. But he was destined to become a historical character. In those days each House furnished a squad one day a week to roll the Senior wicket after breakfast; and one morning during his first summer term. Bell was sitting with several others between the shafts, when the bell rang for Chapel and the roller was trotted off the ground. The jolting of the shafts shook him from his seat, and the heavy roller with its cargo of passengers went right over him, head and all. Fortunately the ground was soft, and so was he. A small blood vessel burst in his head, and that was all. He was allowed to ''feel rather flat" in the Matron's room for a day or two; then he reappeared smiling, apparently none the worse. At any rate he lived happily in No. 4 for many years afterwards. In Australia when war broke out, he came home and took a commission in the Northumberland Fusiliers. After being wounded in February, 1916, he was killed while serving as Lieutenant in the Lancashire Fusiliers, Machine Gun Corps, on April 28, 1917.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Address (1916): Mount Pleasant Drake near Tenterfield, New South Wales formerly 6 Broadhurst Gardens, Hampstead, and 40 Regents Park Road.
Owned 1280 acres of land at Jenny Lind County.

Brother: John Clement & Otto Joseph Bell.
Sisters: Edith Margaret Underwood (widow), Rosaling Bessie Larkworthy, Cecilia Florence Osmond, Aelfrida Teresa Bell (spinster).
Biography at hampsteadparishchurch

Service record: WO 374/5494

Photo of James Clifford Aveling Bell
Captain James Clifford Aveling Bell
House: Sch, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 30 May 1918 aged 24 in France. Killed in Air Raid in hospital at Doullens.
Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 70

Born July 6th 1894. Son of Sir James Bell, Hill Place, Farnham Royal, Bucks, b. 1894.
Middle IV—Middle Shell.
Great War, Private Public Schools' Batt. 1914 ;
Address: Hill Place, Farnham Royal, Bucks

'Never a boy of very robust health, J. C. A. Bell was always a "trier." His determination of character was shown by his persistent and finally successful efforts to get passed for service, and he did right well as a soldier. At school he was prevented by physical causes from distinguishing himself, but he had a good deal of quiet influence, and left a blameless record behind him.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Embarked: 10th Sept 1915
To England: 24th July 1916. Myalgia from kick by horse on July 17th 1916. He was exercising his horse which fell when jumping a wall, rolled over, & kicked him in the back of right hip.

Embarked: 24th May 1917
Wounded: 7th Aug 1917 and 18th May 1918
Next of kin: Sir James Bell (Father), 4 Queens Gardens, Osborne Road, Windsor

Service record: WO 374/6145

Photo of Reginald Alfred Bell
Private Reginald Alfred Bell
House: No 4, 1915 - 1917. Regiment: East Surrey Regt..
Died: 16 July 1919 aged 18 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed in England.
Cemetery: Forest Town St Alban Churchyard Nottingham

Son of Major Otto J. Bell of 7 Palliser Court Baron's Court London and The Manor House, Hampton-on-Thames, and the late Sybil Ormond Bell
Lower IV—Middle IV.
Great War, Private East Surrey Regt.

'The son of Major O. J. Bell (O. M.), of the Manor House, Hampton-on-Thames, he was serving as a Private in the East Surrey Regiment, and was accidentally killed, at Clipstone Camp, on July 19th, at the early age of eighteen.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Photo of Frank Allyn Benitz
2nd Lieut Frank Allyn Benitz
House: No 3, 1907 - 1910. Regiment: Royal Flying Corps.
Died: 05 August 1918 aged 25 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying.
Cemetery: Gainsborough General Cemetery C 117

Son of W. O. Benitz, La California, F.C.C.A., Argentina, b. 1893.
Lower IV—Middle IV B.
University of Illinois ;
Rancher in Argentina.

'Frankie Benitz was one of those boys who win popularity from an infectious keenness to be always doing their utmost. He loved Malvern, and has never lost touch with it, nor can his many friendships here ever be forgotten. Flying is exactly what would appeal to him, but it was not for that alone that he hastened back from the Argentine: he knew what he owed to England, and he put himself where he could best serve her. Unfortunately a thick mist deprived her of a first-class airman.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).
Biography at benitz.com

Photo of Vivian Wilfred Bennett
2nd Lieut Vivian Wilfred Bennett
House: No 9, 1910 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 21 October 1917 aged 21 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Bard Cottage Cemetery V1 A 28

Born Oct 20th 1896, Mhow, Central India. Son of Lieut.-Colonel V. B. Bennett, I.M.S.
Army II—I. Lygon Scholar. School Prefect. XXII Cricket and Football; Ledbury Cap; Gymnasium IV 1913-15 ; Anderson Medal 1914,15. Cadet Officer.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.E. 1915 ; Lieutenant 1916.

'It was impossible to imagine Vivian Bennett adopting any career in life but that of a soldier. No other profession could have satisfied him; and in him a fine soldier, who promised to go far in the service, has been lost. From boyhood he always showed a fearlessness, prevented by his good brains from developing into recklessness, which was bound to make him a leader of British soldiers. Above all he possessed so bright and cheerful a disposition that everyone loved him. Never to be depressed, and always to see some humour in every circumstance, is a gift worth possessing at any time, but on active service it is beyond price. This Bennett had, and his old Malvern friends—and many a sapper, officer and man—will feel the sadder for his death.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

On the 25th Sept 1916, he was buried under the bricks of a house wall knocked down by a shell and sustained an injury to his left knee.

Next of Kin: Mrs Alexandra Philippa Bennett (mother), c/o Messrs Thomas Cook & Son, Bombay
Siblings: Hugh & Helen

NB: Malvern College in 1919 sent details of the proposed war memorial and the roll of honour to the war office which are now in his service record file.
Biography at Northam remembered

Service record: WO 339/55508

Photo of Percy Haycraft Berry
Lieutenant Percy Haycraft Berry
House: No 3, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps.
Died: 10 March 1916 aged 28 in Eygpt. Drowned in Egypt saving life.
Cemetery: Alexandria War Memorial Cemetery B 161

Son of Dr. F. H. Berry, Clarendon Road, Watford, b. 1888.
Lower V—Science Form. School Prefect. House XI Football.
King's College, Cambridge ; B.A. (Third Class Natural Science Tripos) 1910 ; B.Ch. 1913 ; Guy's Hospital; M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 1913.

Joined the R.A.M.C. on May 1st 1915 and shortly afterwards left Aldershot for Alexandria. He was appointed to the Hospital Ship "Assaye" and was engaged in transporting the wounded from Gallipoli through the summer and autumn. Subsequently he was attached as Medical Officer to the Berkshire Yeomanry and with them joined the Western Frontier Force of Egypt in the campaign against Senussi. In this he was completely happy and declared that he had at last found the ideal form of warfare.

'Percy Berry was one of a delightfully happy band of friends in No 3. He thoroughly enjoyed life, and he set himself to make others enjoy it also. He was a boy of high ideals and a staunch friend. At Cambridge he acquired a real love for the profession of a doctor, and he readily gave his services to the R.A.M.C. at the outbreak of war. His last act will thrill his many friends with pride. On March l0th, while on duty in Egypt, he noticed a man drowning ; he plunged off the rocks into heavy surf with all his clothes on. Immediately a big wave broke over him and he disappeared. His body was found five hours later with a large wound in the head. He was buried on the following day at Barany with military honours. ' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

The official account of his death stated:-
'On 10th March at Berrani - seeing a man drowning - plunged off rock into heavy surf with all his clothes on to rescue. Immediately a big wave broke over him and he disappeared. Body found later with large wounds, head, apparently Anti-Mortem.'
Guys Hospital

Photo of Frank Robson Best
Lieutenant Frank Robson Best
House: No 9, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: North Lancashire Regt..
Died: 02 January 1916 aged 22 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Authuile Military Cemetery B 72

Born: Feb 26th 1894. Father: Mr William Findlay Best (Hop Merchant), Altadore, Ribbleton, Preston, Lancs
Mother: Ellen Ann Best formerly Wesfall
Modern III—I.
3.5 years at Malvern OTC
Occupation: Hop Merchant
2nd Lieut on 24th Feb 1915, 1/4th Btn Loyal North Lancashire Regt.

'He was in his father's business, which he left to take a commission. A fortnight before his death he was struck by a piece of shrapnel but only bruised. He was killed in France on Jan. 2nd. His Colonel wrote: " He never suffered, as he died in his sleep in his dug-out. We are all very much shocked, and especially his Company, who, although he had not been out very long, had grown very fond of him.' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

Service record: WO 374/6145

Photo of Christopher Bethell
Captain Christopher Bethell
House: No 6, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.
Died: 20 February 1916 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at Armentieres.
Cemetery: Cite Bonjean Armentieres 1X F 81

Born: 27 Dec 1884, Poonah, Bombay, India. Son of Col. Edward Hugh Bethell, of 18, Hyde Park Square, London, W.2., and the late Mrs. Bethell.
Upper IV—Middle V. Minor Scholar.
Trinity College, Cambridge ; Jun. Opt. 1907 ; B.A., LL.B. (Second Class Law Tripos, Part II) 1908 ; President of the Cambridge Union Society 1908 ; Barrister, Inner Temple, 1909 ; worked for many years at Cambridge House, Camberwell.

Applied on 15 Aug 1914. Private Coldstream Guards 1914.
10th Bn. King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
Mentioned in Despatches

'He was a boy of considerable ability with tastes out of the common. His health prevented him from gaining any prominence in out-of-door pursuits, but his quick humour and merry disposition gained him many friends. After a not undistinguished career at Cambridge, he was called to the Bar, but devoted all his energies to philanthropic work at Cambridge House, Camberwell, for some years. On the outbreak of the war he enlisted in the Coldstream Guards, and finished a three months' recruits course; he then accepted a commission in the 10th Yorkshire.Light Infantry, and was promoted Captain last August before the Battalion embarked. He was killed in Flanders on February 20th.' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

Service record: WO 339/18086

Photo of Arthur Rushton Bickham
Captain Arthur Rushton Bickham
House: No 2, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 15 February 1919 aged 34 in United Kingdom. Died.
Cemetery: Lindow St John Church Cheshire NE2 330

Son of George and Ellen Maud Bickham. Born at Alderley Edge, Manchester.
Middle V—Upper V. House Scholar. Gymnasium Team.
East Indian Shipping.
133rd East Cheshire Heavy Battery R.G.A.
Mentioned in Despatches.
Address: Hill View, Alderley Edge, Cheshire formerly of 8 Great Marlborough St, Manchester
Died at Lyndhurst, Altrincham

Brother: Walter Saxon Bickham
Sister Miss Bickham, 33 Bath Lane, Newcastle on Tyne

Service record: WO 339/48261

Photo of Henry Francis Bingham-Stevens
Lieutenant Henry Francis Bingham-Stevens
House: No 3, 1904 - 1907. Regiment: Royal West Kent Regt..
Died: 17 September 1915 aged 25 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Poelcapelle British Cemetery L X1 D 3

Son of The Rev. Canon Bingham Stevens and Mrs. Bingham Stevens, of The Beck, Wateringbury, Kent.
Upper IV B—Army II. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Keble College, Oxford ; B.A. (Third Class History) 1914.
6th Bn. Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

'All through his school career he showed remarkable vigour and keenness in all that he did. He was of an independent nature with a strong sense of duty, and he did his work as a House Prefect in a conscientious, straightforward manner. He was looking forward to taking Holy Orders. He left Oxford in June 1914, and shortly after the outbreak of war he received a commission in the 6th Royal West Kent Regiment, He was killed in France on Sept. 17th, aged 25.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record: WO 339/11531 Geni Profile inc biography Also and war diary extract and at Keble

Photo of Wilfred Stanley Bird
Lieutenant Wilfred Stanley Bird
House: Sch, 1897 - 1902. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 09 May 1915 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at Rue Du Bois.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P32/33

Son of Rev, H, G, Bird, Newdigate Rectory, Surrey, b. 1883.
Shell—Remove. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket 1900-02 ; XI Football. Lieutenant in Corps.
New College, Oxford ; B.A. 1906 ; played Cricket v. Cambridge 1904-06 (captain) ; represented Gentlemen v. Players ;
Assistant Master at Ludgrove.
5th Bn. attd. 2nd Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps.

"He was ordered to lead his men out of the trenches across an exposed 300 yards, and was killed instantaneously by machine gun fire whilst cheering them on. Every officer in the charge was either wounded or killed.”
Canon S. R. James writes of him: "When I first came to Malvern in Sept. 1897, one of the new boys in School House was Wilfred Bird. From the beginning of his school career, the most cordial and pleasant relation existed without a break between us. He was perhaps a little mistrustful of himself, and did not always find it easy to cope with difficulties, but he grew steadily in vigour of all kinds, and made many friends. Besides his brilliant career as a cricketer, he was a School Prefect and Head of School House, in which capacity I know of a certainty that he was truly conscientious and devoted himself unsparingly to the highest interests of the school and house. ' One of the best,' he remained humble, kind, upright, and God-fearing to the last." (Malvernian, Jun 1915).
Detailed Biography

Photo of John Neill Black
Major John Neill Black
House: No 4, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Somerset Light Inf..
Died: 09 April 1917 aged 23 in France. Killed in action at Wancourt.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Tigris Lane Wancourt 1E 12

Born: June 13th 1894. Son of William Neill Black and May Gordon Black, of Olleworth Park, Wotton-under-Edge, Glos and Otterhead, Taunton.
Middle IV B—Matriculation Class. XI Cricket; XL Football.
Clare College, Cambridge.
6th Bn. Somerset Light Infantry .
Mentioned in Despatches.
Address: Otterhead, Taunton Somerset

'Type of the healthy, high-spirited, merry-hearted boy, a lover of the open air, and proficient in many forms of sport, John Black was sure to win the admiration of his fellows. But the remarkable influence which he exercised upon those around him at School rested on the more solid foundation of a character which was singularly sincere, unselfish, and, in the full sense of the word, chivalrous. Little wonder that he made a fine soldier and became the best loved officer in his battalion and the idol of his men. He had completed one year at Cambridge, when in September, 1914, he was gazetted to a Battalion of the Somerset L. I. From May, 1915, until his death, except for a short period in hospital in consequence of a wound accidentally received, he saw continuous service abroad. He obtained his company in November, 1915, and since January, 1917, served as Major and second in command of the Battalion, doing, says his C.O., "magnificent work." On April 9th he led the first company in a most successful attack right up to the enemy's third line defences, and was consolidating the position won, when he was hit by shrapnel and died instantaneously.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

The John Neill Black Exhibition was founded in his memory.

Service record: WO 339/12710
Livesofthefirstworldwar

Photo of Gordon Home Blackader
Captain Gordon Home Blackader
House: Sch, 1900 - 1901. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 10 August 1916 aged 31 in Canada. Died of wounds near Zillebeke.
Cemetery: Montreal Mount Royal

Son of Mrs A.D. Blackader of 236, Mountain Street, Montreal. Husband of Kathleen Blackader, of 242, Sherbrooke Street, West Montreal
Middle IV—Lower Shell.
McGill College, Montreal; B. Arch. ; studied in Paris ;
Architect; 5th Royal Highlanders, Canada, 1912, 42nd Bn. Canadian Infantry.

'Gordon Blackader was a fine big quiet lad when he came to Malvern from Canada. Unfortunately he only remained here for a year, but during that time he won the respect and liking of all. He returned to Canada in 1901, and was, at the time when war broke out, a successful and rising architect. He joined the Canadian Infantry (affiliated to the Black Watch), in which he was, at the time of his death, a Company Commander. He leaves a widow and a daughter.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).
Canadian virtual war memorial Biography at dictionary of architects in Canada

Photo of Patrick Edward Adam Blair
2nd Lieut Patrick Edward Adam Blair
House: No 5, 1907 - 1911. Regiment: Black Watch.
Died: 29 October 1914 aged 21 in Belgium. Killed in action near Gheluvelt.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 37

Son of Lt. Col. A. S. Blair, C.M.G., T.D., and Mrs. Elinor W. Blair, of 36, India St., Edinburgh.
Lower V—Army I. House Prefect. Cadet Officer.
Edinburgh Academy
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A. (Special Reserve) 1912 ; 1st Bn. Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 1914.
Picture and short biography

Photo of Edward Silvester Blake
Officer Cadet Edward Silvester Blake
House: Day, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: O. T. C..
Died: 09 March 1916 aged 20 in United Kingdom. Died in London.
Cemetery: Died In London No Further Details

Son of Rev. J. E. H. Blake, 14 The Lees, Malvern, b. 1896.
Middle IV A—Matriculation Class. Gale Prize. House Prefect.
University College Hospital.
Great War, Private London University O.T.C. 1914.

'On leaving in Oct. 1914, he entered on a medical career at London University He started with the R.A.M.C., but got himself transferred to the Artillery section of the London Univ. O.T.C. in Jan. last, and had nearly completed two months' training with them. On Feb, 25th, though feeling unwell he went out on night duty, and was subsequently found to be suffering from measles. Pneumonia supervened, and he died on March 9th. His ingenuous and unselfish character was well-known to many here, and the greatest sympathy is felt for his parents by their many friends in Malvern.' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

Photo of George Penderell Blake
Captain George Penderell Blake
House: No 7, 1893 - 1898. Regiment: Welch Fusiliers.
Died: 21 July 1916 aged 37 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: A. I. F. Burial Ground, Flers XV F 26

Son of George Farncombe Blake and Mary Elizabeth Blake, of King's Heath, Birmingham
Shell B—Mathematical VI. Minor Scholar. Dowdeswell Prize ;
Leaving Scholarship. Senior Chapel Prefect. President of Debating Society. XXII Football; House XI Cricket; Ledbury Cap. Lieutenant in Corps.
Scholar, Trinity College, Cambridge; B.A. (Sen. Opt.) 1901 ; Assistant Master at Merchiston Castle School 1902-05 ; Bradfield College 1905 ; Captain Cadet Corps.
10th Bn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

'As soon as hostilities commenced he was offered a commission in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which he accepted, and went out to the front in September 1915. He was wounded in February, and killed in action, July 21st.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).
Biography at Moseley Society

Photo of James Robert Blake
Captain James Robert Blake
House: Day, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 25 March 1918 aged 25 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 6

Born 21st October 1893, Manor House, Wilnscote, Warwick. Son of Rev. James Edward Huxley Blake and Beatrice Harriet Blake (formerly Milward), of 4, College Yard, Worcester and The Lees, Malvern. Sister: Beatrice Elizabeth Blake, Bretforton Vicarage, Honeybourne, Worcestershire
Modern III—I. House Prefect. Head of House.
Architect.
Address: The Lees, Malvern
8th Bn. attd. 14th Bn. Worcestershire Regiment , Twice Mentioned in Despatches.

'James Blake was a boy of more than ordinary capacity. He soon made his way to the top of the Modern Side, and became Head of his House. The profession he chose, that of an architect, was one eminently adapted to bring out his considerable artistic gifts. He was doing good work when the call to arms came in 1914. He joined the 8th Worcesters, soon obtained a commission, and took part in some of the hardest fighting on the Western Front. Two mentions in despatches and the testimony of his superior officers, prove that he possessed not merely ability and determination, but also powers of leadership of a high order.' (Malvernian, Apr 1919).

6 Jan 1915. Corporal James Robert Blake to be Second Lieutenant.
13.9.1916 Medical Board: 'He has been in France for 17 months. He contracted measles on 13/8/16 and this was followed by laryngitis and pneumonia. He was admitted to hospital on 7/9/16.'
Missing at Courcelette.
Nnwfhs rememberthefallen
Service Record: WO 374/7021

Photo of Norman Pilkington Blake
Captain Norman Pilkington Blake
House: No 2, 1905 - 1908. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 14 July 1916 aged 26 in France. Killed in action at Longueval.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Quarry Mem. Montauban 111. D 6

Born 13 March 1890. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Eustace Blake, 6 Queen's Gate Place, S.W, and Groton House, Boxford, Suffolk and Hillside Cottage, Steeple Aston, Oxon and Fairlawn, Maskeliya, Ceylon.
Army III—I. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Experience: Ceylon Platers Rifle Corps & Malvern College Cadet Corps
Became a Tea Planter in Ceylon and came home to join in the early days of the War.
8th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment

'In his school-days Norman Blake gave every promise of being useful to his country when he grew up, and when the demand for service came he readily answered the call. He did not proceed to Sandhurst from Malvern, as he had originally intended to do, but went out to Ceylon as a tea-planter, and was well established there when war broke out. He then returned to England and obtained a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment. He went to the front in October 1915, and was wounded in March 1916. He re-joined his regiment in May last. He fell in action, on one of the early days of July, whilst he was most gallantly leading his company. The high estimate formed of his character when he was here has been amply confirmed by the subsequent events of the life which he has given for his country.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).
Somme roll-of-honour
Service record: WO 339/40971

Photo of Richard Bolster
Major Richard Bolster
House: No 1, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 15 July 1917 aged 34 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Ecoivres Mont St Eloi V1 J 12

Son of Inspector General (formerly Surgeon-General) T. C. Bolster, R.N., and Mrs. Bolster; husband of Mary C. Bolster, of "Woodlands," Meopham, Kent.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.G.A. 1903 ; Lieutenant 1906 ; retired 1909,
Great War, re-joined 1914 .
124th Bty. 28th Bde. Royal Field Artillery
M C
Invisionzone

Photo of Harry Wittenbury Bone
2nd Lieut Harry Wittenbury Bone
House: No 1, 1911 - 1913. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 19 in France. Killed in action at Loos.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Loos Memorial P 73-76

Born 10th June 1896, Tamworth, The Common, Mitcham, Surrey
Son of Henry Peters Bone (Member of the stock exchange) and Lilian Maude Bone formerly Watney, of 5, Hamilton Mansions, Hove, Sussex, and 28 Adelaide Crescent, Hove.
Upper IV B—Science II.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 1st Bn. South Staffordshire Regt. 1915.

'Probably few of the fellows, even those in his own House, got to know Harry Bone well ; self-contained and fond of working at his own hobbies he made few friends ; but those who penetrated below the surface of his affected indifference knew him for what he really was, a sound, clean-minded, honest English school-boy. When he joined his regiment in France, he at once showed the real grit that was in him; he was popular with his brother officers, and his men were devoted to him. In the charge in which he lost his life, the Allies cut right through the German lines, but only one officer was left to return with the tale. He was killed in France, September 25 — 27, aged 19.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Brother: Cyril Bone (age 11).

Service record: WO 339/42473

Photo of Noel Charles Boosey
Captain Noel Charles Boosey
House: No 5, 1905 - 1910. Regiment: The Queens Regt..
Died: 22 July 1915 aged 24 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Chocques Mil Cemetery 1 B 19

Born: 8th November 1891 at 2 Hayes Lane, Bromley, Kent
Son of Arthur Boosey (Music Publisher) and Lucy Ashton Boosey formerly Whitehead, of "The Cedars," Bromley Common, Bromley, Kent.
2 brothers and 2 sisters.
Lower Modern II—Modern I. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Cricket. Cadet Officer.
In business;
Became 2nd Lieutenant on 15th March 1913. 22nd Bn. London Regiment.

'Dutv first, self last, briefly expresses his character. He was full of life with high ideals, and he had a great sense of humour. He was not cut out for a soldier, being essentially a man of peace ; but when the call sounded, and he thought it was his duty to respond, he did so at once.
A fellow officer, an O.M., wrote of his death: "He and his brother Leslie and I worked together in the same company all through the war, and I think Noel had the most charming personality of anyone I ever met, besides being a most excellent officer. He was quite the most popular officer in the Battalion, and always went about the most unpleasant and dangerous jobs in the most cheerful way. The men all loved him. I think we would all have lost anyone rather than him." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Brother: Captain N. W. Boosey 22nd London Regiment was handed the personal possessions.

Service record: WO 374/7603

Photo of Hugh William Bostock
2nd Lieut Hugh William Bostock
House: No 2, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 12 June 1915 aged 29 in France. Killed in action at Wulverghem.
Cemetery: St Quentin Cabaret Cemetery 1 E 14

Born 20th June 1886 in Castres, St. Lucia, West Indies. Son of Mr. John Henry and Mrs. Caroline Sophia Bostock, Uplands, Colombo, Ceylon.
Lower IV—Army II. House XI Football.
With L.N.W.R.
6th Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment.

On leaving school he went into the Manager's Office of the L. & N.W. Railway. When war broke out he joined the 6th Batt, of the .South Staffordshire Regiment (T. F.).

He was killed by a shell, on Hill 60, Ypres. 'He was found, notebook in hand, and pipe in his mouth.'
Biography at bostock.net

Photo of William Carroll Bower
2nd Lieut William Carroll Bower
House: No 6, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 09 August 1916 aged 20 in Belgium. Died in France.
Cemetery: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery 1X A 15

Born July 8th 1896, Langton Lodge, Hendon, Middlesex. Son of William Bower (Bachelor of Medicine) and Edith Corinna Bower formerly Carroll, late of Hendon, Middx and Clywd Hall, Ruthin and 'Coed Mawr', Holywell, Flintshire, and Raleigh House, Ottery St. Mary, Devon, b. 1896.
Middle Shell—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. XL Cricket and Football.

Went to Cambridge University and then to the Royal Military College, January 1915.
1st Bn. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment).

'On leaving Sandhurst, where he was a Cadet Officer, he joined the K.O.R. Lancaster Regiment, and went to France in July of this year. He had only been there less than a month when he succumbed to appendicitis on August 9th. A boy of great charm and one of the keenest of Malvernians, his early death cut short what seemed likely to prove a promising career.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Service record: WO 339/56299

Photo of David Erskine Boyle
Lieutenant David Erskine Boyle
House: No 2, 1903 - 1908. Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died: 26 August 1914 aged 25 in France. Killed in action at Cambrai.
Battle: Battle of Le Cateau. Cemetery: La Ferte Sous Jouarre

Son of the late Rear-Admiral Robert Hornby Boyle. b. 1889.
Middle IV B—Army I. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football; XXII Cricket; Ledbury Cap. Lieutenant in Corps.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Lancashire Fusiliers 1909 ; Lieutenant 1911.
2nd Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers.

'From his career at school it was anticipated that he would prove himself a most capable officer, and this he turned out to be. His sterling qualities and his sound influence won for him the esteem of officers and men alike. He was always spoken of as "a splendid officer."
He was killed in action near Cambrai on August 26th, three days after his regiment landed in France. He was in the act of summoning aid for a fellow-officer who had just been wounded, when he himself fell. (Malvernian, Nov 1914)
Biography IWM

Photo of Guy Bracher
2nd Lieut Guy Bracher
House: No 3, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 03 July 1916 aged 27 in France. Killed in action near Albert.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Aveluy Communal Extension F 42

Born 27th October 1889 at 2 Church Road, Ashford. Son of Henry James Bracher (Solicitor) and Marian Alexandra Bracher formerly Neale, of Church House, West Malling, Kent, and of Clock House, Lunton, Kent, and 33 Earl Street, Maidstone.
Upper IV B—Matriculation Class. House XI Cricket.
Occupation: Solicitor
Corporal of D Coy, 19th Batt, Royal Fusiliers from 2nd Sept 1914 to 15th May 1915. 6th Bn. The Buffs (East Kent Regiment).

'Guy Bracher will always be remembered here for his splendid vitality : he was thoroughly keen and took a wholly unselfish interest in all that concerned the school. In his subsequent career he showed the same perseverance and activity. He received a commission in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment), and was killed in action.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).
Biography
Service record: WO 339/3610

Photo of Alwyn Bramley-Moore
Corporal Alwyn Bramley-Moore
House: No 6, 1893 - 1895. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 04 April 1916 aged 38 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Boulogne East V111 D 91

Son of the Rev. William Bramley-Moore; husband of Nellie Bramley Moore, of 10729, 98th Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta and 26 Russell Square, W.C. Born in London 1878.
Lower V—VI. Minor Scholar. School Prefect. House XI Football.
Farmer in Canada.
He was a politician in Alberta Canada and wrote about the exploitation of Alberta by eastern Canada.
Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment).

He was shot by a German sniper in March 1916 and died in hospital in April 1916.
Biography

Photo of George Clark Briggs
Captain George Clark Briggs
House: No 3, 1893 - 1896. Regiment: Royal Scots Fusliers.
Died: 14 September 1914 aged 36 in France. Killed in action at Vailly-sur-Aisne.
Battle: First Battle of the Aisne. Cemetery: Vailly British 111 A 26

Only son of Francis Briggs, of Huntington, Haddington, East Lothian
Modern II —Upper Modern I. House Prefect. Shooting VIII; House XI Football; Ledbury Cap.
Went to Clare College, Cambridge in 1896.
Royal Scots Fusiliers 1899; Captain 1905 ; South African War 1899-1902, taking part in the relief of Ladysmith and the battle of Colenso; Queen's Medal with 4 Clasps, King's Medal with 2 Clasps.
1st Bn. Royal Scots Fusiliers. Mentioned in Despatches

'He was first reported as missing, but subsequently as having been killed in action ; he was mentioned in the despatches of Sir John French of Oct. 19th.
One who knew him well writes: "He wrote to me pretty regularly for several years. His letters were always delightfully natural and fresh, and he was never disheartened by any contretemps ; indeed the cheery way in which he took disappointments or reverses always struck me, and was one of his attractive features. He was so keen and full of life and vigour—absolutely free of "side," plucky and true as steel." (Malvernian, Nov 1914)

Book: Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students …, Volume 2

Photo of Charles Norman Brockbank
Captain Charles Norman Brockbank
House: Sch, 1899 - 1901. Regiment: Liverpool Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 32 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Dantzig Alley Brit Cemetery Mametz V U 8

Son of Marion Annie Brockbank, of "Ulverscroft," 19, Adelaide Terrace, Waterloo, Liverpool, and the late R. M. Henry Brockbank.
Middle IV—Lower V.
In business in Karachi, India, 1906-11 ;
Partner in William Porter & Co., Liverpool.
Became a partner in his father's firm of African produce merchants.

He enlisted in 1914, became a Captain in March 1916, and was in command of 1 Company, 18th Battalion The King's (Liverpool Regiment) .

'Norman Brockbank was a thoroughly good boy at school; steady, trustworthy, loyal. All his subsequent career has borne out the hopes of his friends, and his ready answer to his country's call was of a piece with his previous record.—S.R.J. After leaving school, he spent five years in business in India, returning afterwards to Liverpool, where he became a partner in the firm of W. Porter and Co., African produce merchants. At the outbreak of the war he trained with the 2nd City Battalion of the Liverpool Regiment. ' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

On the first day of the Battle of the Somme, he led his men into action. He was shot twice by a machine gun and died. It was his 32nd birthday.
After being hit, he refused to seek shelter and asked to remain in the open so that he could continue to cheer on his men.
He was heard shouting "go on, number one" - a memory that stayed with the men of his company.
Biography

Photo of Thomas Pownall Brocklehurst
Captain Thomas Pownall Brocklehurst
House: Sch, 1900 - 1904. Regiment: Royal West Surrey Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 30 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Dantzig Alley Brit Cemetery Mametz Z D 9

Son of Edward and Katharine L. Brocklehurst, of Kinnersley Manor, Reigate, Surrey. b. 1886.
Upper IV—Lower VI.
Trinity Hall, Cambridge ; B.A. (First Class Law Tripos Pt. I.) 1907 ; Second Class Law Tripos Pt. II. 1908 ; LL.B. 1908.

Occupation: Solicitor

Joined the 28th Btn London Regiment as a Private and embarked to France on 24th October 1914. Left on 25th May 1915 to be a 2nd Lieut posted to 2nd Bn Royal West Surrey Rgt.
Promoted to Captain on 20th August 1915.
Wounded in action on 25th September 1915. Sustained a shell wound of the right buttock, the fragment still remaining. An unsuccessful attempt was made at removal on October 5th 1915.
Rejoined Btn in the Field on 15th February 1916
Killed near Mametz. Buried on the on the Mametx-Montarcon Road, 1/2 mile N E of Mametz and 2 miles North West of Mancourt.

'He will be remembered by his contemporaries at School as the possessor of a delightful treble voice and as a pianist of unusual merit. There was a remarkable solidity about his character combined with much personal charm, and the seriousness of purpose which he showed at all times gave high promise for the future. It is no surprise to those who knew him that he has gallantly made the supreme sacrifice.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).
Biography - Surrey in the Geat War

Service record: WO 339/804

Photo of Harry Hickman Bromfield
Major Harry Hickman Bromfield
House: Sch, 1885 - 1888. Regiment: Welsh Guards.
Died: 10 September 1916 aged 47 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 7 D

Son of the late Henry and Mary Elizabeth Bromfield, Newnham Hall, Northants. b. 1869.
Hertford College, Oxford; Captain 3rd South Wales Borderers; served in the South African War 1900-01, Despatches, Queen’s Medal with 3 Clasps, King’s Medal with 2 Clasps, D.S.O. ; retired 1910. Chief Constable of Radnorshire 1909.
Prince of Wales's Coy., 1st Bn. Welsh Guards. D S O.
Husband of Ethel Philippa Bromfield.

'H. H. Bromfield was the eldest of four brothers, who accompanied the Rev. W. Grundy from Warwick on his appointment to the Headmastership of Malvern in 1885: of these four, only J. B. Bromfield, the second brother, now survives. 'Hal' Bromfield, as his friends called him, inherited early in life the entailed estate of Newnham Hall, Northants, but his means were not sufficient to enable him to live on his estate. He served with distinction in the South African War, as an officer in the South Wales Borderers Militia, retiring as Captain and Hon. Major in 1910. In 1906 he married the eldest daughter of Sir Charles Philipps, Bt., of Picton Castle, Haverfordwest, and soon settled down to important public work in Wales. When war broke out he re-joined his old battalion, but, on the formation of the Welsh Guards, he was gazetted to the new regiment, with the rank of Major. He fell in action on September 10th, aged 47. A capable man of action, he was endowed with many personal gifts which rendered him popular both here and throughout his life.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Leaves a widow and a son.
Biography

Photo of Charles Joseph Pearson Brooke
Lieutenant Charles Joseph Pearson Brooke
House: No 7, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Wiltshire Regt..
Died: 03 September 1916 aged 19 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 13A

Son of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Morris Mitchelson Brooke and May Brooke, London House, Dawlish, South Devon, b. 1897.
Army III—I.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 1st Bn Wiltshire Regt. 1915.

'Brooke passed out from Sandhurst into the Wiltshire Regiment in April 1915. He was reported Missing in September 1916 and subsequently posted as having been killed in action on September 3.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

'Lt Brooke was my platoon officer; he was a tall fair fellow and he only joined a week before we went over the top, at Bouzincourt. We went over at Leipzic Salient in the morning and he was hit by a machine gun just after we got over the top, no more than three yards from me. He fell and lay quite still and I took him to be dead. We went on and took the German trench and have held it ever since. We were relieved that evening. The wounded were picked up, but not the dead. Mr Brooke was a very good officer'. (Informant F Salmon B Coy, Sept 10th 1916).
'He was hit in the lower part of his abdomen. He fell on his back and did not speak or move, and there was blood on his clothes. We were not allowed to halt for anything, but I and another man dragged him into a shell-hole for safety. I saw no more of this officer. (Testimony of Pte Salmon).

'Brooke was killed between the lines near Thiepval' (Testimony of Pte Westcott).

Father was at Lucknow, India at time of son's death.

Service record: WO 339/45922

Photo of Crawford Charles Brouncker
2nd Lieut Crawford Charles Brouncker
House: No 7, 1912 - 1915. Regiment: 211 Sq. R. A. F..
Died: 04 November 1918 aged 20 in France. Killed over German lines.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Arras Flying Services Memorial

Born: May 28th 1898, Hither Green. Son of Herbert A. J. Brouncker (Insurance Broker) and Alice Mabel Brouncker, of The Elms, Parkside, Eltham, London and 19 Parksidc, Eltham.
Lower IV—Shell.
Great War (overseas), Private London Scottish ; 2nd Lieutenant R.A.F. 211th Sqdn. Royal Air Force.

'Notwithstanding his diminutive stature, he was a boy of much grit and determination. He obtained a commission in the Flying Corps, and was out on duty, acting as Pilot Officer, on November 4th, 1918, since when nothing has been heard of him.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Service record: WO 339/124287

Photo of Philip Antony Brown
Lieutenant Philip Antony Brown
House: No 6, 1900 - 1905. Regiment: Durham Light Inf..
Died: 04 November 1915 aged 29 in France. Died of wounds near Armentieres.
Cemetery: Ration Farm Armentieres

Born: 27-Jan-1886. Son of Anthony and Jane Chalmers Brown, of "Broomhill," Southend Rd., Beckenham, Kent.
Upper V—VI. House Scholar. English Essay; Hopkinson Reading. School Prefect. Editor of Malvernian. XL Football.
History Scholar, New College, Oxford ; B.A. (Third Class Lit. Hum.) 1908 ; First Class History 1909 ;
Lecturer in Economics in the University of Durham 1912 ; Tutor to the Workers' Educational Association.
Author of ‘The Influence of the French Revolution on English History’.
Great War, Private Duke of Cornwall's L.I. 1914 ; Lieutenant 13th Bn. Durham Light Infantry.

'On leaving Oxford he took up literary work, and was also Lecturer in Economics at Durham University, and a Tutor in the Workers' Educational Association. On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the 8th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, and subsequently obtained a commission in the Durham L.I. He was engaged in observation in front of the trenches at night when he was wounded, and was rescued in circumstances of great heroism by his comrades, but only survived an hour. A boy of unusual charm and force of character, it does not astonish those who knew him here that his Colonel should say that "he was the most popular officer in the regiment with both men and officers, and that his platoon were so angry at the news of his death that they could with difficulty be restrained from going out then and there to avenge him." (Malvernian, Dec 1915).

'He was wounded whilst engaged in observation in front of the trenches at Armentieres, and was rescued under circumstances of great heroism by Private Kenny, his observer, and by Captain White with a party of men. Private (later Sergeant) Kenny was awarded the VC and Captain White the MC.
Lieutenant Brown died of his wounds before he reached the dressing station.'Biography

Photo of Stanley Forrester Browning
Captain Stanley Forrester Browning
House: Sch, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: 41 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 03 May 1917 aged 21 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial LX111 D 5

Born 22nd April 1896. Son of Bertram and Kathleen Browning, of "Rutleigh," 46, Furze Lane, Purley, Surrey.
Lower IV—Modern II. House Prefect. XXII Football.
41st Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps.

'Stanley Browning was a plucky football player, and well liked by his contemporaries in the School House. He showed some independence of character and capacity for leadership, and the Flying Corps was just the career for him. He was killed in action, while flying, on May 3rd.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

He was attacked by a number of German Jastas while on patrol and was killed in an FE8 (A4873).
Biography at purleyandthegreatwar
Ref airwar19141918.

Photo of Robert Hall Brutton
Major Robert Hall Brutton
House: No 2, 1878 - 1881. Regiment: Somerset Light Inf..
Died: 15 January 1916 aged 54 in India. Died on active service in India.
Cemetery: Kirkee 1914-18 Memorial India F 4

Son of Joseph and Elizabeth L. Brutton, of Yeovil, Somerset. b. 1862.
Upper IV—Shell. Exhibitioner. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; House XI Football.

Worked in Father's brewery as 'Maltster, Brewer & Wine Merchant' .
1st/5th Bn. Somerset Light Infantry. T D (Territorial Decoration).

'He was an officer in the Territorial Forces for many years before the war. He died on active service of malaria fever at Amballa, India, on Jan. 15th, 1916. Brutton was one of a generation who came to Drew's house from the west country, and brought with them characteristic cheerfulness and vigour. He had abounding energy and good natural ability, which formed an opening in his business life. He had not been to Malvern for many years, but was a good friend to many O.Ms, in the west, and now when well past middle life he worthily answered the call.' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).
Biography

Photo of Robert Edward Bull
Lieutenant Robert Edward Bull
House: Sch, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: Ox & Bucks Light Inf..
Died: 16 May 1915 aged 21 in France. Killed in action near La Bassee.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P 26

Son of the late Herbert Edward Bull (Brewer) and of Mabel Bull (formerly Bristow), of Castle House, Buckingham, b. 1894.
Lower IV—Army II. School Prefect. XXII Cricket and Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Oxford and Bucks L.I. 1914 ; Lieutenant 1915, 2nd Bn. Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.

'On his captain being killed during an attack, he took command of his company, and was shot through the head on the edge of a German trench, near La Bassee. "Full of life and spirits, he was a popular boy who had many friends, and when placed in a responsible position showed some seriousness of purpose. He bade fair to do really well in his profession. Dis aliter visum (fate had other plans).' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

Service record: WO 339/22611

Photo of Gervas Frederick Bullock
2nd Lieut Gervas Frederick Bullock
House: Sch, 1895 - 1900. Regiment: South Wales Borderers.
Died: 31 July 1917 aged 35 in Belgium. Killed in action at Pilkem Ridge.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 22

Son of F. D. O. Bullock, 59 Mount Park Road, Ealing, b. 1882.
Lower V—Remove. Minor Scholar. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football; Shooting V I I I ; XL Cricket. Lieutenant in Corps. Corpus Christi College, Cambridge ; B.A. ; was in Ceylon.
Great War, Private Inns of Court O.T.C. 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant 1915 11th Bn. South Wales Borderers.

'He was in Ceylon when war was declared and came home to join the Inns of Court O. T. C. Receiving his commission in the South Wales Borderers in January 1916, he went to the front in the following June. He was killed in action on July 31st, 1917.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Photo of Robert Stanley Bullock
Captain Robert Stanley Bullock
House: No 6, 1902 - 1907. Regiment: 27th Punjabis Inf. (I. A.).
Died: 17 April 1916 aged 27 in India. Killed in action at Beit Aiessa.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 54

Elder son of Frederick Shore Bullock (Indian Civil Service) and Alexandrina Margaret Bullock, b. 1889.
Lower V—VI—Army Side. Minor Scholar. School Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; attached to South Wales Borderers 1907 ;
Indian Army (27th Punjabis) 1908 ; Captain 1916.
Persian Interpreter to Government of India 1913.

'On the outbreak of war he served on the Staff in Egypt and with his regiment in France, and later again with his regiment in part of the Kut Relief Force in Mesopotamia, where he fell on April 17th, 1916, while gallantly leading his men. As a school boy he was universally liked and respected, and no more loyal Malvernian lived than he. His tastes seemed so entirely literary that it was a surprise to his friends to hear that he was adopting the Army as a profession. It is doubtful whether his heart was ever in military work. Indeed he had already decided to take up the political side of our administration in India, for which his natural aptitude for languages and his intense interest in Indian and Eastern problems would seem to have well qualified him, but was recalled to his regiment on the outbreak of war. Many will remember his exciting experiences a few years ago on the occasion of his leading an embassy to Ispahan, how he was attacked by bandits, and his escort shot down, and how after thrilling adventures he finally reached his destination. The incident created considerable stir in the press, and, we doubt not, at our India Office. To a striking charm of manner he added a keen intelligence which would have carried him far in the public service. It would not have been difficult to predict for him a life of very considerable distinction. He had specialised, if one may so put it, in the politics of Persia—that derelict among nations—in so far as they affected our Eastern Empire, and his correspondence was of the utmost interest, revealing, as it did, the deep study of a keen mind, and not a little originality of conception.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).
Gravestone memorial at Brompton Cemetery

Photo of John Heywood Burgoyne
2nd Lieut John Heywood Burgoyne
House: No 9, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 31 October 1916 aged 19 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Aveluy Communal Extension L 46

Born September 25th 1897. Son of J. W. H. Burgoyne.
Upper IV—Modern I. School Prefect. XL Football; Shooting VIII (captain) ; Cadet Officer.
88th Bde. Royal Field Artillery.

Address Wellers, Ashington, Sussex.

'Shortly after leaving school he obtained a commission in the R.F.A., and it was in the performance of the most dangerous duty which falls to the lot of an artillery officer that he lost his life. In letters received from his Colonel and Battery officers mention is made in every case of his popularity in the Battery, and of his gallantry. "A splendid soldier, and absolutely without fear," wrote his Battery Commander. "We were all extremely fond of him in the Mess, where he was always good-tempered, unselfish, and thoughtful for others." To have won that is to have won all. A man is his true self at the Front; moreover, this is the Jack Burgoyne that we knew.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Next of kin: Lorna Heywood Burgoyne (sister) and Miss B Morgan (Aunt-Guardian), Wellers, Ashington, Sussex

Service Record: WO 339/49394

Photo of Edward William Burke
2nd Lieut Edward William Burke
House: No 2, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: 70 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 14 September 1916 aged 19 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Gezaincourt Communal Extension 1 E 12

Only Son of Mr. and Mrs. William C. Burke, of Cloonee, Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, b. 1897.
Middle Shell-Lower VI. School Prefect. Head of House. House XI Football.
He entered Sandhurst in May, 1915, and received his commission in November, 1915.
70th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and 6th Bn. Royal Fusiliers.

Sisters: Rose (age 12) & Olivia (age 8) in 1916.

'On passing out of Sandhurst in November 1915, Edward Burke joined his regiment at Dover, where he remained until he was attached to the R.F.C. in March 1916, when he began his training in the air. In July he was sent to the front. In the seven weeks he was out, he made many flights over the enemy's lines and won a great name for himself, as he was absolutely without fear. His pilot, Capt. Patrick, of the 70th Squadron, R.F.C., thus records the gallant way in which he died: "I selected him as my observer before all the others as he was one of the very best. We and another machine were somewhat behind on a reconnaissance when a strong hostile patrol came up and attacked the other machine. As the pilot was young and inexperienced, I turned to help him. We kept off the enemy, your son fighting like a hero. It was then that he was hit. He became unconscious but he recovered consciousness, and no sooner had he done so than he started working his Lewis gun, and actually fired another drum of ammunition before again losing consciousness. Your son was dead when he reached the ground. He was buried at Gezaincourt." Every letter from the front tells the same story of his pluck and reliability as an observer. But these letters also show how keenly his loss is felt for personal reasons. One of the 70th Squadron writes: "For some time past Paddy had been the life of the mess, and I do not expect ever to come across a more charming boy." The number of friends he had made in his short career is remarkable. He had a most attractive personality; his impulsive boyishness and his cheerful outlook on life made him a delightful companion. His many school friends, as well as his army friends, deeply regret his loss, and would wish to record their sympathy with his father and mother.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

The Burke Prize for Military Efficiency was founded from a bequest by him:
'In honour of the memory of his son, E. W. Burke (No 2) 2nd Lt. 6th Bn. Royal Fusiliers and R.F.C., who was killed in Sept. 1916, W. C. Burke, Esq., O.M., has given the sum of £50, left by his son, to be at the disposal of the Cadet Corps. The money will be used to establish an efficiency prize in the Corps, which will be called the Burke Prize.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).
Biography at South Dublin Libraries

Service Record: WO 339/54935

Photo of Richard Eldon Bush
Lieutenant Richard Eldon Bush
House: No 1, 1906 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Naval Air Service.
Died: 24 April 1917 aged 26 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed.
Cemetery: Keynsham Cemetery Bristol PINK D 712

Born: January 1st 1891. Son of Philip Wathen Bush and Maria Louisa Bush, of The Old Manor House, Keynsham Bristol.
Middle Shell—Upper Shell.
St. John's College, Cambridge ; afterwards in Canada.
Architect.
Great War, Private Artists Rifles 1914 ; Flight-Lieutenant Royal Naval Air Service.

'On leaving School, where he displayed considerable mechanical aptitude, Richard Bush went to St. John's, Cambridge, but left there for Canada without proceeding to a degree. On his return home he studied architecture for six months. When war broke out he joined the Artists' Rifles, from which he obtained a commission in the R.N.A.S. A bad accident after 17 months' flying incapacitated him for a time. Returning to duty he was given the command of a new seaplane station. Here, while taking a flight he failed to clear some overhead wires, his machine was smashed against the cliff and set alight. With great pluck and coolness he kept the men who had rushed to his assistance at a distance, as there were still unexploded bombs in the burning machine. But the shock was too great and he only lived 36 hours'. (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Gained Aviators Certificate on 20 August 1915 at Royal Naval Flying School, Eastchurch. He was one of the first airmen to be based at Fishguard Naval Air Station RNAS, and on his first flight there took off in a Sopwith Baby seaplane, N1033, which had been fitted with a new engine, on the morning of 22 April 1917 on a test flight, carrying a full load of bombs, but the seaplane failed to gain height at take off and struck power cables, which sent it crashing into the cliff face. Two 16 pound bombs exploded. Pilot was Badly Burnt.
Biography at Canada at war RAF Museum Final Flights

Photo of Francis Thomas Darrel Cade
Captain Francis Thomas Darrel Cade
House: No 9, 1909 - 1914. Regiment: Hampshire Regt..
Died: 06 September 1916 aged 22 in France. Killed in action at Ginchy on the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 7/

Born October 8th 1894. Son of Sidney Edward Percy and Ethel Cade, of Titchfield, Fareham, Hants.
Upper IV B—Science I. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Football; House XI Cricket. Cadet Officer.
Matriculated from University of London in 1913
11th Bn. Hampshire Regiment.

'Darrel Cade was about to join London University when war broke out. In September 1914, he was gazetted to a commission in the Hampshire Regiment, and was promoted Lieutenant in the July. His name appeared in The Gazette, as Captain (to date from January) on September 12th, one week after he was killed. His Company Commander wrote of him: "He did not know what fear was, I have never seen him in the slightest degree perturbed in any circumstances." His Colonel described him as one of the best of his young officers, adding that he was a universal favourite with the officers and with the men. What Darrel Cade was as a soldier, that he was as a boy and prefect. Behind a gentleman there was real strength. The high sense of duty, which he not only possessed, but kept alive, while at School, was not likely to fail him in a supreme hour. That it did not fail him, those who were with him when he fell, shot at close quarters, bear generous witness. He was killed in action on September 6th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Service Record: WO 339/19679

Photo of Ronald Hugh Carden
2nd Lieut Ronald Hugh Carden
House: No 3, 1908 - 1912. Regiment: Wiltshire Regt..
Died: 14 March 1915 aged 21 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P47

Born 3rd April 1894. Son of Charles Hugh and Emily Carden, of Newnham Lodge, Royston Park Rd., Hatch End, Middlesex, and 28 Onslow Gardens, Muswell Hill.
Upper Shell—Matriculation Class. Minor Scholar. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Cricket and Football.Senior swimming team. Cadet Officer.
In business.
Great War, Private Artists Rifles 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant Wilts Regt. Special List attd. 2nd Bn. Wiltshire Regiment.

'On leaving School he entered the office of R. G. Shaw & Co., of Winchester House, and in August he joined the Artists' Rifles as a private. Shortly after arriving in France he was given a commission in the 2nd Wiltshire Regiment. Later he was in charge of the machine guns of his Regiment, and was killed in action on March 14th. Of exceptional strength of character, single-minded, manly and true, Ronald Carden inspired and deserved the affection and trust of all who knew him here. ' (Malvernian, Apr 1915).

Killed at the battle of Neuve Chapelle.
Biography
-

Photo of Arthur John Edward Carey
2nd Lieut Arthur John Edward Carey
House: No 1, 1909 - 1914. Regiment: Gordon Highlanders.
Died: 22 August 1917 aged 22 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P 135-136

Born: May 5th 1896 in the Federal Malay State (now Singapore)
Son of Helen Carey, of Springvale, Whitchurch, Oxon., and the late Edward Valentine Carey, Carey, Lyne, Capel, Surrey.
Lower IV—Science I. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket; XI Football; Champion Athlete. Cadet Officer.
Great War, Private Inns of Court, O.T.C. 1914 ; R.M.C. Sandhurst;
3rd Bn. attd. 8th/10th Bn. Gordon Highlanders .

'Jack Carey was a prominent member of the School from his first term, when he played in his House junior Cricket team, until he left as Head of the House. His intention on leaving School was to go at once to Cambridge and take the Science Tripos, with a view of developing the rubber estates founded by his father; upon the outbreak of war, however, he "joined up," and having received his commission, he was sent to France where he soon gained his second star. He met his death whilst leading his men by receiving a hit on the head by a piece of shell. His Commanding Officer speaks highly of his calmness and courage in action and of his popularity as an Officer.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).
Biography at Dorking museum

Photo of Edward Maurice Carter
Captain Edward Maurice Carter
House: No 7, 1910 - 1912. Regiment: 11th Lancers (I. A.).
Died: 11 August 1920 aged 24 in Iraq. Treacherously killed at Tel Afar, Mesopotamia.
Cemetery: Baghdad North XV111 L 8

Son of the Rev. George Charles Carter, of The Rectory, Bartlow, Cambs, b. 1896.
Middle IV—Lower Modern II.
Farm Pupil.
Great War, Private Public Schools' Batt. 1914 ; Lieutenant Durham L.I.; Captain I.A. 11th King Edward's Own Lancers (Probyn's Horse).

He was killed during the rising at Tal Afar in northern Iraq after that place was included in Iraq. Tal Afar was used as a base of operations for a planned revolt against the then ruling British.
Biography

Photo of Ronald William St. George Cartwright
2nd Lieut Ronald William St. George Cartwright
House: No 9, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: 16 Sq. R. A. F..
Died: 26 February 1918 aged 24 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension V1 J B

Born 29 March 1894. Son of Arthur Cartwright (H.M. Inspector of Schools in Worcestershire) and Ellen Mabel Cartwright, of Rothbury, Hay, Hereford
Lower Modern II—Modern I.
Farmer in Canada.
Great War, Private Canadian Infantry 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant 16th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and General List.

'On leaving school Cartwright took up farming, and eventually went out to British Columbia. He had only been there a few months when war broke out. He joined up immediately in Victoria, and came over with the Canadian contingent early in 1915. After only a few days in England, his company was ordered to the front, and soon came into action. On one occasion Cartwright was buried by a big shell. Shortly afterwards he was invalided home, where he underwent an operation for appendicitis. He suffered from shell shock for eighteen months, but made a marvellous recovery; almost before he was really fit again, he obtained a commission in the R.F.C. and went to the front in September 1917. He was killed in action on February 26th. Modesty, vivacity, pluck were all strongly marked in him, and he was a general favourite wherever he was.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Service Record: AIR 79/745/82127 and AIR 76/79/36
Biography at Canadian-virtual-war-memorial

Photo of Hugh Lancelot Cass
2nd Lieut Hugh Lancelot Cass
House: No 2, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: South Wales Borderers.
Died: 19 June 1915 aged 24 in Turkey. Killed in action at Dardanelles.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Twelve Tree Copse, Dardenelles

Son of B. Cass, Secunderabad, Deccan. B. 1891.
Lower V—Lower VI. House Scholar. Shooting VIII ; House XI Cricket.
Assistant Manager, Oxford University Press, Indian Branch ; later with Lyon, Lord & Co., Bombay ; 2nd Lieutenant, General Reserve of Officers.
Great War, Sergeant 1914, 2nd Lieutenant 2nd Bn. South Wales Borderers.

'On leaving school he trained with the Inns of Court O.T.C., and before going to India in 1912 as Assistant Manager of the Indian Branch of the Oxford University Press, he was gazetted Second Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers. On the outbreak of war he volunteered his services as Sergeant pending his being gazetted to a regiment, and served in France throughout the autumn and winter. He was gazetted Second Lieutenant 3rd South Wales Borderers in February ; and in May, having been attached to the 2nd Battalion of that regiment, joined in at the Dardanelles, where he fell on June 19th.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

Medal card: WO 372/4/47955

Photo of Arthur Ardagh Cassidy
2nd Lieut Arthur Ardagh Cassidy
House: No 3, 1904 - 1907. Regiment: South African Inf..
Died: 19 July 1917 aged 27 in Africa. Killed in action at Narlingombi, G.E.A..
Battle: East African Campaign. Cemetery: Dar-Es Salaam

Son of Marie Emily Cassidy, of Johannesburg, and the late Arthur Ardagh Cassidy, 55 Charlton Road, Blackheath. b. 1890.
Upper IV—Science Form. House Prefect. Gymnasium Colours ; House XI Cricket and Football.
Formerly in business in Vancouver ; then in South Africa.
Great War, Private South African Forces (German S.W. Africa); Lieutenant (E. Africa). 8th Regt. South African Infantry formerly Transvaal Scottish, S.A. Forces
Commissioned Aug., 1915. Twice previously wounded.

'Ardagh Cassidy brought with him from South Africa an ease of manner and conversation that made him a cheerful companion. He was a boy of great activity and was particularly prominent in the Gymnasium. In this war he served first as a Private in the German West African Campaign, during which he was twice slightly wounded. When that was over, he trained for a commission and was sent to German East Africa, where he contracted dysentery and was invalided from January to May 1917. After the battle in the following July he was seen to be wounded and walking back to the dressing station. No further details have come to hand.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918)

Photo of John Charles Ashford Caunter
Captain John Charles Ashford Caunter
House: No 7, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: 60 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 28 October 1917 aged 20 in Belgium. Killed in action near Passchendale.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Arras Flying Services Memorial

Son of Brig. Gen. J. E. Caunter, C.B., C.B.E., and Mrs. Caunter, of "Elm Bank", St. Mary Church, Devon, b. 1897.
Upper IV—Army II. Shooting VIII ; House XI Cricket.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Welch Regt. 1914 ; Captain 1917 ; attached 60th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps.

Address: 26 Nicholas Street, Chester.

'Owing to the outbreak of war Caunter left School earlier than he had intended, passed through Sandhurst and joined his father's old Regiment—the Welch—at the end of 1914. After serving on the Eastern and Western fronts, he joined the Flying Corps, and had only been with them a short time when he was shot down, on October 25, 1917. At School he was a boy of more than average merit, a promising bowler and a good shot. These qualities he turned to good account in the war, showing considerable ability as a pilot and giving promise of greater things to come.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

Joined 1st Btn Welch Regiment in the field on 8/10/15
Disembarked at Salonica via Marseilles & Alexandria on 27/11/15
Embarked for Egypt on transfer to RFC at Salonica on 26/11/16
Killed in action on Passchendaele Ridge

Service record: WO 339/3550
Biography

Photo of Lancelot Phillip Charles
CSM Lancelot Phillip Charles
House: No 6, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: Honourable Artillery Company.
Died: 14 November 1916 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Varennes I E 40

Son of Frederick and Julie Charles, of 153, High St., Waltham Cross, Herts and 10 Netherhall Gardens, Hampstead, N.W. b. 1896.
Middle IV—Modern II.
In business.
Great War, Private H.A.C. 1914, Sergeant-Major. 1st Bn. Honourable Artillery Company.

'As a boy at school he rose to no great distinction either at work or play, but his downright honest nature made him respected and popular. He joined the H.A.C. as a private at the beginning of the war, and had more experience of trench warfare than most people. Except for a short leave after being wounded, his active service was without a break for over two years, and he had been promoted to Colour Sergt.-Major. He was mortally wounded on November 13th, and died the next day.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Photo of Ambrose Childs Clarke
2nd Lieut Ambrose Childs Clarke
House: No 2, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 09 May 1915 aged 19 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Packhorse Farm West Vlaanderen F 1

Son of W. A. Clarke, The Homestead, Manor Road, Leicester, b. 1896.
Lower Modern II—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. XL Football.
Articled to a Solicitor.
1st/4th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment

'His last thought was for others, for when his trench came under fire , he refused to take shelter until he had seen all his men were under cover. He had just got the last man to a place of safety when he was killed… He was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant last August at the age of 17. His keenness and capability had already won him the reputation of being one of the most promising young officers in the regiment.’ (The Malvernian, Jun 1915)
Biography

Photo of Charles St Aubyn Clarke
2nd Lieut Charles St Aubyn Clarke
House: Sch, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Indian Army.
Died: 30 July 1918 aged 20 in India. Died at Agra.
Cemetery: Agra

Born May 29th 1898, Wentworth, Yorkshire
Father: Robert William Clarke (Mining and Civil Engineer in India, and in 1916 T.C.O Staff Captain in France), Thurcroft Hall, Rotherham.
Mother: Mrs R W Clarke, Tembrani, Redcliffe Road, Paignton, S. Devon
Lower IV—Lower Modern II.
Sheffield University.
Occupation: Engineer's apprentice at Vickers Ltd, Sheffield

'Charles Clarke survived his brother but six months. We reprint the following from the Malvernian of last March :— " The two brothers Clarke were boys of high character and distinct promise. Their School career was unavoidably shortened but they both accomplished enough to prove that they would turn out sound men. Their subsequent career has justified this expectation, as the writer has reason to know.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

He was commissioned in August 1915 in the service of the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps.
In February 1917 he was in the Machine Gun Corps. He fought in the First World War between July 1917 and October 1917, in France, and then transferred to the 74th Punjabis in November 1917 in the Indian Army.

He died at Station Hospital, Agra, Bengal, India, from endocarditis.
Ref the Peerage

Service Record: WO 339/76041 Machine Gun Corps

Photo of Maurice Tredway Clarke
Private Maurice Tredway Clarke
House: No 7, 1896 - 1897. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 23 April 1915 aged 32 in Belgium. Died of wounds at Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Vlamertinghe New Mil Cemetery 1 F 16

Born: March 22nd 1884. Son of Tredway Sydenham Clarke and Constance Clarke, of Eagle Butte, Alberta, and Westbourne Gardens, W.
Lower V—Middle V. Exhibitioner.
Exhibitioner, St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, 1902 ; B.A. (Third Class Classical Tripos) 1905 ;
Forestry Branch, Canada, 1910 ; Game Guardian for the province of Alberta 1911.

Went to Canada in 1905 and took up land near Eagle Butte , Medicine Hat , Alberta -Rancher
In 1910 he obtained an appointment under the Dominion Forestry Department which he held until September 1913.
10th Bn. Canadian Infantry .
Biography Ypres-salient Canadian great war project Eastbourne College

Photo of Robert Shuttleworth Clarke
Captain Robert Shuttleworth Clarke
House: Sch, 1903 - 1909. Regiment: Shropshire Light Inf..
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 25 in Belgium. Died of wounds near Hooge.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 47/49

Born 22nd April 1890, Ross, Herefordshire
Son of the Rev. William Shuttleworth Clarke, M.A., Vicar of Marstow, Ross, Herefordshire, and Maria Brandram,
Upper IV—Middle V. Junior Chapel Prefect. Head of House. Champion Athlete; XXII Football; XL Cricket. Lieutenant in Corps.
St. John's College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1912 ; President C.U.A.C.; ran the Mile 1911-13, and the Cross-Country Race 1911 v. Oxford; ran the Two Miles for Oxford and Cambridge v. Yale and Harvard 1911 . He came 2nd in the mile and won the 3 miles in 1912.
Assistant Master Golden Parsonage Preparatory School, Hemel Hempstead.
Great War, Private 1914, afterwards Captain D Coy, 5th Bn. King's Shropshire Light Infantry.

'Robert Clarke was one of those who make more friends than acquaintances. He was a man of few words, but his conversation often revealed the enthusiasm of the man of action. Living a hard, clean life he delighted in honest sport, both for himself and for those children of rich and poor alike whom he helped to train up to true manhood. It was characteristic of him that when war began he chose to learn soldiering in the ranks. To his own personality he owed his corporal's stripes, his Colonel's recommendation for a commission, and his subsequent promotion. And as he had lived, so he died, handing on the lamp of life to those who shall succeed him. He was killed on September 25th. ' (Malvernian, Dec 1915).

L/Corpl. C. Kelcowyn wrote, “On September 25 we were ordered to take two lines of trenches; we advanced about dawn and captured the first line. Just then I was struck by a bursting shell. Captain Clarke was struck by the same shell. He was hit in several places. We crawled into the communication trench and lay there. Captain Clarke had his flask with him and he gave me some drink from it. He said, ‘Cheer up, lad,’ and I think he died from loss of blood.” And Sergt. F. Langford, “From the men who came out of the charge on 25 September and were near him at the time I know how magnificently he fought, he died a hero. This is how his memory is revered in this battalion.”

Service record: WO 339/19681
Unit War Diary: WO-95-1902-1
Memorial Baroque tablet on the South wall of St Matthew, Marstow

Biography: Menin Gate North: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman

Photo of William Andrews St Aubyn Clarke
Sub Lieutenant William Andrews St Aubyn Clarke
House: Sch, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Died: 30 December 1917 aged 20 in France. Killed in action at Cambrai.
Cemetery: Flesquieres Hill V C 16

Born in Coonoor India in 1897 to Captain Robert William Clarke Royal Engineers and Dorothy Ann St Aubyn late of Thurcroft Hall, Rotherham .
Middle IV—Modern II.
Engineer

'Clarke was serving with the Machine Guns. One night when there was snow on the ground the enemy crept up in white smocks and caps and pressed their attack home with considerable numbers. The men in the front line had no chance and Clarke was killed instantaneously, gallantly working his gun to the last. The two brothers Clarke were boys of high character and distinct promise. Their School career was unavoidably shortened, but they both accomplished enough to prove that they would turn out sound men. Their subsequent career has justified this expectation, as the writer has reason to know. Now they are parted for a time. At School they were always together.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

Joined the Public School Battalion of the Royal Naval Division in May 1915 obtaining a commission in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve as sub-lieutenant in the following November in 63rd Royal Naval Division 190th Brigade Machine Gun Corps.
He was killed on 30th December 1917 at the battle of Cambrai.
His commanding officer wrote to his mother - "I cannot tell you how it grieves me to inform you of the death of your son beside his guns, fighting the enemy to the last. Your son has served under me for a considerable time, and I always admired him for his strength of will and capabilities. A naturally shy, reserved officer he was popular with us all, and we shall all miss him terribly. I believe he died in a very gallant manner".
Biography at invisionzone

Photo of John Osborne Price Clarkson
2nd Lieut John Osborne Price Clarkson
House: No 6, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: 13th Hussars.
Died: 10 March 1917 aged 22 in Iraq. Killed in action.
Battle: British capture Baghdad. Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 1

Born 30th October 1895, Nasik, Bombay
Father: John Wilkins Clarkson (Lt Colonel Indian Army)
Mother: Mrs. Eva M. L. Clarkson, The Hut, Esher (widow)
Modern III—Army I.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 13th Hussars 1914.

'He passed 15th into Sandhurst, taking a Prize Cadetship in July 1914. He received his commission in December 1914, and shortly afterwards went to the front in France. After a considerable period of training behind the lines he found his chance of active warfare in the recent retreat of the enemy from the Somme front, and was one of the first of the cavalry to fall. He was killed in action on March 10. He was a bright boy at School, full of mental and physical activity, and, one would imagine, the real type of a cavalry officer.' (Malvernian, Apr 1917).

Address: Westbourne, Lee on Solent, Hants
Joined Regt in France on 25th October 1915 via Southampton and Rouen.
On 27th June 1916, embarked at Marseilles and disembarked at Basrah on 26th July 1916.

Service record: WO 339/23625

NB the 13th Hussars were involved with the capture of Baghdad in March 1917, so it seems the memorial book inscription ' of 'Killed in action at the Somme' is a mistake.Ref
-

Photo of Frank Cecil Clegg
Captain Frank Cecil Clegg
House: Sch, 1902 - 1907. Regiment: Border Regt..
Died: 22 August 1915 aged 27 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 119-125

Born: 15 Feb 1888, Shire House. Son of Calder Hurst Clegg (Cotton Manufacturer) of Shire House, Littleborough, Westmorland and Haverbrack, Milnthorpe, Westmorland.
Mother: Mary Ann Clegg formerly Thompson
Brother: Edmund Berwick Clegg
Lower Shell—Lower VI. School Prefect. XXII Football;
Lieutenant in Corps.
Brasenose College, Oxford ; B.A. (Third Class Jurisprudence) 1910 ;
Solicitor 1914.
6th Bn. Border Regiment.
Address: Hawes Mead, Kendal

'He joined the Army at the outbreak of the war, being given a commission in the 6th Border Regiment. He was gazetted temporary Captain in May, and left almost immediately for the Dardanelles. He was remarkable for a sturdy honesty of character, outspoken in conversation, and independent in action. Though he felt it bitterly when he was unable to continue his athletic career, he had many other interests. His loss will be great to those who knew him well. He was a delightful companion and a very loyal friend, much attached to his old school and interested in all that concerned Malvern. He was killed on August 22nd, aged 27.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record: WO 339/11511

Photo of Ronald Malcolm Clerk
Captain Ronald Malcolm Clerk
House: Sch, 1900 - 1901. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 09 April 1917 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at Arras.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Faubourg D'amiens, Arras V11 G 15

Born: 28th October 1885 in Paddington, London
Son of J. Somervail Clerk and Dora Somervail Clerk (nee Carew), of Foresters, Windlesham, Surrey and 16 Porchester Terrace, W.
Middle IV—Army IV.
Merton College, Oxford; B.A. (Fourth Class History) 1908 ;
Assistant Master at Sutherland House School, Windlesham ;
Great War, Captain King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) attd. 6th Bn. The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment).

The Times: 'In August, 1914, he obtained a commission in the Royal West Surrey Regiment, and went with his battalion to the front in June, 1915. Promoted to Captain in July, 1915, he was invalided home after an operation for appendicitis, and was obliged to remain at home until last June, when he re-joined his regiment. In July he was slightly wounded, and in December he was recommended for, and obtained, a commission (Regulars) in the King's (Royal Lancaster Regiment) as Captain; but remained with his old battalion in the Queen's.
His commanding officer writes: "Your son was killed on the morning of April 9, to the lasting sorrow of his many friends here. His death was almost instantaneous. . . . His loss will be felt very deeply by us all. . . . He played the game until the last, dying most gallantly at the head of his company."

He was killed at Arras whilst leading his company into action.
Biography

Photo of Carleton Lumley St. Clair Clery
2nd Lieut Carleton Lumley St. Clair Clery
House: No 3, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: Liverpool Regt..
Died: 12 March 1915 aged 20 in France. Killed in action at Richebourg.
Cemetery: Richebourg Le Touret Richebourg-St. Vaast Churchyard Mem.

Son of Maj. Gen. Carleton B. L. Clery and Mrs. Jessie Violet Clery.
Army II—I. Minor Scholar. House Prefect. XL Cricket.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Indian Army 1914.
Great War, attached King's (Liverpool) Regt.

'He was gazetted Second Lieutenant on the Unattached List of the Indian Army, but was temporarily attached to the 4th Bn. Liverpool Regiment. He had been at the front only a week when he was struck by a shell at Richebourg. He was in his 20th year. He made many friends at Malvern, some of whom are still at the School, and all will mourn the briefness of his career as a soldier to which personal inclination and family tradition called him. ' (Malvernian, Apr 1915).

From the Battalion War Diary:
'On 11 March, 1915, at about 8pm, 4 King’s (Liverpool) Regt left Vieille Chapelle and made their way to Richebourg St Vaaste where they billeted at about midnight. The Battalion was shelled heavily by the Germans the following day which resulted in the following casualties: 2nd Lt Carleton Lumley St Clair Clery (Unattached List Indian Army attd 4 KLR) killed, 2nd Lt Thomas Guy Pocock wounded, 2 other ranks were killed and 13 wounded.' Ref

Photo of Robert Henry Collyns
Major Robert Henry Collyns MC
House: No 2, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 01 June 1918 aged 24 in France. Died of wounds at Jon Chery.
Cemetery: Terlincthun Brit Mil Wimille A C 7

Born: August 7th 1894. Son of Robert John and Eleanor Maud Collyns, of Bilboa, Dulverton, Somerset.
Lower Modern II—Modern I.
Bristol University ; B.Sc. 1914.
97th Field Coy. Royal Engineers
M C & Chevalier Legion D'Honneur (France).

Address: 8 Richmond Hill, Clifton, Bristol

'Although he left Malvern rather young, his abilities and industry had already secured him a high place in the School, and those who had watched his progress here fully expected that he would do well in his later career. In July 1914 he took the degree of Bachelor of Science at Bristol University. He obtained a commission in Jan. 1915, and went to France in the following October. He was wounded twice before he received the wound from which he died. He was mentioned in despatches on Dec. 17, 1917, and was awarded the Military Cross on May 28, 1918.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Military cross citation: 'While in command of the company during enemy attacks he showed great coolness and ability in command of his men, and on the third day was dangerously wounded while distributing them in a new position. His example throughout was of a high order.'

May 27th 1918. Chalons le Verguer. The sections and attached infantry, commanded by Capt R H Collyns RE left under orders to report to 110th Inf Bde and thereafter came under the orders of the 64th Inf Bde and were detailed to act with 15th DLI in holding the line of the light railway west of Cauroy.

May 29th 1918. Capt R H Collyns RE severely wounded holding main line of Railway at Muizon on the Vesle River.

Died of wounds received in action on May 29th 1918.
Memorial in Dulverton Church.

Service Record: WO 339/109012
Medal Card: WO 372/4/217557
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2144/1

Photo of George Burton Cook
Lieutenant George Burton Cook
House: No 6, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: 20th Hussars.
Died: 23 March 1918 aged 24 in France. Killed in action at Jussy.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: St Souplet 1 H 19

Son of Arthur Burton Cook and Alice Anne Cook, of "Sunlea," Sheringham, Norfolk, b. 1894.
Lower IV—Upper IV B.
R.A.C. Cirencester.
Farmer in Vancouver.
Great War, Trooper County of London Yeomanry 1914 ; Lieutenant 20th Hussars.

'Shortly after leaving School, he went to Canada to farm. On the outbreak of war he returned to this country, and enlisted as a Trooper in the County of London Yeomanry, with whom he saw service in Egypt and Gallipoli, where he was wounded. Later, he received a commission in a Hussar regiment, with whom he served about eighteen months in France. He was killed in action on March 25th. His Colonel after a recent battle wrote in high terms of his fighting qualities. Himself the son of an O.M., no one was keener on his old School. He was a quiet, reserved boy at School, with a hand always ready to help anyone.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Unit War Diary 20 Hussars: WO 95/1140/2

Photo of George Trevor Roper Cook
Lieutenant Colonel George Trevor Roper Cook CMG DSO
House: No 5, 1892 - 1895. Regiment: 20th Hussars.
Died: 26 March 1918 aged 41 in France. Killed in action at Dives.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 6

Son of George Ward Cook, of Hoylake; husband of Alice Cook (nee Dorman), of The Dower House, Quatt, Bridgnorth, Salop and Greenham Cottage, Hoylake. b. 1877.
Upper IV — Army Side. School Prefect. House XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst 3rd Dragoon Guards 1897; Major 20th
Hussars 1911; South African War 1899—1902, Queen’s Medal with 3 Clasps.
Great War, Lieut.-Colonel Commanding 20th Hussars;
C.M.G., D.S.O., Croix de Guerre, Despatches (4).

'His chief love as a boy was for horses, a love which he inherited from his father—who also was a Malvernian—in fact one of the first boys to enter the School, having joined No. 1 (McDowall's) the first term the School opened 1865. As a school boy Trevor was a popular all round boy, and was one of a set in No. 5 whose school friendship were long maintained in after life. In sympathy with his love for horses Trevor Cook made up his mind from the first to get a commission in the Cavalry. He was with the 3rd Dragoons in South Africa. During his service in the present war he was twice mentioned in despatches, and was awarded the D.S.O. in 1915. He was killed in action last March.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

In March 1918 during the German Spring Offensive, two mixed cavalry regiments were commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, called Cook's Detachment. They acted as a relief force, and were ordered on 26th March 1918 to mount up and ride to Cattigny to help the French who retired. The Germans surrounded the detachment and overwhelmed them. George Cook was killed in the fighting and his body was never identified.
Biography at British Empire site

Unit War Diary 20 Hussars: WO 95/1140/2

Captain Alan Welldon Cooke
House: -, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Durham Light Inf..
Died: 25 March 1918 aged in France. -.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial

Born: 15th Oct 1886
Father: Rev Alfred Hands Cooke
Address: Aldenham School, Elstree and Clydesdal, Priory Rd, Malvern
22nd Bn. Durham Light Infantry.
Left W Beach, Cape Helles, Gallipoli on August 7th 1915, and was in hospital in Alexandria from August 10th to November 1st suffering from a gunshot wound in the foot, followed by gastritis, and general debility.

The battalion entrained at Poperinghe near Ypres on the 22nd March 1918 for the Somme.
At 6.45pm on the 24th March they were 500 yards west of Potte Wood and across the Pertain-Morchain road.
At 9am on the 25th March, the enemy attacked in strength and it was found necessary to withdraw owing to own flanks being isolated, and a line was taken on the NE of Pertain which after being held for about an hour, again with flanks in the air, it was decided to retire on to Omiecourt. The position was taken up about 12 noon and held until orders were issued for the Bn to withdraw at 4pm to Chaulnes Rioge NE of Chaulnes.
Estimated casualties: 14 officers and 400 Other Ranks.

Killed in action near Monchy in France.

Service Record: WO 339/2039
Medal Card: WO 372/4/245708
Unit War Diary 22 Battalion Durham Light Infantry:WO 95/1702/1

Photo of Charles Ernest Cooke
2nd Lieut Charles Ernest Cooke
House: No 2, 1899 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Irish Fusiliers.
Died: 25 May 1915 aged 31 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 42

Son of Alexander and E. J. Cooke, of Nottinghill House, Malone Road, Belfast,b. 1884.
Lower Modern II—I.
Formerly in the Linen Trade ; afterwards served in British South African Police, S. Rhodesia.

Prior to 1914 he served with the South African Police and was assisting as Adjutant in the Ulster Volunteer Force upon the outbreak of war.
3rd Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers
Mentioned in Despatches

Ref: IWM Bond of Sacrifice

Photo of Arthur Miles Gilpin Cooper
2nd Lieut Arthur Miles Gilpin Cooper
House: No 7, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Berks' Regt..
Died: 23 October 1916 aged 31 in United Kingdom. Died.
Cemetery: Hollybush Memorial Southampton P 104

Born 24th Sept 1885, Sevenoaks, Kent. Son of W. Cooper (O.M.).
Lower Shell—Middle V.

Permanent Address: Gravel Hill, Boxmoor, Herts
Address for Correspondence: A Battery, 85th Brigade RFA, Colchester
Occupation: Farmer
Received commission in Royal Field Artillery. 12th Bn. Royal Berkshire Regiment .

Service Record: WO 339/23383

Photo of William Dermot Cooper
Captain William Dermot Cooper
House: No 8, 1901 - 1904. Regiment: Ayrshire Yeomanry.
Died: 30 August 1917 aged 30 in Gaza. Killed in action in Palestine.
Cemetery: Gaza War Cemetery XXX1 A 11

Son of Alexander Hill Cooper, W.S., of 54, Manor Place, Edinburgh, and West Glenturret, Crief,b. 1887.
Modern III—Army II.

'Of a singularly cheerful and unselfish temperament, quiet and reliable, Derry Cooper endeared himself to all who knew him well at School: he was, indeed (as a soldier under his command expressed it), "a Proper Gentleman." The Army attracted him strongly, but duty led him to follow the Law as his profession. He found time, however, for military training, and was an enthusiastic officer in the Yeomanry. On the outbreak of war he immediately volunteered for service at the front, and after delays which sorely tried his ardour he was sent to Gallipoli; where he saw very hard service in the neighbourhood of C. Helles. On the evacuation of the peninsula he proceeded to Egypt, and subsequently took part in the Palestine Expedition, during which he lost his life, In the words of the Brigadier-General : "He was killed at the head of his men, gallantly leading them out under fire in bright moonlight"; and, he adds, "Capt . Cooper gave a very fine example to his men of leadership. He will be much missed in his Regiment, where he was a most popular and respected officer." That this is truly the case is evident from the numerous expressions of affection and admiration which form a striking feature of the many letters received since his death from brother-officers, and from men who served under him, e.g. : "We all deeply regret his loss, for Derry—as he was affectionately called—was a universal favourite."' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

'Mobilised in August 1914. Lieutenant in Ayrshire Yeomanry, and later attached to Royal Scots Fusiliers. Served in Gallipoli from September 1915 till evacuation, and afterwards in Egypt and Palestine.
Wounded in advance to Palestine and killed in action near Gaza on 30th August 1917. Promoted Captain. Mentioned in Dispatches.'National Library of Scotland

Killed in action 'G. S. W. Chest'

Service record: WO 374/15421
Medal card: WO 372/5/16490

Photo of George Frederick Francis Corbet
2nd Lieut George Frederick Francis Corbet
House: No 4, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 29 January 1916 aged 19 in United Kingdom. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Brookwood Cemetery London 2177036

Born: 20th May 1896, 27 Longridge Road, Brompton, Kensington
Father: The Hon Frederick Hugh Mackenzie Corbet (Barrister, Honorary Executive Officer for Ceylon at the Imperial Institute in 1896, Advocate General of Madras in 1914), College Bridge House, Egmore, Madras
Mother: Eila Louise Mary Corbet formerly Campbell
Brother: Reginald Vincent Corbet who was also at Malvern and was killed in action.
Sister: Constance Eila Corbet
Education: King's College School Wimbledon 1909-1912, Malvern College 1912-1914.
Army III—II. House Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Welch Regt. 1915.

Address: 4 College Grounds, Gt Malvern in 1912, The Newton Hotel, Newton Porthcawl, Glamorgan at time of probate.

'He joined his Battalion at the front in Flanders in April 1915, and was immediately engaged in the second battle of Ypres. On May 9th he was very severely wounded by shrapnell in the shoulder and throat. After a series of operations, which he bore with characteristic courage and cheerfulness, he seemed to be making a good recovery, and letters from him last autumn spoke hopefully of a return to active service. In December he was attached for light duty to the 21st Middlesex Regt., but the trouble in the throat necessitated further operations, and he died in London on Jan. 29th. His happy and affectionate nature won him many friends here. We share the grief of his parents, who have lost both their sons in the war.' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

He died at 2.45am on 25th January 1916 at Lady Ridley's Hospital, 10 Carlton House Terrace where he had been periodically since June 10th 1915 after previously being in No 7 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne, as a result of wounds received in action from a shell wound in the neck on May 7th 1915 at Ypres.

From 1st Welsh Regiment War diary:
7th May 1915, Ypres. Arrived GHQ line in support 4am & stood to as heavy firing heard. Shelled at intervals all day.
At 10pm 'A' Coy sent out to dig & hold trench on left of NF.
8th May . Strong German attack on our trenches. Left & centre of 83rd Bde broken by concentrated shell fire, leaving right of 84th Bde exposed. Germans forced a way in & worked up 84th Bde by enfilade fire assisted by heavy bombardment in front. Bn occupied GHQ line
9th May In GHQ lines. Very heavy shelling 3-5pm but very few casualties.

The dedication on the book 'Tell England' by Ernest Raymond reads as follows:
'To the Memory of Reginald Vincent Campbell Corbet who fell, while a boy, in the East and George Frederick Francis Corbet who passed, while a boy, in the West is affectionately dedicated what little is best in this book, nothing else in it being worthy of them. '

Ref: Invision Zone forum

Service record: WO 339/2697

War Diary 1 Welch Regiment: WO-95-2277-4

Wikipedia: Tell England

Photo of Sir Roland James Corbet (Bart)
Lieutenant Sir Roland James Corbet (Bart)
House: No 5, 1907 - 1910. Regiment: Coldstream Guards.
Died: 15 April 1915 aged 23 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Guards Cemetery Windy Corner Cuinchy 1 F 16

5th Bart. Born 19/08/1892. Son of the late Sir Walter Orlando Corbet, 4th Bart, Acton Reynold, Shrewsbury; and Lady Caroline Douglas Stewart (now Mrs. R. B. Astley).
Army III—I.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Coldstream Guards 1913 ; Lieutenant 1914. Mentioned in Despatches.

His elder brother died at Eton.

'He went out to the front early in the war, and was sent home wounded in October. On recovering he returned to Flanders and was killed in action on April 15. He was the fifth Baronet and head of one of the few families existing alive to trace in the male line direct descent from a family of the same name well known in Normandy, who came over with William the Conqueror. ' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

He was killed just south of Givenchy in the retreat from Mons.

He was due to be married at Moreton Corbet Church. There is a memorial tablet on the South Wall.
Livesofthefirstworldwar Biography on Fickr

Photo of Reginald Vincent Campbell Corbet
Lieutenant Reginald Vincent Campbell Corbet
House: No 4, 1908 - 1912. Regiment: Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Died: 28 April 1915 aged 21 in Turkey. Killed in action at Dardanelles.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 190-196

Son of Hon. F H M Corbet, Madras. Born:1894. Brother to George Frederick Francis Corbet.
Middle IV A—Army II. School Prefect. Head of House. Champion Athlete. House XI Football. Cadet Officer.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 1st Bn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1914 ; Lieutenant 1915.

'At Sandhurst he was appointed a Cadet Officer and obtained a Blue for Running. In Jan. I914 he was commissioned to the 2nd Bn. of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and in July was transferred to the 1st Bn. at Madras. In March of this year he was promoted Lieutenant and was made second officer in charge of the Machine Gun Section. He was killed in action at the Dardanelles on April 28. He was a boy of an affectionate nature and many sympathies, shown not only among school-fellows but also in the social work to which he devoted part of his holidays, and his power as a leader combined with a striking natural courtesy rendered him an exceptionally successful Head of his House. ' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

Medal card: WO 372/5/22337

Photo of Jack Baxter Coulson
2nd Lieut Jack Baxter Coulson
House: No 3, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: Lincolnshire Regt..
Died: 20 June 1916 aged 22 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Le Treport P2 RO G13

Son of Fred B and Florence Coulson, The Crofts, Bargate, Grimsby, b. 1894.
Lower IV—Upper IV B.
In business.
5th Bn. Lincolnshire Regiment.

Wounded due to German bombardment of village of Bienvillers on Sunday 4th June. He died of his wounds over 2 weeks later.

Memorial at Grimsby St. James Kalendar

A Lack of Offensive Spirit?: The 46th (North Midland) Division By Alan MacDonald

Photo of Edward Derek Courtney
Lieutenant Edward Derek Courtney
House: Day, 1910 - 1910. Regiment: Army Service Corps.
Died: 09 August 1918 aged 23 in France. Died on active service.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Etaples Military Cemetery XXV111 O 7

Born: August 31st 1895, 11 Belgrave Gardens, Hougham, Kent
Father: Colonel Edward Arthur Waldegrave Courtney C.M.G., C.B.E (late Lancashire Fusiliers and Royal Army Service Corps)
Mother: Hilda Maria Courtney formerly Chapman
Upper IV.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant A.S.C. 1915 ; Lieutenant. G.H.Q. Troops Supply Col. 55th Coy. Army Service Corps.

8th November 1916, admitted to Stationary hospital, Boulogne with furunculosis (boils).
Died from dysentery at 46th Stationary Hospital Etaples on 9th August 1918.

Service record: WO 339/44431
Medal card: WO 372/5/46205

Photo of Charles John Alexander Cowan
Captain Charles John Alexander Cowan
House: No 1, 1906 - 1912. Regiment: Royal Scots.
Died: 25 March 1918 aged 26 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Cerisy Gailly Mil Cemetery 11 C 3

Born 8th December 1892 at Moray House, Edinburgh. Son of Alexander Cowan (Papermaker) and Alice Buchanan Cowan (nee Comrie Thomson), of Valleyfield, Penicuik, Midlothian.
Upper IV B—Science Form. Junior Chapel Prefect. Head of House. XXII Cricket and Football. Cadet Officer.
Pembroke College, Cambridge.
3rd Bn. Royal Scots and then 12th Bn The Royal Scots.

'He had been in residence at Pembroke, Cambridge, for two years when war broke out. He at once joined the Royal Scots, and was gazetted Captain in 1915. He was wounded by a machine-gun bullet during the retreat, and died at a base hospital on March 25. Charlie Cowan did excellent work at School, where he was immensely popular alike with masters and boys, combining as he did keenness and thoroughness with a most cheery disposition. As an officer he was equally good—strict with his men, courageous as a lion, and an excellent leader. We offer our sincerest sympathy to his bereaved father.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Suffered in March 1915 from diarrhoea for 10 days, and then sent to hospital for bronchitis.
In January 1916, suffering from bronchial catarrh which was better by 6th July 1916, 3rd Bn The Royal Scots.
In April 1917, he was recovered from Bronchitis & Phthisis.
Died at No 51 Stationary Hospital in France of wounds received in action (12th Bn The Royal Scots).

There is a stained glass window above a cross dedicated to his memory at the Church of St James the Less in Penicuik.

Ref: Scotlandswar Church

Service record: WO 339/10312

Photo of Charles Selwyn Cowley
Lieutenant Charles Selwyn Cowley
House: No 2, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: Northamptonshire Regt..
Died: 09 May 1915 aged 22 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P 28-30

Born 6th October 1893. Son of John Selwyn Cowley,Surgeon & J.P., and Lilian Fuller Cowley, of Willow Bank, Upton-on-Severn, Worcs.
Upper IV B—Army II.
1st Bn. Northamptonshire Regiment.

Service record: WO 339/9335
Remembrance ceremony at Upton

Photo of Gerald Shakespear Crawford
Major Gerald Shakespear Crawford
House: No 1, 1895 - 1898. Regiment: South Wales Borderers.
Died: 10 August 1917 aged 38 in Belgium. Died of wounds.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery XV A 13

Born on 1st October 1879 in London, the 2nd son of Richard Irvine Crawford, a retired Colonel from the Indian Staff Corps, and his wife, Clara, 53 Margaret Street, W. b. 1879.
Upper IV—Modern I. School Prefect. XXII Football; XL Cricket.
Pembroke College, Oxford ; B.A. 1902 ;
Assistant Master, Cothill House School, 1905 ; Parkside, Epsom, 1906.
Great War, Private Public Schools Batt. 1914 ; Captain 6th Bn. South Wales Borderers.

'He enlisted at the outbreak of the war in the Public Schools Battalion, and in November, 1914, he received a temporary commission as Captain in the South Wales Borderers. He served uninterruptedly with his battalion till the middle of July, 1916, when he was promoted Major and attached to the North Staffordshire Regiment as second in command. He was wounded in the same month and invalided home. He returned to the front on July 21st. 1917, and was attached to another battalion of the South Wales Borderers. On August l0th, while engaged in reconnoitring work, he was twice wounded by shell and died the same day.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Address: 69 Linden Gardens, Bayswater formerly of 28 De Vere Gardens, Kensington
Joined in Sept 1914
Captain in the 5th South Wales Borderers (Pioneers) until 15th July 1916 when he was given majority and sent as 2nd in Command to the 8th North Stafforshire Regt.
On the 21st July 1916 he was wounded by a shell at Bazentin-le-Petit.
On 2nd July 1917, medical board stated he was now fit for general service after suffering from a G.S.W. Scapular region, psoriasis (due to sepsis) and colitis.
On the 3rd August 1917, during the battle of Passchendaele, the War diary stated the conditions were terrible with heavy rain and mud thigh deep and there many casualties.
On the 4th August 1917, it was stated that their medium artillery was falling behind their front line. There were 4 killed in action, and 8 wounded.
There were further casualties every day when on the 10th August, with C.T. south of Westhoek, and D Coy holding Gordon House to Menin Road, Major Crawford was wounded in action along with 22 men.
Major Crawford died from his wounds the following day.

Widow: Clara Anne Crawford

Service record: WO 339/13455

6 Battalion South Wales Borderers (Pioneers): WO 95/2238/2
Lijssenthoek Pembroke Collge

Photo of Stanley Searle Crisp
Major Stanley Searle Crisp
House: Sch, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 08 December 1917 aged 30 in Italy. Died of wounds in Italy.
Cemetery: Giavera British Arcade Italy P 1 R G G 5

Born 17th January 1887, 3rd son of Fred Crisp JP DL and Elizabeth Crisp, White House, New Southgate.
Planter in Malay States.
63rd Anti-Aircraft Sect. Royal Field Artillery.

'Stanley Crisp was a boy of fair ability, and showed distinct promise at cricket. He was popular in his House. On leaving School he went to the Malay States, as a planter. He did excellent work in the war, and was a temporary Major in the R.F.A. when he died of wounds.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

On the 9th December 1917, his wife, Mrs Muriel May Crisp, received a telegram at the Mascot Hotel on Baker Street from the War Office regretting that her husband was dangerously ill with shell wounds to the chest and the following day on the 10th December 1917 she received a telegram deeply regretting to inform her that he had died from his wounds at No 39 Casualty Clearing Station, Italy

Service record: WO 339/57134
Grevestone memorial at Friern Barnet Churchyard

STANLEY SEARLE CRISP (H1/18)
My dearly loved husband Fred Crisp JP DL who departed this life November 9th 1905 in his 57th year, “Peace perfect peace”,
also Stanley Searle, 3rd son of the above, Major Royal Field Artillery, killed in action December 6th 1917 aged 31 years, buried in British Military Cemetery Istrana Italy, “Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori”,
also Elizabeth, wife of the above Fred Crisp, passed on March 23rd 1939 in her 90th year, “God moves in a mysterious way.”

Photo of Sir Herbert Archer Croft (Bart)
Captain Sir Herbert Archer Croft (Bart)
House: No 5, 1885 - 1886. Regiment: Herefordshire Regt..
Died: 11 August 1915 aged 47 in Turkey. Died of wounds at Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 198

Born September 5, 1868, (10th Bart). Son of Sir Herbert George Denman Croft, 9th Bt., Lugwardine Court, Hereford.
Modern II.
1st Bn. Herefordshire Regiment.
Wife: Lady Katharine Agnes Croft (formerly Parr, married 3 Feb 1903), of Croft Castle, Kingsland, Herefordshire
Children: Elinor Croft, born 14 Jan 1904, and James Hebert Croft, born 24 May 1907.
He was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for Herefordshire.

'When the war broke out he joined the 1st Herefordshire Regiment as a private. He offered to raise 150 men on joining, and performed the task within a week. He was gazetted Captain three months after enlisting, and died of wounds received in Gallipoli in the middle of August. ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record:WO 374/16666 Geni Peerage.com

Photo of Thomas Horsfall Crofton
Captain Thomas Horsfall Crofton MC
House: No 1, 1904 - 1908. Regiment: Connaught Rangers.
Died: 21 March 1918 aged 29 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 77

Son of Sir Malby Crofton, 3rd Bart., and Lady Crofton, of Longford House, Ballisodare, Co. Sligo.
Middle IV—Modern I. School Prefect. XL Football; House XI Cricket.
Trinity College, Dublin ; B.A., B.E..
In British Columbia.
Great War, Private Canadian Highlanders 1914 ; Captain 3rd Bn. attd. 6th Bn. Connaught Rangers.

'A kindly, unassuming nature, and a quick perception of duty were marked characteristics in him, and the following account from The Times proves that he served his country with that keen loyalty he had shown for his School and House: "Captain Thomas Horsfall Crofton, M.C., Connaught Rangers, killed on March 21st, graduated as an engineer at Trinity College, Dublin. He afterwards went out to British Columbia, and directly war was declared he enlisted there as a Private in a Canadian Highlander battalion, and came to England with them; but early in 1915 he obtained a commission in the Connaught Rangers, his local regiment in Ireland. He earned a "parchment" and a Military Cross by his recent conduct at the front." ' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).
Detailed Biography at Connaught Ranger Association website

Photo of Reginald Carlton Cross
Lieutenant Reginald Carlton Cross
House: No 5, 1906 - 1910. Regiment: Dorset Yeomanry.
Died: 07 June 1918 aged 27 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Couin New British Cemetery G 15

Born November 11th 1891, Crooke Hall, Whittle-le-Woods, Chorley, Lancashire
Father: Reginald Carlton Cross (Cotton Manufacturer), Wyke Hall, Gillingham
Mother Emily Cross formerly Briscoe
Army III—II. School Prefect. XI Football 1909,10 ; House XI Cricket.
Clare College, Cambridge.
Farmer in British Columbia.
Great War, Private Strathcona's Horse 1914, Lieutenant Dorset Yeomanry (Queen's Own) attd. South Lancashire Regiment.

Address: Wyke Hall, Gillingham, Dorset.

'Reginald Cross joined No. 5 from Stone House School, Broadstairs, in 1906 in the old House, and very soon made his mark at football, and as a strenuous doer in School life. He was a good naturalist, and as a junior a great owner of livestock. He was in the 1908 House Team which won the Cup in an historic Final, and justified his selection. He was at one time intended for the Army, but eventually went to Clare, and later to British Columbia. The Times says ;— "On the declaration of war he returned from British Columbia and enlisted in Lord Strathcona's Horse, and went to France with the regiment in May, 1915. He obtained a commission in the Dorset Yeomanry in November, 1915, and became a scouting officer to the brigade. He was attached to the South Lancashire Regiment in October, 1917, and left for the front immediately. A brother officer writes :—' I know you will be proud to hear that he died while carrying back a wounded man from No Man's Land ; he was shot through the head and died immediately. He had already carried in one wounded man. I feel no one could wish to die doing a better duty. We all both loved and admired him, and he will be greatly missed in the battalion. He was always so full of life and so cheery under all discomforts. His men loved him.' " (Malvernian, Jul 1918).

Memorial wooden Cross at St. Mary the Virgin Church, Gillingham, Dorset

Service record: WO 374/16860

Photo of Thomas Mervyn Crowe
Sub Lieutenant Thomas Mervyn Crowe
House: No 9, 1899 - 1905. Regiment: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Died: 07 June 1915 aged 29 in Turkey. Killed in action at the Dardanelles.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 8-15

Son of Mrs. E. M. Crowe, Silverhill, Kenilworth, Cape Town. b. 1886.
Ill—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Jesus College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1909 ; stroked Leander Crew at Terdonck International Regatta 1911 ;
He was part of the Jesus College Cambridge rowing crew who beat the Belgiums in 1911 in Belgium.
Stock Exchange.
Anson Bn. R.N. Div. Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

The Extinguished Flame: Olympians Killed in The Great War By Nigel McCrery

Photo of Leslie Oakes Crowther
Captain Leslie Oakes Crowther
House: No 3, 1905 - 1908. Regiment: 10 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 06 December 1916 aged 25 in France. Killed in action near Avesnesle Comte.
Cemetery: Avesnes Le Comte 11 B 22

Son of Herbert Oakes Crowther and Nellie Oakes Crowther, of Broadclyst, Beckenham, Kent, b. 1891.
Lower Shell—Upper Shell.
In business.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 9th Bn Royal West Kent Regt. 1914 ; 1915, Captain. 12th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps.

'He left school before his full course had run, but there remained behind him a pleasing memory of cheerful and unselfish companionship. Those who have been in touch with him in latter years have been struck with the earnestness he showed in business and the delight he took in his life abroad.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Obituary from The Times dated 12th Dec 1916:
"CAPTAIN LESLIE OAKES CROWTHER. Flight Commander, R.F.C., killed on December 6, was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Crowther, of Broadclyst, Beckenham, Kent. Born in 1891, he was educated at St. Andrew's School, Eastbourne, and Malvern College, afterwards spending two years in New York and Dresden for educational purposes. Captain Crowther joined the Royal West Kent Regiment in September, 1914, and in December, 1915, transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. For many months he had been at the front, where he was engaged in many air flights and bomb-dropping expeditions. His major writes:- "The squadron has lost a most capable and popular officer, and I cannot say how sorry I am and my officers to have lost such a good fellow"

He was flying a BE 2d 5832 of No 12 Sqn RFC when he was killed in an accident on 6 December 1916.
InvisionZone

Photo of Evelyn Claude Culling
Captain Evelyn Claude Culling
House: No 4, 1899 - 1900. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 24 April 1915 aged 30 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 10-18. 26 -28

Son of Lieut.-Col. J. C. Culling, West Lydford, Taunton, b. 1885.
Army III.
Royal Munster Fusiliers 1906; Lieutenant 1908; resigned 1909;
afterwards an officer in the Canadian Militia, and a Lumberman.
Great War, Captain Canadian Infantry 1914 (overseas).

2nd Bn. Canadian Infantry

Photo of Charles Malcolm Cumming
Chief Commissioner Charles Malcolm Cumming
House: No 5, 1881 - 1884. Regiment: Church Army Huts.
Died: 08 May 1918 aged 51 in -. Died.
Cemetery: -

Son of C. E. D. Cumming, Upper Tooting. b. 1867.
III—Middle IV.
Planter in Ceylon and Federated Malay States 1888. Died May 1918

'He spent the greater part of his life as a planter in Ceylon and the Federated Malay States, and was at one time chairman of the Planter's Association. He was for 16 years, since its inception, manager of the Linggi Plantations (Limited), and since 1911, when he retired from the East, a, director of that and other rubber companies. In 1914 he went to France with No. 4 Motor Ambulance Corps, gaining the 1914 Star, and 1916 he became Chief Commissioner for Church Army Huts at the front, a position from which he retired last year owing to ill-health: he, unfortunately, never recovered his health, and he died in England in May of this year.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

He went to France in October 1914, taking his own car. He was a civilian, a member of the Church Army, and he was a chauffeur for the British Red Cross, working for the Motor Ambulance Department. He was attached to a Clearing Hospital at the Front and died on 8th May 1918 from an illness contracted in France.
Biography at West Sussex

Photo of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson
Lieutenant Edward Hedley Cuthbertson
House: No 5, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt. Att Lan Regt.
Died: 24 July 1917 aged 29 in Iraq. Died on active service in Mesopotamia.
Cemetery: Amara War Cemetery X111 L 6

Born 15th December 1889 at 59 Fairholt Road, Stoke Newington. Son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson and Alice Cuthbertson formerly Monro, Bushey House, Bushey, Herts.
Middle IV B—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket 1906,07 ; XI Football 1905,06.
Clare College, Cambridge ; played Association Football v. Oxford.
He was a noted cricketer playing for the Malvern 1st X1, Cambridge University, and Marylebone Cricket Club
In business, Stockbroker.
Address in 1914: 51 Egerton Crescent, Kensington.

'Hedley Cuthbertson's school-life at Malvern of 4.5 years was marked by two chief characteristics, his success as an athlete, and his marked independence of character. At football and cricket generally he reached a good Eleven standard, while his wicket keeping was something better. In fact wicket keeping was exactly suited to his temperament. It called out all his skill, and entailed no bustle ; for he was one of those who could not be bustled. But his strong will and his kindly disposition were the chief causes of the affection that his school friends entertained for him at School and afterwards, and which endears his memory to them now.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

9th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Embarked Bombay on 22nd June 1917 and disembarked Basrah 28th June 1917.
30th June 1917, arrived at Martina
Following from Medical case sheet:
20th July 1917 . Admitted to hospital at Amara. Had been proceeding up river and been 14 days in Mesopotamia.
21st July 1917, Temperature 106 degrees and patient collapsed. Pulse imperceptible
22nd July 1917. Restless night but seemed better, still rather cyanosed
23rd July 1917. Restless, pulse not so good, in evening temperature started to rise. Died at 6.30pm
25th July 1917, died from effects of heat.

Widow: Mary Constance Cuthbertson (formerly Follett), of 72, Onslow Gardens, South Kensington, London.
Livesofthefirstworldwar

Final Wicket: Test and First Class Cricketers Killed in the Great War By Nigel McCrery

Service record: WO 339/23182

Photo of Hugh Cuthbertson
2nd Lieut Hugh Cuthbertson
House: No 5, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 14 April 1918 aged 28 in France. Killed in France.
Cemetery: Fouquieres 11 E 3

Son of Edward Hedley Cuthbertson and Alice Cuthbertson, of 13 Devonshire Place, London and 67 Portland Place and Bushey House, Bushey, Herts, b. 1890.
Modern III—I. Chance Prize ; Grey French. School Prefect. House XI Cricket and Football.
Trinity College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1912.
Occupation: Articled Clerk to Chartered Accountant
Great War, Private A.S.C. 1914; Bombardier R.G.A. ;
Joined 8th August 1914. In France from 5th October 1914 to 7th December 1916 in the Army Service Corps. At home from 8th Dec 1916 to 5th Jan 1918.
Discharged to a Commission as a Lieutenant in the"B" Bty. 275th Bde. Royal Field Artillery on 5th Jan 1918.

'Hugh Cuthbertson left a splendid reputation at School as a determined trier and a loyal friend. He had not the natural gift for games of his elder brother Hedley, but won the respect of the House by splendid public spirit. He had left Cambridge when the war broke out, and elected to join the A.S.C. rather than wait for a commission. He served in many ranks in France, and had the Mons Star and Ribbon. Eventually he transferred to the R.G.A., becoming a Bombardier, and later to a Cadet battalion, where he was commissioned in 1918. He had just returned to France, and been in action for a few hours, when he was killed by a shell.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Service record: WO 339/104722

Photo of Francis Edward Lloyd Daniell
Lieutenant Colonel Francis Edward Lloyd Daniell
House: Sch, 1890 - 1893. Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders.
Died: 04 March 1916 aged 42 in France. Died of wounds in Flanders.
Cemetery: Cite Bonjean Armentieres 1X F 30

Born 19 Dec. 1874. Son of Maj. Gen. F. F. Daniell (late Gordon Highlanders) and Mrs. Daniell,Hilifield, Detting, Maidstone.
Army Side. School Prefect. XXII Football; House XI Cricket. R.M.C. Sandhurst; Seaforth Highlanders 1895; Major 1913; Staff College, Quetta, 1908; General Staff, Mhow, 1911—12; Occupa tion of Crete 1897; Sudan 1898, Despatches, Queen’s and Khedive’s Medals with Clasp; South African War 1900-01, Special Service, Queen’s Medal with 4 Clasps; N.W. Frontier of India 1908, Medal with Clasp; King George’s Durbar Medal 191
Great War, Brigade- Major 1914; G.S.O.I., Lieut.-Colonel 191 D.S.O., Despatches (. Seaforth Highlanders attd. to 21st Division General Staff. D S O.

Husband of the late Maud Esmie Daniell.

He obtained his commission in Sept. 1895, and was promoted Captain, March, 1901
Served in the occupation of Crete in 1897, took part in the Sudan Expedition, was present at the Battle of Atbara, and in the South African War, 1899-1901.
In 1908 he saw service on the North-West Frontier of India, taking part in the operations in the Zakka Khel and the Mohmand countries.
He was Adjutant of the 1st Battn. Seaforth Highlanders, 1902 to 1906. He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, Dec. 1913.
In WW1, he was twice mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.
He served as a G.S.O, and fell in action about 4th March, 1916.

'In the present war he served on the General Staff both in France and at home, was twice mentioned in despatches and awarded the D.S.O. He died of wounds in Flanders on or about March 4th, 1916. Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel and Staff Officer, 1st Grade. A contemporary writes : "Gifted with great charm of manner, a beautiful voice and real ability, he quickly made his mark at School. He was a soldier's son, and from the first concentrated all his efforts on fitting himself for his future profession, and though good at games he never allowed them to interfere with his work. His record in the Army speaks for itself, and by his death Malvern has lost one of her most promising soldiers."' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

The divisional diary for 4th March 1916 states: 'At 5pm the enemy shelled Armetieres,Houplines and Nieppe, 15cm, 10.5cm howitzers and field guns were firing, and during the bombardment and Lt-Colonel Daniell DSO, was killed.'

Biography: The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II
21st Division Diary

Photo of Cyril Francis Davenport
2nd Lieut Cyril Francis Davenport
House: No 4, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Hampshire Regt..
Died: 02 August 1916 aged 19 in France. Accidentally killed at Bethune.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Bethune Town Cemetery 111 K 37

Son of Mrs. Edward Davenport, of Amberley, Stroud, Glos., and the late Rev. Edward Davenport, Stoke Talmage, Tetsworth, Oxon. b. 1897.
Lower IV—Middle IV A.
Engineer.
Great War, Inns of Court O.T.C. 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant "A" Coy. 14th Bn. Hampshire Regiment.

'He was of a happy, generous, and affectionate nature, and an excellent companion, observant of and keenly interested in out-door things. Delicacy of health in earlier life had caused slow development, but he found himself in the practical work of engineering and of military service. He obtained a commission in a Battalion of the Hampshire Regt., in which he did exceptionally good work as Bombing Officer. His men were devoted to him and he was described by his Colonel as "one of our best officers, always cheery and always at work." He died of wounds received on Aug. 2nd through the premature explosion of a hand grenade, while he was assisting the Instructor of the Brigade Bombing School. ' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

He was wounded in an accident at the Brigade Bomb school and died shortly after being admitted to hospital. Several other officers from the 11th, 12th & 13th Royal Sussex Regt were also wounded at the bomb school.
The following day on the 3rd August at Les Choqueax, several officers attended his funeral along with men from his platoon.

Service record: WO 339/40073
Medal card: WO 372/5/171212
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2583/6

Photo of Henry William Warren Davis
Lieutenant Henry William Warren Davis
House: No 1, 1906 - 1910. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 18 April 1915 aged 25 in Belgium. Killed in action at Hill 60.
Cemetery: Bedford House Cemetery Brit No 3 Zonnebeke Mem 1

Born on 27 December 1891, son of Henry Warren Davis and Christobel Warren Davis, of The Warren, Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire.
Army III—II. School Prefect. House XI Football.
Mentioned in Despatches.
Gazetted Second Lieutenant into the Welsh Regiment on 14 February 1912, and was a Lieutenant with the 1st Battalion, Welsh Regiment at the outbreak of war, which moved to France in January 1915.
In the Second Battle of Ypres, on 18 April 1915, he was sent out in charge of a party of bombers from B Company, to destroy a Trench Mortar, and was killed while stooping down to aid a wounded man during the assault at Hill 60.
The History of the Welsh Regiment records; ‘Lieutenant Davis was a great loss—a fine sportsman and an excellent bomber and shot, he was developing into an invaluable sniping expert.’
Biography

NB: The Malvern College memorial entry mistakenly records the date as 18 Apr 1916 and not 18 Apr 1915.

Photo of Reginald Samuel Daw
Captain Reginald Samuel Daw
House: Sch, 1895 - 1898. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 25 August 1916 aged 35 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Dernancourt Communal 1 A 16

Son of Samuel John and Helen Grace Daw, 35 Lincoln's Inn Fields, b. 1881.
Shell—Lower VI. XXII Football.
LL.B. (First Class Honours) Lond. 1903 ;
Solicitor 1904 ; Inns of Court O.T.C. (retired).
Great War, re-joined 1914, 2nd Lieutenant 15th Batt. K.R.R.C. 1915. "B" Coy. 9th Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps.

Husband of Laura Daw, of Vine Cottage, West Hoathly, Sussex.

'Reginald Daw was at School a quiet steady boy, of more than average ability. He was a very useful football player and helped to win the Football Cup for his House. His legal attainments were very considerable, and it says much for his patriotism that he lost no time in re-joining the Inns of Court O T.C. when war broke out. His subsequent record speaks for itself. He went to the front in August 1915, and was recently mentioned in despatches. He was killed on August 25th, being struck in the back with a piece of shell; he became unconscious at once and was removed to a dressing station, where he died the next morning.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

He was killed in action at Delville Wood.

Service record: WO 339/70032
Medal Card: WO 372/5/214175
Unit war diary: WO 95/1900/2 List of Officers Delville wood attack Map showing attack

Photo of Edmund Deacon
Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Deacon
House: No 3, 1888 - 1890. Regiment: Essex Yeomanry.
Died: 13 May 1915 aged 43 in Belgium. Killed in action at Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate PANEL 15

Son of E. Deacon, Buxted Park, Uckfield. B. 1872.
Army Class. School Prefect. XXII Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst 1891; 1st King’s Dragoon Guards 1892; retired 1899; M.P.H. East Essex, Newmarket and Thurlow; D.L. co. Essex 1912; Lieut.-Colonel Essex Yeomanry 1911.
Great War, mobilised 1914, Commanded Essex Yeoman formerly 1st (King's) Dragoon Guard

Husband of Sybil Deacon, of Sloe House, Halstead, Essex.
Master of the Essex Foxhounds

'After leaving Malvern, he went to Sandhurst and was gazetted to the 1st King's Dragoon Guards in 1891. He retired in 1899, and became successively Master of the East Essex and the Newmarket and Thurlow Hunts. When the Essex Yeomanry was formed, in 1901, he joined with the rank of Major, having raised a squadron in his own Hunt. In 1911 he was given command of the regiment. The Essex was one of the first Yeomanry Regiments to be chosen for active service, and left England for France in November 1914. He was killed, while still in command of the Yeomanry, at the second battle of Ypres, May 13th, 1915. ' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

He was killed during the attack at 2.15pm to reoccupy front line trenches east of Potijze, near Ypres.
Biography - Charterhouse

Menin Gate North: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman

Photo of James Owen Cuninghame Dennis
Lieutenant James Owen Cuninghame Dennis
House: No 2, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Irish Horse & R. F. C..
Died: 22 October 1914 aged 26 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate PANEL 5/9

Son of Mrs. Dennis, c/o Cox & Co., Charing Cross, S.W. b. 1888.
Army III—I. School Prefect. Head of House. Shooting VIII 1906,07 ; House XI Football.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A. 1909 ; Lieutenant 1912.

'Owen Dennis was killed by a shell when he was directing his battery’s fire from the infantry trenches. His Major states that he considered him to be the smartest officer. Throughout the time that he was at the front he displayed unflinching bravery. This was quite in accordance with what we noted in him at school. He had a definite aim before him, and he showed steady resolution in attaining it. He served his school and his country well.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914).

Menin Gate North: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman

Photo of James Robert Dennistoun
Captain James Robert Dennistoun
House: No 4, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: 2 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 09 August 1916 aged 33 in Germany. Died of wounds in Germany.
Cemetery: Niederzwehren Cemetery Hessen Germany IV H 2

Son of George James and Emily Dennistoun, of Peel Forest, Timaru, New Zealand.
Modern IV—Lower Modern I. House Prefect.
23rd Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and North Irish Horse.

'He was a boy of sturdy character, frank and lively in disposition, and popular in his House and in the School. On returning to his home in New Zealand he became a sheep-farmer. He took the keenest pleasure in mountaineering, and made the ascent of many of the snow-capped Southern Alps of New Zealand, amongst them that of several virgin peaks. He climbed, alone, Mitre Peak, in Milford Sound, which had been considered inaccessible. He did a considerable amount of exploration work, and was a member of the Alpine Club. In 1910-11 he went to the Antarctic in the Terra Nova, as a member of Captain Scott's expedition in charge of mules, and was awarded the King's Antarctic Medal and that of the Royal Geographical Society. On the outbreak of the war he came to England and was given a commission in the Irish Horse. He went to the front in Nov. 1915 and served for some months as Intelligence Officer to a Division, afterwards joining the Royal Flying Corps.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

On 9 August 1916, he was acting as Observer in a FE2b 6348 on a bombing mission East of Arras and was in combat with three Fokker enemy aircraft and was wounded 3 times in the stomach. His biplane caught fire, and was compelled to descend in the enemy’s lines, and died from his wounds at Ohrdruf in Thuringia.
Auckland museum Wikipedia (in German) Flight Magazine InvisionZone

Photo of Robert William Millington Dewhurst
Lieutenant Robert William Millington Dewhurst
House: No 2, 1909 - 1914. Regiment: Wiltshire Regt..
Died: 26 April 1916 aged 21 in Iraq. Died of wounds in Mesopotamia.
Cemetery: Amara War Cemetery V1 D 12

Born July 14th 1895. Son of Robert Paget Dewhurst and Florence Frances Maud Dewhurst, of 106, Abingdon Rd., Oxford, and Gonda, Oudh, India, and Littlecote, Amersham Hill, High Wycombe.
Upper V—Mathematical VI. Senior Scholar. Leaving Scholarship. School Prefect. Shooting VIII. House XI Football.
Scholar, Corpus Christi College, Oxford.
He gained a mathematical scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, in November, 1913, and on leaving Malvern in July, 1914, he was awarded a leaving scholarship and the Dowdeswell Prize for mathematics.

'At School he distinguished himself in various directions. His intellectual powers were considerable, and it was confidently anticipated that he would have a creditable career at Oxford, where he had gained a Mathematical Scholarship shortly before the war broke out. His keenness and determination and high principle won for him general respect, and those who were privileged to know him intimately realised the value of true friendship. He received his commission in August 1914, and was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment in September of that year. He died of wounds on April 26th, aged 20.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Telegram sent on 25 Apr 1916 stating that he had been severely wounded in the head on the 21/22 April in the Tigris line.

He was mentioned in a despatch from Lieutenant General Sir Percy Lake dated 24th August 1916, for 'gallant and distinguished service in the Field'.
Corpus Christi Oxford

Service record: WO 339/11799
Medal card: WO 372/6/15872
Unit Diary: WO 95/5161/3

Photo of Digby Caleb Cecil Dickinson
2nd Lieut Digby Caleb Cecil Dickinson
House: No 5, 1912 - 1916. Regiment: South Wales Borderers.
Died: 18 August 1918 aged 21 in France. Killed in action at Outersteen.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Borre British Cemetery 11 G 38

Son of Francis and Lucy Dickinson, of Aberyskir Court, Breconshire, b. 1897.
Upper IV—Army II. School Prefect. XXII Cricket ; House XI Football; Ledbury Cap 1914-16 (winner).
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 19I7, 2nd Bn. South Wales Borderers.

'"Dick" was a real boy, one of a most happy trio, full of spirits that nothing could damp, quick to see an error and take advice, of boundless energy and pluck that made him a Ledbury winner. As a runner he served his House really well, for he took the utmost care in training others, and was far more interested in their performances than even in his own. Both at Sandhurst and during his brief life in the Army he wrote the letters of a keen soldier, and there was every promise of a most successful future for him. His elder brother was killed a month later, and we offer our very deepest sympathy to the parents in their great sorrow.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918)

His colonel wrote :—"He was in command of his company in the attack on August 18th, and it was characteristic of him that he should have been right at the head of his men. His death is a great loss to us, He had a quite exceptional hold over the men under him, and his absolute fearlessness and enthusiasm had a great effect on all who came in contact with him. His company was magnificent in the attack, and it was largely owing to the fine spirit and determination they had got from him that they carried through the attack with such success."
Brecon & Radnor Express Sept 19th 1918

Photo of Kenneth Curling Doddrell
2nd Lieut Kenneth Curling Doddrell
House: No 9, 1913 - 1915. Regiment: Wiltshire Regt..
Died: 07 October 1918 aged 20 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Ramleh War Cemetery U 22

Son of Rev. Curling Finzel and Mary Doddrell, English Bicknor, Glos. b. 1898. Bother: Hugh Doddrell.
Lower IV—Army III.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Wiltshire Regt. 1917.

•1898, Ilfracombe, Devon, England
•1901, Lion Hill, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England

'After passing through Sandhurst, Kenneth Doddrell was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment. He had only been a short time in France when he was killed in action on October 7th. He was a quiet, unassuming boy, and popular in his House. In some respects he was old for his years, but always thoroughly interested in and keen on everything connected with School life. At Sandhurst he won distinction as a fine long-distance runner. He had all the qualities which make a good soldier and popular officer.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

2nd Bn. Attd. 1st/4th Bn. Wiltshire Regiment
13 Jan 1918 Joined 1/4th Wilts Regt.
28 Feb 1918 Admitted with Diptheria to El Arish.
7 July 1918 Rejoined Unit.
19 Sep 1918 Killed in action

Service record: WO 339/65361
Medal card: WO 372/6/49449

Photo of Roger Gillespie Drysdale
2nd Lieut Roger Gillespie Drysdale
House: No 1, 1902 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt..
Died: 15 April 1915 aged 27 in United Kingdom. Died in England.
Cemetery: Lymington 2466

Born March 1st 1888 in Cannes, France. Son of Mrs. Drysdale, The Driffold, Broadway, Worcs.
Middle Shell—Remove. House Prefect. House XI Football; Ledbury Cap 1905,06.
Peterhouse, Cambridge ; B.A. (Third Class Historical Tripos) 1910. B.A. in History in 1911.
Fruit Grower.
Great War, Private 8th Worcestershire Regt. 1914 ; Gazetted (2nd Lieutenant) on 1st January 1915 into the 4th Battalion, the Warwickshire Regiment.

Letter from the Commanding Officer, 4th Btn Royal Warwickshire Reg to The Secretary, War Office, Golden Hill, Isle of Wight, 16th April 1915.
Sir,
I regret to have to report the death of 2nd Lieutenant R. G. Drysdale, of the Battalion under my command.
I have not yet heard the opinion of the Coroner’s inquest, but I fear there is no doubt whatever but that this Officer took his own life.
2nd Lieut Drysdale completed a Junior Officers’ Course at Portsmouth last Saturday and had leave until Wednesday night. About 7 o’clock in the evening I received a telegram from him to say that he had missed his boat and would cross from Lymington to Yarmouth by the first boat in the morning.
He was seen walking up and down the platform for some minutes before the train came in, with a revolver under his arm. Directly the train came into Lymington Town Station he got into the carriage alone and shot himself in the head. He died a few minutes afterwards.
This officer has been suffering from fits of depression for some time and had on more that one occasion asked me to allow him to resign his Commission, giving as the reason that he did not feel competent to carry out the duties of an Officer. This idea was entirely imaginary, as he was able to and did do his work quite well. He had a bad attack of influenza before he joined, and a Doctor informed me that he thought that the depression and Insomnia he was suffering from was probably due to this cause. Seeing the state of mind he was in, I went out of the way to cheer him up and asked others to do so too, which I know they did.

Badsey parish magazine of May 1915:
“On all sides there have been expressions of sympathy with Mrs Drysdale in the loss of her son, Lieut Drysdale, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Had his devotion to duty been less his life would, in all human probability, have been longer. Undertaking new duties and responsibilities at a time when he was not even convalescent from influenza, and when he was altogether unequal to work of any description, he became depressed and despondent about ever being able to cope with them. As his academic record and the testimony of his Colonel showed, his natural gifts were such as go to make a capable and efficient officer. It was, in fact, in consequence of his qualifications and in the hope that his health might improve that he was urged by his Colonel to retain his commission when he asked to be relieved of it. Unhappily, he never recovered from the effects of the initial strain and the burden eventually proved more than he could bear.”
Biography at Badsey Society

Service record: WO 339/27837

Photo of Robert Roland Waddell Dudley
Lieutenant Robert Roland Waddell Dudley
House: No 5, 1901 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 15 April 1915 aged 28 in Belgium. Killed in action in Flanders.
Cemetery: Tyne Cot Cemetery L1V F 16

Son of Rev. W. D. W-Dudley, St. Albans, b. 1887.
Lower V—VI. School Prefect. XXII Football; House XI Cricket; Rackets Pair ; Fives Pair.
Exhibitioner, Worcester College, Oxford; Third Class Class.
Mods, 1909 ; B.A. (Fourth Class History) 1911 ; played Lawn Tennis v. Cambridge 1910;
Royal Fusiliers 1911 ; Lieutenant 1912. 3rd Bn. Royal Fusiliers. Mentioned in Despatches

He went to Worcester College, Oxford in 1906 and was a tennis half-blue.
He was gazetted to the 3rd battalion Royal Fusiliers in December 1911 and joined the regiment in India in January 1912.
At the outbreak of the war he was serving on Lord Willingdon's Staff at Bombay as A.D.C. but obtained permission to re-join his regiment when it was ordered to France.
He was wounded in February 1915 when a bullet was embedded in his back. Refusing an operation to remove it, or to return to England to convalesce, he returned to the front in March.
Lieutenant Roland Waddell-Dudley was killed in action in Belgium on 15 April 1915.

Memorial at Stephen's church, St Albans:
IN MEMORY OF/ ROBERT ROLAND/ WADDELL-DUDLEY/ LIEUT 3rd BATT ROYAL FUSILIERS/ KILLED IN ACTION AT ZONNEBEKE/ FLANDERS APRIL 15th 1915/ AGED 28/ A GOOD SOLDIER OF JESUS CHRIST
Biography at Worcester College, Oxford
Memorial IWM

Service record: WO 339/8067

Photo of William Stanley Eames
Lieutenant William Stanley Eames
House: No 4, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 16 February 1916 aged 28 in Belgium. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery 11 A 34

Son of Harry William and Eleanor Mary Eames, of The Mount, Cosby, Leicester b. 1888.
Middle Shell—VI. Lea Shakespeare; English Verse. School Prefect.
Exeter College, Oxford ; Second Class Class. Mods. 1909 ; B.A. (Second Class Lit. Hum.) 1911 ; Eastern Cadetship 1911.
Magistrate and Assistant District Judge for Malacca, and later for Singapore.
7th Bn. Royal Fusiliers

'Stanley Eames was a boy of gentle character, modest, studious, and, though he would never have claimed to be an exact scholar, a lover of the best in literature. He himself produced a few years ago a small volume of verse which gave promise in its thought and poetic feeling of greater performance in the future. He went up as a Scholar to Exeter College, Oxford, in 1907, and took a Second Class in Classical Moderations and in Greats. Appointed to an Eastern Cadetship in 1911 he became Collector, Magistrate, and Assistant Deputy Judge for Malacca and later for Singapore. He served in the war as Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, being at the time of his death attached to the I2th Battalion. He was mortally wounded on Feb. 15th, when he had crawled to the rescue of two men who had been sniped, and spent his remaining strength in shouting to prevent others from attempting to bring him in. "We have lost," says a letter from his regiment, " a brave, conscientious, and high minded officer." ' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

From 'The Evening Dispatch' 1 March 1916:
'Lieutenant Eames gained an open classical scholarship to Exeter College, Oxford, and took honours in Classics.
For three years he was in the Civil Service in the Malay States.
He went out to the rescue of wounded men, and was himself shot by a German sniper. The men belonging to his company offered to dash out to bring hin back to the trench but he ordered them to keep where they were because of the risk. He told them he would wait until it was dark. The wounded officer was subsequently got back to safety, but succumbed to his wounds'.

He is commemorated on the Malacca War Memorial Christ Church, Malaysia and the Singapore Cenotaph.
Lives of the First World War

Photo of Llewellyn Albert Edwards
Captain Llewellyn Albert Edwards
House: Day, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt..
Died: 23 March 1918 aged 24 in France. Killed in action near Germaine.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Savy British Cemetery 1 O 1

Son of the Rev. J. J. and Mrs. Edwards, of Berrow Vicarage, Tewkesbury, Glos and Peachfield Cottage, Malvern. Born at Casablanca. Morocco, 1894. .
Upper V—VI. Minor Scholar. Reading Prize. School Prefect. Head of House. House XI Football.
Scholar, Christ's College, Cambridge.
7th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

'Llewellyn Edwards will be long remembered by his many friends here and at Cambridge for the charming modesty of his manner, the vigour of his intellect, and the robustness of his character.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

He was killed in action on March 22nd at 11pm.
A fellow officer wrote – ‘I am the only officer left in his Company and was with him where he was mortally wounded. All day previously he had shown great cheerfulness and disregard of danger, and was forever walking up and down urging and cheering on the men. Even when he was wounded his last words to me were, ‘Look after the Company, and keep down off the top of the trench.’ These words were just characteristic of him – a way of thinking of others before himself. A very good officer, liked immensely by his fellow officers, and loved by all his fellow men’.
Biography at Remember the Fallen

Photo of Peter Douglas Colin Eliot
Captain Peter Douglas Colin Eliot
House: No 7, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: 14th Lancers.
Died: 25 February 1917 aged 32 in Iraq. Killed in action near Kut.
Battle: Second Battle of Kut. Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 45

Son of the late Sir John Eliot, K.C.I.E., F.R.S. and Lady Eliot, of Bonporteau, Cavalaire, Var, France; husband of Ella Mary Eliot (now Mrs Macartney), of Newstead. Simla, India.
Army III.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Indian Army (14th Murray's Jat Lancers) 1905.

'He obtained an Indian Cadetship at Sandhurst, was commissioned to 14th Jat Lancers in August 1905, and promoted Captain nine years later. He served on the first of the Frontier Expeditions in India, during the war, as extra A.D.C. to Lieutenant-General Blomefield, and on the second as signalling officer. Subsequently he left for another front, where he was killed on February 25th.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

He married Mary Ella Rathbone daughter of Col. William Hans Rathbone R.E. and Bella Grace McNeale on 5 Oct 1914 in Simla, Bengal, India. His widow later married Col Frank Alan George Macartney OBE MC and then Edward Robert Henry Herbert, 5th Earl of Powis, CBE.


Http://www.monchique.com/Ochanoff/ohanov/ochanoff/330.htm
http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/powis1804.htm

Photo of Ernest Christopher Elmhirst
2nd Lieut Ernest Christopher Elmhirst
House: No 2, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: West Riding Regt..
Died: 12 August 1915 aged 21 in Turkey. Killed in action at Suvla Bay.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial 117-119

Son of the Rev. W. H. and Mrs. Elmhirst, of "Elmhirst," Barnsley and Pindar Oaks, Barnsley, b. 1894.
Middle Shell—Science II.
Articled to a Land Agent.
Great War, Private Public Schools' Batt. 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant 8th Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

'He volunteered for service shortly after the war broke out, and was attached for a time to the 4th P. S. Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, and was training in Surrey. He was subsequently gazetted as 2nd Lieut, in the Duke of Wellington's Regt., and went out to Gallipoli in 1915. After an engagement at Suvla Bay on August 12th, he was reported missing, and unfortunately there can be no doubt now that he was killed on that date. Chris Elmhirst was not at school long enough to reach a prominent position, but those who knew him here will remember him as a bright, cheery companion, who took a keen interest in the general life of the School, and helped to make life easier for others, by contributing to their happiness. After he joined the Army his letters showed the interest that he took in the work he was doing, and his eagerness to do his part, wherever his services were required.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Barnsley Chronicle 7 October 1916:
'He was articled to Messrs. Fennell and Green, mining engineers, of Wakefield, when he volunteered for service.
He was officially reported missing at Suvla Bay on August 11 or 12 1915, and is now presumed killed.'

There is a memorial plaque in St Mary's Church, Worsborough to him and his brother William.

His brother Leonard founded the Dartington Hall Trust.
Barnsley Soldiers Barnesley Historian

Service record: WO 339/1534
Brigade War diary: WO 95/4299

Photo of William Elmhirst
Captain William Elmhirst
House: No 2, 1906 - 1911. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 13 November 1916 aged 24 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Serre Road Cemetery No 1 1 D 4

Son of the Rev. W. H. Elmhirst, of "Elmhirst", Barnsley and Pindar Oaks, Barnsley. b. 1892.
Lower V—VI. House Prefect. House XI Cricket.
Scholar Worcester College, Oxford ; B.A. (Third Class Jurisprudence) 1914.
Articled to a Solicitor.
8th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment.

'At School, Will Elmhirst's career was not marked by any exceptional incidents or achievements, but he exercised a very sound influence here. He fully realised the meaning of duty and responsibility, and in a quiet unobtrusive way he always set himself to satisfy the demands of his position. During his time at Oxford he maintained the same high standard that he had aimed at and reached here in really important things. In the Army he was regarded with respect and affection by those with whom he came into contact. Many of these have given written testimony to the debt which they owe to him for his help and guidance.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Barnsley Chronicle 9 December 1916:
He took a scholarship from Malvern to Worcester College, Oxford, where he gained honours in law. He volunteered in 1914, from the office of Messrs. Brown and Elmhirst, solicitors, York where he was articled. His commanding officer writes, "He was a universal favourite both with the officers and men. I looked upon him as one of the best young officers I have had in the battalion. He always took such an interest in his work, was so keen, and nothing was ever too much trouble for him to do, and to do thoroughly. His death is a sad loss, not only to his friends, but to the Army. He was last seen rallying his men close up to the German position."
Barnsley soldiers

Service record: WO 339/21678
War diary: WO 95/1424/2

Photo of Charles Douglas Elston
Captain Charles Douglas Elston
House: No 3, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: Northamptonshire Regt..
Died: 22 November 1917 aged 31 in United Kingdom. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Brompton Cemetery E 6 174469

Son of E. M. Elston, of 21, Cumberland Terrace, Regent's Park, London, and the late Charles Frederick Elston,Hengoed, Walton-on-Thames, b. 1886.
Upper IV Army III.

'Among the number of Old Malvernians serving in the old Army who have fallen must be added the name of Charles D. Elston. His friends at Malvern will remember him best for his sunny disposition and strong sense of humour, which made him deservedly popular. Always, by his own choice, destined for the Army, he entered Sandhurst in 1905, and was gazetted to the Northamptonshire Regt. in 1906, being promoted Captain in 1914. He served through the early months of the war in Flanders, till he was very seriously wounded. After a long time in hospital, he recovered sufficiently to be able to get about, but finally succumbed to his wounds, "after three years of suffering bravely borne," aged 31 years.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

Appointed to Northamptonshire Regiment from the Royal Military College in Oct 1906.
He was made a Lieutenant in Dec 1908 and a Captain in March 1914.
He went to France with the 2nd Battalion landing at Le Havre on Nov 5th 1914. He was with C Company on his first tour at the front line where he was seriously wounded. In Nov 1915 he was placed on half pay due to ill health.
He died on 21st Nov 1917 after suffering from wounds received at Ypres in 1914.
Picture and biography on Flickr from Northampton museum

His war medals were sold at auction by Bonhams in 2003 for £587Bonhams

Photo of Charles Edward James Ensor
Lieutenant Charles Edward James Ensor
House: Sch, 1912 - 1917. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 18 October 1919 aged 21 in United Kingdom. Died from wounds.
Cemetery: Southampton Old Cemetery 40 F 108

Son of Edward Robert Ensor, of 4, Portland St., Southampton, b. 1898.
Upper IV—Matriculation Class.

'Ensor was called up when his time came to a Cadet Battalion, and obtained a commission in the R.G.A. He went out to France in October 1918, and had only been there a fortnight when he was badly gassed and wounded in the shoulder, in the neighbourhood of the Selle River. Since April last he had been attached to the R.G.A. Records Headquarters at Dover. He died at Shorncliffe Military Hospital, on October 18th. He was a vigorous boy, very keen in all that he did, and his early death was a heavy blow to his parents. ' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

On 2nd December 1917 he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the R. G. A. Hampshire T/F.
He served in France and was gassed and wounded in October 1918.
He suffered from the effects until April 1919, when, on being able to resume light duties, he was attached to the R.G.A. Record Office, Dover. He was gazetted a Lieutenant on June 2nd.
In October 1919, he was seized with a sudden illness, and went to Shorncliffe War Hospital for an operation and died the following day on his twenty-first birthday.
Southampton Cenotaph Biography at Sussex History forum

Photo of John Paxman Everitt
2nd Lieut John Paxman Everitt
House: No 8, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: West Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 20 in France. Killed in action near Serre.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 2A 2C 2D

Born: Aug 16th 1896. Son of Charles and Elizabeth E. Everitt, of 12, Inglis Rd., Colchester and 5 Sydenham Rise, Forrest Hill, S.E. Brother: John Page Everitt.
Upper V—VI. House Scholar. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Football; House XI Cricket.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant n t h Yorkshire L.I. 1914 ; 15th Bn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own).

'Before going to France he served with the West Yorks Regiment in Egypt, and was recommended for promotion six weeks ago. His career here marked him out as a leader of the first order, and one cannot speak too highly of the splendid example he set to those over whom he was in authority.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

The following is from 'Malvern College: A 150th Anniversary' by Roy Allen and was read out in a memorial service at Malvern on 1st July 1916:
'Full of grit, a thorough gentleman, with his high ideals and with a cherished hope for the welfare of his School and House, he answered the call of his country in the same grand spirit that was characteristic of him throughout his school days. An extract from a letter to his mother from a Private in his regiment shows in what admiration he was held by his men: "I am proud to be able to say that he was always kind and a gentleman. I admired his principles; he was well liked and admired by his men, and what few of them remain join me in sending our deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement".'

There is a memorial to him at St Leonard at the Hythe Church, Colchester.
Photo of Memorial at Colchester
Malvern Observer article of Centenary Memorial service at Malvern

Service record: WO 339/31115
Battalion war diary: WO 95/2361/3

Photo of William Basil Ewart
Major William Basil Ewart
House: No 2, 1904 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Irish Regt..
Died: 13 February 1920 aged 30 in Ireland. Died of illness contracted on active service.
Cemetery: Belfast Clifton St Antrim

Son of Frederick William and Mary Anne Elizabeth Ewart, of Belfast;, and Lisburn, Ireland, b. 1890.
Middle IV B.
15th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles

Husband of Rebe Annette Ewart, of Belfast.

'After leaving Malvern, he went into business in Belfast. He was in the Territorial Force for some years before the War, and when the war broke out, the work that he had already done, and the keenness that he had displayed marked him out as likely to be a capable officer under war conditions : and this he proved himself to be. He was in the 15th Royal Irish Rifles, and reached the rank of Major. He served in France, being mentioned in despatches (May 1917), there he contracted an illness of which he died on February 13th last. He leaves a widow. To her and to his parents we offer our sincere sympathy.' (Malvernian, Mar 1920)

He joined up in 1914 and served in France. He resigned his Commission on account of ill health in Sept 1917.
He died from disease contracted on active service (Died post-resignation of nephritis) .
Biography leading to recognition by CWGC in 2011
Service record: WO 339/14262

Photo of Stanley Colt Faber
Major Stanley Colt Faber
House: No 1, 1897 - 1899. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 30 March 1917 aged 34 in France. Killed in action at Beaurains.
Cemetery: Faubourg D'amiens, Arras 111 M 13

Son of Rev. H. M. Faber, Malvern College, b. 1883.
Army III—II.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A. 1902 ; Major 1916. 47th Bde. Royal Field Artillery.

'He left School at the age of 16, and was thus prevented from reaching a position of importance here, but before he left he had already shown those qualities of steady perseverance and purposeful application, whether he was engaged in work or in games, which stood him in such good stead in his career in the Army. As a junior he won some distinction in the School sports in '98 and '99; in the latter year his house came second in the competition for the cup.
In 1902 he obtained his commission from Woolwich. He spent several years in India with his battery and in 1912 he became Adjutant to the 1st Welsh (Howitzer) Brigade, R.F.A., T.F., and he was occupying this post when war broke out. In October, 1914, he was promoted Captain, and in the spring of 1915 he was given an ammunition column in one of the divisions which composed the "First Hundred Thousand." Shortly afterwards he obtained command of a battery, and in March, 1916, he was promoted Major. He was mentioned in despatches in January 1917. He was spoken of as an exceptionally good Battery Commander. He was of very great assistance to the Staff owing to the good example that he set. He was an excellent soldier, keen, very thorough, loved by his officers and men. His loss has been very much felt, and it was realised that it would be very difficult to replace him.
Those who knew him at Malvern as a boy can well understand that he came to be an extremely valuable officer in the Army. Devotion to duty and a zealous interest in all that concerned his profession secured for him steady promotion, and the special mention of his services was a thoroughly well deserved recognition of the success which has attended his career.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

In April 1917 the Malvern News reported: “News has been received in Malvern on Tuesday that Major Stanley Faber RFA (son of the late Revd H M Faber of Danby Wiske) has been killed on Friday last – the day before the death of his father who was a Housemaster of Malvern College for many years. He was born in 1883 and educated at Malvern College. He left in 1894 and entered the Royal Military Academy Woolwich.”

There is a commemoration at The Priory Church of St Mary and St Michael, Malvern.
Malvern remembers

Unit War Diary: WO 95/1887/1

Photo of Sydney James Fabian
Corporal Sydney James Fabian
House: No 7, 1907 - 1909. Regiment: Honourable Artillery Company.
Died: 05 December 1914 aged 22 in Belgium. Killed in action near Wytschaete.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate PANEL 9

Son of James Fabian, of 6, Daleham Gardens, Hampstead, London, b. 1892.
Lower Modern II—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. Shooting VIII 1908,09 (captain).
Articled to a Chartered Accountant; H.A.C. 1909.
Service Number 542. 1st Bn. Honourable Artillery Company

'On leaving School he was articled to a firm of Chartered Accountants, joined the H-A,C,, and gave up much of his spare time to work at the School Mission, He became secretary and subsequently captain of the H.A.C. Rugby Football team, and in 1913 was Battalion Shot, He went to France early in September, and though he was twice ordered home from hospital owing to an injured knee, he each time evaded the order, and finally managed to get to the trenches.' (Malvernian, March 1915).

Killed in action at Kemmel .
Biography at hac1418

Unit War Diary: WO 95/1415/4

Photo of Frank Jefferson Farnham
2nd Lieut Frank Jefferson Farnham
House: No 4, 1908 - 1912. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 14 April 1917 aged 24 in France. Accidentally killed at Boyelles.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Boyelles Communal Cemetery Extension 1 C 1

Son of Robert and Gwendoline Farnham, of Emberton House, Bath. Native of Burnham-on-Sea.
Army III—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football; XXII Cricket.
Christ's College, Cambridge; Soccer Blue, 1913-14; played Association Football v. Oxford 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant London Regt. 1914 ; Served in Infantry from Sept., 1914 to Feb., 1916, resigned 1916;
R.M.A. Woolwich ; 239th Siege Bty. Royal Garrison Artillery.

'Active in brain and body, he attained, despite intervals of serious illness, a large measure of success in work and games, and became a prominent figure in the life of the School. On leaving Malvern he went up to Christ's College, Cambridge, and played Association Football for the University against Oxford in 1914. Volunteering for service at the beginning of war, he was given a commission in a battalion of the London Regt., with which he went to France in May 1915. In January 1916 he resigned his commission to enter the R.M.A., Woolwich, for which he had been originally destined. In the following August he was gazetted to the R.G.A., and in January proceeded to the front. He was accidentally killed on April 14th, while advancing with his battery. He showed himself an efficient and popular officer and manifested coolness and courage in many tight places.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Service record: WO 339/44616

Photo of Percy Blake Faskally
Captain Percy Blake Faskally
House: No 6, 1893 - 1898. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 19 December 1919 aged 39 in United Kingdom. Died from gas poisoning at Frevent.
Cemetery: Highgate Cemetery 52 41671

Born: 12 Dec 1879. Son of Dr. G. B. Faskally, Umzimkulu, Africa, b. 1880.
Army Side—Modern II. School Prefect. Ledbury Cap ; House XI Football; Lieutenant in Corps.
1899. 5th Royal Dublin Fusiliers. 2nd Lieutenant.

'He was a very fair runner but otherwise did not distinguish himself greatly at School. On leaving School he was for many years ranching in California, and when the war broke out he came home and ultimately obtained a commission in the Royal Fusiliers. After a long illness he died on Dec. 18th of last year in hospital from the results of being gassed. ' (Malvernian, Dec 1919)

Permanent Address: 70 East 66 Street, New York City
Address for Correspondence: 31 Hill Street, Knightsbridge & 9 Hill St.

25 Jan 1918. Debility report. He has lived in the Tropics and has had Malaria in 1910. On Jan 8th 1918, he went sick with severe headaches, vomiting but no Pyrexia. Blood examined for Malaria but nothing found. He came home 21st Jan. There were no physical signs but his eyes are defective and glasses are to be worn.

He held a commission in the 23rd Royal Fusiliers and was demobilised in March 1919. Shortly after he proceeded to Poland as a Staff Captain on General Haller's staff, was invalided home in October and died from Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Exhaustion at the 3rd London General hospital on the 17th December 1919.

Gravestone inscription at Highgate Cemetery (west):
In proud and ever loving memory of Capt Percy Blake Faskally 24th Royal Fusiliers. Younger son of the late Surgeon Col. And Mrs. Faskally. He was severely gassed at Frevent in France and passed over on the 17th of December, 1919. Aged 39 years. A brave soldier.

"Would God, I had died for thee. Absolom, my son, my son." 2nd Samuel. 18 Chapt. 33rd verse.
Photograph of grave at Findagrave

Service record: WO 339/12376

Photo of Charles Frederick Fearn
2nd Lieut Charles Frederick Fearn
House: No 5, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
Died: 04 July 1915 aged 19 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 1

Son of Charles and Alice G. Fearn, of 43, Adelaide Rd., Shepherd's Bush, London and Holmsted Place, Cuckfield. B. 1896.
Modern III—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. XL Cricket ; House XI Football.
London University.
Private in 1st Bn. Honourable Artillery Company.

'He was gazetted in August to the 4th (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was attached to the 2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers, and fell on July 4th in France.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

Photo of Charles Eustace Fishbourne
Captain Charles Eustace Fishbourne
House: No 3, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 10 June 1915 aged 30 in United Kingdom. Died at Chatham.
Cemetery: Gresford All Saints Denbighshire SW CORNER

Son of Rev. E. A. Fishbourne, Gresford Vicarage, Wrexham. b. 1885,
Upper Modern II- —Army I. House Scholar. School Prefect. XXII Football; House XI Cricket.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.E. 1904; Lieutenant 1907; employed on Railway Survey, Uganda and E. African Protectorates, 1907—9; under Board of Trade 1909—12 ; retired 1913 ; Asst. Commercial Manager London General Omnibus Co. Ltd. 1913; Cuthbert Peek Grant, Royal Geographical Society, 1910.
Great War, rejoined 1914 (over seas). Died June 10, 1915; Despatches.

'After passing through Woolwich and Chatham he was commissioned in the Royal Engineers in December 1904, and subsequently was employed under the Colonial Office from June 1907 to November 1908 in Uganda upon important survey work, for which he was highly commended, and the Royal Geographical Society awarded him the Cuthbert Peek Grant. In October 1909 he was appointed under the Board of Trade upon the London Traffic Commission. In January 1913 he retired into the Special Reserve, R.E., on taking up a post as Assistant General Manager to the London General Omnibus Company.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

On the outbreak of the war he rejoined, went to the Front with the 9th Field Company R.E., 21st August 1914, and served till 18th November 1914, when he was wounded at Ploegsteert Wood, and invalided home. On his recovery he was appointed Adjutant to the R.E. Reserves at Chatham. He died at Field House, Beaconsfield, 10th June 1915, of Spotted Fever* contracted at Chatham. He married at Llanbedr on the 8th June 1911 to Mary Elizabeth Holland, 89, Overstrand Mansions, Battersea, S.W., daughter of William Gaskell Holland and left two sons, Patrick Alexander, born 10th February 1913; and Charles Michael Eustace, born 2nd November 1915.

Detailed biography


Service record: WO 339/6109

Photo of Geoffrey Herbert Fisher
2nd Lieut Geoffrey Herbert Fisher
House: Sch, 1902 - 1906. Regiment: Sherwood Foresters.
Died: 25 October 1915 aged 27 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Cemetery: Etaples Military Cemetery 1 A 13

Son of H orace rthur and Sarak Kate Fisher, Bramcote Hills, Nott and Arno Vale, Notts. B. 1888.
Lower Shell - upper V. House Prefect.
Clare College, Cambridge; B.A (Third class Law Tripos) 1908; represented Cambridge University in Boxing; in British Columbia.
Great War, Private British Columbia Horse 1914; 2nd Lieutenant 8th Batt Sherwood Foresters. Died of wounds.

'Geoffrey Fisher made many friends during his time at Malvern. He was somewhat old for his years, with ideas and opinions unusual in a schoolboy, at the same time he was very keen in all things connected with his house. He was in British Columbia when war was declared, and at once enlisted in the British Columbia Horse, but finding the regiment was not being sent on active service, he obtained a commission in the 8th Sherwood Foresters. He joined his regiment in France in August, and died of wounds on October 25th.' (Malvernian, Dec 1915).

He was wounded by a German grenade in both thighs and left arm during attacks at Hohenzollern Redoubt and died of wounds 25th October 1915, age 26, at No. 6 General Hospital, Etaples, France.

His younger brother Captain John Wilfred Fisher of the 10th Battalion The Sherwood Foresters also served and died during the 'Great War'
Biography at Nottinghamshire roll of honour Sherwood Foresters

Photo of James Fisher
Captain James Fisher
House: No 7, 1908 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 23 February 1919 aged 25 in United Kingdom. Died of pneumonia.
Cemetery: Barrow In Furness Cemetery I 505

Son of James and M.A. Fisher, Drumard, Barrow-in-Furness. B. 1894.
Upper IV B -Modern III.
Afterwards at Sedbergh School; in business; 4th Batt. Royal Lancaster Regt. 1913.
Great War, mobilised 1914 (overseas), Captain. Died February 23, 1919.
Husband of Lina Frances Fisher, of Drumard, Barrow-in-Furness

'He was still quite a small boy when he left Malvern to go Sedbergh, but extraordinarily bright and quick. He was in the Territorial Force before the war, and did good service through the five stressful years. Early this year he contracted influenza, pneumonia intervened, and he died at Waterloo, near Liverpool, on February 23rd, leaving a widow to mourn his untimely loss. He was only twenty-four.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Photo of John Wilfred Fisher
Captain John Wilfred Fisher
House: Sch, 1906 - 1910. Regiment: Sherwood Foresters.
Died: 08 July 1916 aged 24 in France. Died of wounds.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Heilly Station Cemetery Mercourt-L'abbe 1 A 15

Son of Horace Arthur and S. Kate Fisher, Arno Vale, Nottingham. b 1892
Modern III - Upper Shell. House Prefect.
Trinity College, Cambridge; B.A. (Third Class Theological Tripos)
1913; Schoolmaster.
Great War, Inns of Court O.T.C. 1914; Captain Sherwood Foresters. Died of wounds July 8 1916; D.S.O., Despatches.

'The fourth and youngest brother of a School House family, John Wilfred Fisher throughout his school career was a sound and trustworthy boy, full of quiet purpose. The following extract from the "Times" shows how he rose to the occasion, and what a loss he is to his country: "Captain John Wilfred Fisher, D.S.O., Sherwood Foresters, died of wounds on July 8. He joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. in August 1914, obtained a commission in the Sherwood Foresters, and went to the front a year ago. Captain Fisher won the D.S.O. in March for conspicuous gallantry, the official record of his conduct being as follows: 'When the enemy blew up a portion of the front trench he drove off their attack and skilfully organised the defence. He continued fighting long after he was wounded, and set a fine example to all around him.' Captain Fisher, who was mentioned in despatches in April, had been four times wounded within nine months—the last time fatally." ' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

He was wounded at Sanctuary Wood, Ypres, Belgium, 30th October 1915 by a German sniper and rejoined his battalion 11th December 1915 at Ypres, when he took over command of "D" Company. He was wounded again 16th February 1916 at Ypres.
He was awarded the D.S.O. with the following citation " For conspicuous gallantry on the 14th February 1916, near Ypres/Commines Canal. When the enemy blew up a portion of the front line trench, he drove off their attack and skilfully organised the defence. He continued fighting long after he was wounded, and set a fine example to all around him".

He was again wounded when in the Quadrangle support line near Contalmaison on the Somme, France, 7th July 1916, and died the following day.
Biography at Sherwood Foresters

Photo of Eric Murray Forster
2nd Lieut Eric Murray Forster
House: No 2, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: Essex Regt..
Died: 03 May 1917 aged 22 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Athies Communal Cemetery Extension K 2

Son of James Young Forster, Ravensworth, Sutton, Surrey. B. 1895.
Upper IV A — Upper Shell.
Government Experimental Farm Natal; Farmer in Rhodesia .
Great War, O.T.C. 1916; 2nd Lieutenant3rd Bn. attd. 2nd Bn Essex Regt. Killed in action May 3, 1917.
Attack between Roeux and Gavrelles.

'He was in Rhodesia when the war broke out, and early in 1915 he was very anxious to come home to fight for his country. As he was in sole charge of a farm, his colleague being at the Front in France, he was persuaded to remain at his post. But the desire to take his part in his country's cause grew stronger and stronger, and he came home to join the forces a little over a year ago. As he had been in the O.T.C. at School, he was sent to join a Cadet Battalion at Lichfield, and in the following October he was gazetted to the Essex Regiment, and went to the Front about the middle of January. After an attack on May 3rd he was reported missing, believed killed, and later on he was reported killed.
He left School rather earlier than most boys, as it was decided that he should go out to farm in S. Africa, and should go through a course of work at the Government College at Cedara, Natal. Those of his time at Malvern will remember the great pleasure that he gave by his delightful singing and the special help that he rendered in the Chapel Services. His intimate friends will deeply regret the death of one whose companionship was always marked by cheerfulness and affection, and no one who knew him will ever forget the quiet contentment which he always displayed.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Attested: 23.5.1916
Mobilised: 27.5.1916 (No 8 Cadet Bn)
Discharged on receiving commission: 25.9.1917

Killed in action near Fampoux

Service record: WO 339/62408

Photo of Cusack Grant Forsyth
Lieutenant Colonel Cusack Grant Forsyth
House: No 9, 1902 - 1904. Regiment: Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 14 September 1916 aged 29 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Blighty Valley Cemetery Authuille 1 F 13

Son of Colonel Frederick Arthur Forsyth and Ellen Sanford Forsyth, Netherleigh, Leamington. b. 1887.
Army III - I. House Prefect. House XI Cricket and Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Yorkshire Regt. 1906; Captain 1914.
Great War, temporary Lieut-Colonel 1916. Killed in action, September 14 1916; D.S.O., Legion d'Honneur (Chevalier), Despatches
2nd Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers attd. 6th Bn. Yorkshire Regiment

The Times: "Lieutenant-Colonel C. G. Forsyth, D.S.O., Yorkshire Regiment, who was killed on September 14th, 1916, passed into the Army from Sandhurst in 1906 and went immediately to South Africa, where he joined the Yorkshire Regiment. On returning to England two years later he was adjutant for two courses to a mounted infantry battalion at Longmoor, and in 1910 was made adjutant to his battalion. When the war broke out, Colonel Forsyth's regiment was in Guernsey, and at that time he was going through the School for Instruction for Flying, but was recalled to his regiment, which went to Belgium in October 1914, and took part in the first battle of Ypres, at which Lieut. Forsyth, as he then was, was severely wounded. He returned to his regiment in March 1915, having been awarded the D.S O. in January of that year. In February the President of the French Republic bestowed on him the Croix de Chevalier of the Legion of Honour "in recognition of his distinguished conduct during the campaign." On resuming his military duties Colonel Forsyth became second in command and adjutant to the Wilts Regiment under Colonel Leatham, and after the death in action of that officer at the battle of Hulluch he took command of the regiment, continuing in command for three days after being wounded. On recovering Colonel Forsyth was sent out to Egypt, where he was given command of a Yorkshire battalion which had just come from Gallipoli. After service in Egypt he went to another front last July with a Yorkshire battalion as temporary major, but was soon promoted lieutenant-colonel (dated February 9). A brother officer writes: “In his death the Army has lost one of its most brilliant and promising young officers, and I should think at the time he was given command of the Yorkshire Battalion he was probably the youngest commanding officer in the Regular Army. He had a great future in front of him if only he had been spared to come through this war." Those who knew Cusack Forsyth at school will not be surprised to hear that he became "one of the finest officers in the Service"; such was the opinion of a senior officer. As a boy, keen, alert, smart, endowed with good abilities, extremely popular, he was not likely as a man to disappoint the high hopes formed of him. He was killed in one of the captured trenches, alter he had completed the task—a hard task too—that had been allotted to his battalion. (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Service record: WO 339/6579

Photo of Cecil Croker Fox
Lieutenant Cecil Croker Fox
House: No 4, 1893 - 1895. Regiment: East Surrey Regt..
Died: 15 September 1916 aged 37 in France. Killed in action at Flers.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 6B/6C

Son f George Croker Fox, Penjerrick and Pennance Cottage, Falmouth. b. 1879.
III - Shell.
Architect in Vancouver.
Great War, Inns of Court O.T.C. 1914;
2nd Lieutenant Worcester Regt. 1915. Lieutenant 12th Bn East Surrey Regt.

'He left Malvern too early to reach a prominent position in the school, but he will be remembered by contemporaries as a boy of refined character and endowed with considerable ability as an artist. On leaving school he accompanied his father to British Columbia, where he became a member of a firm of architects at Vancouver. Shortly after the outbreak of the war he returned to England and joined the Inns of Court O.T. C. In April 1915 he was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment. After a course at the Staff College, Camberley, he was transferred to the East Surrey Regiment, being promoted Lieutenant in December.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Photo of Francis Neville Wilson Fox
2nd Lieut Francis Neville Wilson Fox
House: No 2, 1908 - 1914. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 31 July 1917 aged 23 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: New Irish Farm XXV F 11

Born: October 29th 1894. Son of Francis W. Fox and A. Denise Fox, Uplands, Crown Hill, Devon.
Lover IV - Matriculation Class. House Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 14th Bn Welsh Regt. 1914.

'In November, 1914, he was given his commission, and went to the front in September 1916. He was killed on July 31st, while leading his men into action. Letters from those who knew him as a soldier all speak highly of his courage and coolness, and, above all, of that unfailing cheeriness which won him the affection of men and officers. Under the surface, too, there was a depth of feeling that perhaps only his most intimate friends were aware of. He has left behind him the memory of "a great example of a soldier and a gentleman." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Service record: WO 339/15393

Photo of Thomas Noel Fox
2nd Lieut Thomas Noel Fox
House: No 4, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Somerset Light Inf..
Died: 12 December 1918 aged 22 in Bulgaria. Died in Bulgaria.
Cemetery: Sofia War Cemetery 111 C 7

Born 19th Dec 1896. Son of James Charles Fox (Rector of Abbas and Temple Coombe) and Mabel Harriet Anne Fox, Templecombe Rectory, Somerset.
Upper IV B - Lower Modern I. House Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 9th Somerset L.I; attd. 79th Coy. Machine Gun Corps (Infantry). Died in Bulgaria

'He obtained a commission in the 9th Battalion, Somerset L.I., immediately after leaving School, in January 1915, but was transferred a year later to the Machine-Gun Corps, and completed his training at Grantham. In July 1916 he was attached to the 26th Division at Salonica, and served for two years in the trenches between the Vardar and Lake Doiran. He came home on leave last August, and was on his way to re-join his unit in Bulgaria, when, after experiencing bitter weather in the mountains, he contracted pneumonia, and died on December 12th. He was buried at Roustchouk. A capital straightforward, manly boy, he proved himself a keen officer, cheerful under whatever conditions, and was beloved by his men.' (Malvernian, Feb 1919).

14 Jan 1915 to 30 Jun 1916 - 1st Appointment
1 Jul 1916 to 30 Sep 1918 - Somerset Light Infantry
1 Oct 1918 to 12 Dec 1918 - Machine Gun Corps
6th Nov 1918. Arrived in Salonika
12th Dec 1918. Died of bronchial pneumonia at No 79 Field Ambulance, Salonika.
War Memorial, St. Mary's Church, Templecombe, Somerset

Service record: WO 374/25397

Photo of Lachlan Henry Veitch Fraser
Lieutenant Lachlan Henry Veitch Fraser
House: No 8, 1908 - 1912. Regiment: Middlesex Regt..
Died: 24 February 1915 aged 21 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Godezonne Farm Cemetery 1 A 7

Son of Major Francis and Beatrice de Dombal Fraser, Tornaveen, Torphins. B. 1894.
Lower IV - Army II.
House Prefect. XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 4th Bn. Middlesex Regt. 1914; Lieutenant 1915.
Great War, killed in action February 24, 1915; Despatches.

'Naturally brave and regardless of risks he was well qualified for the work which our officers have been called upon to perform in this war. "The men would have done anything for him or have gone anywhere," a brother officer writes. ' (Malvernian, Apr 1915).
Obituary at IWM

Photo of Frank Ernest Allien Freeman
2nd Lieut Frank Ernest Allien Freeman
House: No 7, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 21 March 1918 aged 21 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 7-10

Born July 2nd 1897. Son of Ernest A. and Florence M. Freeman, Ambleside Avenue, Streatham. And Hendon Hall, b. 1897.
Middle IV A - Matricu1ation Class. House Prefect. XI Cricket.
Great War, Private Labour Batt. ; 2nd Lieutenant 18th Div. Ammunition Col. Royal Field Artillery attd. 83rd Bde.

'Frank Freeman came to Malvern the third term of 1911. He was the only son of Mr. E. A. Freeman of Streatham. As a small boy he showed signs of considerable promise in football, but he developed so late that he never got into the Football XI. He, however, showed skill as a slow bowler, and in his last season got into the Cricket XL. He got several Form Prizes, and was a keen member of the O.T.C. On leaving school he enlisted in a Labour Battalion, and was sent to the Front, being eventually transferred to a Battalion of the K.R.R. While with this Battalion he was recommended for a commission in the R.F.A., but was wounded before he could be sent home for training. On his recovery he was sent to the R.F.A. Cadet School at Exeter, and was eventually given a commission and posted to the Brigade commanded by Colonel Lyon at Ipswich for further training before proceeding Overseas. He was sent abroad early in February, and was killed on March 21st, the very first day of the great German advance. He had developed to an extraordinary degree after leaving school, and had grown into a fine fellow and showed signs of making a very good officer. Universally popular, and keen on everything he took up, he will be mourned by all who knew him at Malvern and elsewhere.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Joined Bn in the field on 14 Sep 1916.
Wounded on 13 Oct 1916 and posted to England.
Posted to RFA Officer cadet School on 18 Jun 1917.
Discharged on receiving commission in RFA: 7 Dec 1917.

2 sisters: (Mrs Jenkins and Miss Sylivia Freeman)

Service Record: WO 339/87211

Photo of Albert Herman Friedlaender
Corporal Albert Herman Friedlaender
House: Day, 1886 - 1886. Regiment: South African Horse.
Died: 25 October 1916 aged 44 in Tanzania. Died of wounds in E. Africa.
Battle: East African Campaign. Cemetery: Iringa Cemetery V A 15

Son of Rev. Herman and Julia Friedlaender, of "Byfield," 16, Hurst Rd., Buckhurst Hill, Essex, formerly of Dulwich House, North Malvern. Born at Jerusalem.
Lower IV.
Mining Engineer in South Airica : South African War 1899—1902;
Captain, Brabant’s Scouts.
Great War, Private Smith African Horse.

'Since 1893 he had been in South Africa, chiefly engaged in gold mining. During the Boer War he served in Brabant's Horse and Kitchener's Fighting Scouts. He was one of the three officers selected by Colonel Grenfell for special service in the operations against Hertzog, Malan and Kritzinger in the Cape Colony, and later on against Beyer's in the Northern Transvaal. He left the Army at the end of that war with the rank of Captain and returned to mining work. He was employed for several years on the Knight's Deep property. At the outbreak of the present war he enlisted as a private in the South African Horse for service in East Africa, with the intention of coming to England at the end of that campaign and re-enlisting here. He, however, died of wounds received in action on October 25, 1916, in East Africa.' (Malvernian, Mar 1917).

Photo of Edward Meaburn Fry
Lieutenant Edward Meaburn Fry MC
House: No 3, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 23 August 1918 aged 28 in France. Killed in action at Colincamps, France.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Sucrerie Mil Cemetery Colincamps 1 J 16

Son of S Fry, Cleeve Mill, Goring. b 1890
Middle Shell - Matriculation Class. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Football.
Tobacco Planter. Great War, 2nd Lieutenant "D" Bty. 211th Bde. Royal Field Artillery M.C.

'Ned Fry served his House with unswerving loyalty, and a strong dislike for anything petty or mean made his influence all for good. A natural restlessness and a dread of falling into a humdrum life inclined him to farming, which he tried at home and abroad. As soon as war broke out, he fretted like a young horse to be off. In his service abroad he was face to face with many a peril, but he knew no fear when duty called, and he met his death when on observation duty at a notoriously dangerous place. Letters about him all touch on one characteristic, his love for his fellowmen, and the loyal leadership he showed at School he showed also in fighting for his country. It was particularly touching that his great friend here, Frankie Benitz, was killed just previously.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918)

Military Cross citation: 'When acting as forward observation officer his task was to follow-up the infantry attack. As the enemy put down a most intense barrage, he had to cross this on four occasions before he was able to establish communication with his battery and brigade headquarters. His resource and determination throughout this trying period were most commendable.'

Photo of John Duncan Bertie Fulton
Lieutenant Colonel John Duncan Bertie Fulton CB
House: No 4, 1890 - 1893. Regiment: Royal Flying Corps.
Died: 11 November 1915 aged 39 in United Kingdom. Died on active service.
Cemetery: Brompton Cemetery E 2 173362

Son of Frederick George Fulton and Mrs. Fulton, 76 Longridge Road, S.W. b 1876.
Army II-I. House Prefect. House XI Football.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; R.F.A 1896, Major 1913; from 1911 attached successively to Balloon School; Air Batt. R.E., and Royal Flying Corps ; Chief Inspector R.F.C. 1913; South African War 1899-1901, Despatches (2); C.B. 1914,
Great War, Colonel.
CB - Companion of the Bath
Chief Inspector of the Aeronautical Inspection Dept. Royal Flying Corps and Royal Field Artillery

'Lieut.-Colonel Fulton was one of the most distinguished of Old Malvernian officers, The Times says of him: "Colonel Fulton entered the Royal Artillery in March 1896 and served throughout the South African War, where he took part in the operations for the relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Coleuso. He was also present at the actions at Spion Kop, Vaal Kranz, Tugela Heights, Pieter's Hill, and Laing's Nek ; he was twice mentioned in despatches and received both medals with eight clasps. In 1910 Captain Fulton taught himself flying on a Bleriot monoplane which he bought in June of that year, and in November he qualified for the Royal Aero Club's certificate on Salisbury Plain, being the first military officer on full pay to obtain it. In the following year he was appointed to the newly-formed Army Air Battalion, and was sent to Paris to purchase the first airplane for that Corps. From May 1912 to December 1913 he served as Instructor at the Central Flying School, and in the last-named month became Chief Inspector Royal Flying Corps, a position which he held until the end of last year, when he was appointed Chief Inspector, Aeronautical Inspection Department. He was created C.B. in 1914." He died on active service, November n 11th , 1915.' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).
Photo at NPG

Photo of Wolseley Haigh Furley
Lieutenant Wolseley Haigh Furley
House: No 4, 1910 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Scots.
Died: 25 April 1918 aged 22 in Belgium. Killed in action near Wytschaete.
Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P 11-14 and 162

Son of Frederick William and Helen Maud Furley (nee Haig), Sunbury, Canterbury. b. 1896
Middle Shell - VI. School Prefect. XI Football; XL Cricket. Champion Athlete. Cadet Officer.
Oriel College, Oxford.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Batt. The Royal Scots.

'Under normal conditions he would have gone up to Oriel College, Oxford, but in July 1915 he obtained a commission in the 3rd Battn. (Special Reserve) of The Royal Scots. He was sent to France in April 1916, and was for more than a year in the front line and fought all through the Battle of the Somme. On May 3rd, 1917, he was severely wounded at Monchy le Preux. He was mentioned in despatches (May 1917) and promoted Lieutenant in the following July.' Returning to France last March, he was reported missing on April 25th. The Army Council have since announced that they "were constrained to conclude" that he was killed in action on that date. He was an athlete of the true Public School type, generous, modest, unspoilt by success. As a Prefect he set himself a high standard, and gave of his best to his House and School. Of warm affections and full of good-will to all; he smiled his way through difficulties, and perhaps the only cloud which overcast the enjoyment of five happy years at Malvern was the fear that through weakness of eyesight he might be debarred from military service. Of his work in the war it is enough to say that he upheld to the full the traditions of the great regiment in which it was his pride to serve.' (Malvernian, Feb 1919)

Previously wounded 3rd May, 1917, at Monchy-le-Preux, while attached to 2nd Bn.

Photo of Thomas Gair
Lieutenant Thomas Gair
House: No 1, 1903 - 1908. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 09 September 1917 aged 28 in Belgium. Killed in action near St Julien.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P 4-6 and 162

Son of John Hamilton Gair and Martha Grace Gair, Skelwith Bridge, Ambleside. b 1889.
Middle V - VI. Minor Scholar. School Prefect.
New College, Oxford; B.A. (Second Class History) 1912; articled to Clerk of Lancashire County Council.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 2nd West Lancashire Brigade R.F.A. (T.F - 'A' Bty 276th Bde.) 1914; Lieutenant. Killed in action near St. Julien, September 9, 1917.
The Thomas Gair Exhibition was founded in his memory.

'When war broke out he joined the R. F. A., but before the Brigade went abroad he was appointed Instructor at the Bettisfield Training Camp. In January last he once again re-joined his Brigade, which was then in Flanders, and he was in the third battle of Ypres on July 31st. On September 9th he was doing a 24 hour tour of duty with an infantry battalion. Their headquarters were heavily shelled, and three-quarters of the unit became casualties. He attended to the wounded, and when a shell hit the dug-out occupied by the battalion runners and signallers, he went to them, anxious to know if any of his own men were among those hit. Just as he was about to enter the dug-out a shell hit him, and he was killed instantaneously.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Memorial at Holy Trinity Church, Bog Labs, Brathay, South Lakeland, Cumbria

Photo of Leonard Franklin Gale
Corporal Leonard Franklin Gale
House: No 8, 1898 - 1902. Regiment: Queen's Own Oxford Hussars.
Died: 26 May 1915 aged 31 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 6

Son of J. J. Gale, Benson, Wallingford, Berks. b. 1884.
Lower V —Remove. School Prefect. Head of House. XXII Football; XL Cricket; Ledbury Cap.
Surveyor; A. S. I.
Great War, Corporal Oxfordshire Hussars 1914. Killed in action, May 26, 1915.

Photo of Hubert John Game
Lieutenant Hubert John Game
House: No 7, 1904 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery / R. F. C..
Died: 08 June 1917 aged 27 in United Kingdom. Killed in flying accident.
Cemetery: Narborough All Saints, Norfolk

Son of George Beale Game & Clara Game, Broadway, Worcestershire. b. 1890.
Middle Shell - Upper V - Army II
In business.
Great War, Lieutenant R.F.A. attached R.F.C.

He was serving with No 53 (Training) Squadron when he was killed in a flying accident due to Wing failure pulling out of a dive in the Narborough area on 8 June 1917 in BE2e A2794.

Service record: WO 339/12146
Biography at theaerodrome.com Accident details

Photo of George Henry Gardner
Captain George Henry Gardner
House: No 5, 1897 - 1902. Regiment: 21st Lancers.
Died: 25 August 1915 aged 32 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Green Hill Cemetery 1 E 7

S on of Sir Robert Gardner, Ashley House, Dublin. b. 1883.
Lower IV -Army I. House Prefect.
21st Lancers (from Militia) 1902 ; Captain 1912.

Husband of Dorothy Gardner.

The Times: '' Captain Gardner joined the 21st Empress of India's Lancers in 1902, when they were stationed in Dublin, being promoted Lieutenant in 1909 and Captain in October 1912. He was appointed Adjutant of the Royal Bucks Hussars Yeomanry in March 1914, and came from India to take up this appointment; he was with the Yeomanry for a year before going with them on active service to Egypt and Gallipoli. Captain Gardner was a keen polo player, and played for his regiment in many tournaments both at home, in Egypt, and in India. He was believed killed while leading his men in a charge on August 21st, 1915."
Detailed biography at whitchurch.org

Photo of John Charles Gardom
Lieutenant John Charles Gardom
House: No 6, 1899 - 1903. Regiment: Essex Regt..
Died: 06 August 1915 aged 31 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Twelve Tree Copse, Dardenelles C 117

Born: 7th April 1884, Hill Crest, Theydon Bois. Son o f Charles Henry and Annette Emily Gardom, Hylands, Forest Road, Walthamstow and Longfield Cottage, Tadworth, Surrey.
Lower V-VI. School Prefect. XL Cricket.
Stock Exchange.
12th Bn. attd. 1st Bn Essex Regiment
Gold Medal Skater of the National Skating Association in 1911.

'At the outbreak of the war he joined H. M. forces, and was sent out to the Dardanelles as Lieut, of the 12th Bn. of the Essex Regt. Reported as missing in August last, under circumstances which seemed to admit of no real doubt as to his fate, he was not officially reported as killed until January of this year. He was a boy of singular charm and cheeriness of manner, and extremely popular at school.' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

War Service:
England: 6th August 1914 to 16th Sep 1914
Embarked from Southampton: 17 Sep 1914
Exhaustion: 6 Dec 1914
Returned to Duty: 9 Dec 1914
Appointed temp 2nd Lieut and left for England: 9 Jan 1915
Gallipoli Campaign. 1915.

Following is a statement concerning his death from Cpl W. Challis:
'Mr Gardom was in charge of my platoon on the 6th August. We were ordered to take a T.T. (Turkish Trench) at No Man’s Land in front H. 12 Achi Baba. I saw Mr Gardom jump into the T.T. with three men. Only one of the four returned and he told me that the other two men and Mr Gardom were killed, Mr Gardom being shot in the arm and mouth and again just as he was actually jumping into the trench. '
greatwarliveslost.com

Service record: WO 339/19869

Photo of Frank Hill Gaskell
Lieutenant Colonel Frank Hill Gaskell
House: No 4, 1892 - 1895. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 17 May 1916 aged 38 in France. Died of wounds at Merville.
Cemetery: Merville Communal V11 A 17

Son of J. Gaskell C.B.E., and Emily Mary Gaskell, Cowbridge, Glamorgan.
Lower IV - Lower Modern I.
University College of S. Wales;
Served in South African War with 3rd Batt. Welch Regt., Queen’s Medal with 5 Clasps.
Solicitor 1902. Barrister, Middle Temple, 1910 ; twice unsuccessfully contested East Glamorgan.
Great War (overseas), Captain 3rd Batt Welch Regt 1914; Lieut.-Colonel 16th Welch.

Husband of Violet Gaskell, of Boscobel, Llanishen, Cardiff.

'He practised for some years at Cardiff as a Solicitor and subsequently as a Barrister on the South Wales circuit. Taking an active part in public affairs and keenly interested in politics, he fought two Parliamentary elections and was the prospective Unionist Candidate for South Glamorgan. In the South African War he served with the 3rd V.B. Welsh Regt., and was promoted to Staff rank. At the outbreak of the present war he re-joined as a Captain, and was attached to the 2nd Welsh. He was wounded in the fighting on the Aisne and sent home, where he raised the Cardiff City Battalion, to the command of which he was appointed. He was severely wounded on May 16th, and died on the following day.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Inscription at ST JOHN'S CHURCH, Cardiff: 'IN LOVING MEMORY OF/ LIEUT COLONEL FRANK HILL/ GASKELL OF THIS CITY/ IN THE GREAT WAR HE RAISED AND/ COMMANDED THE 16TH (CARDIFF CITY) BATTALION OF THE WELCH REGIMENT/ HE WAS TWICE SEVERELY WOUNDED/ AND DIED OF WOUNDS/ AT MERVILLE FRANCE MAY 17TH 1916/ AGED 37 YEARS/ "WHO HAD IT NOT IN HIM TO FEAR"'

Photo of Howard Raymond Gillett
2nd Lieut Howard Raymond Gillett
House: No 4, 1914 - 1916. Regiment: Royal Naval Air Service Manston.
Died: 06 April 1918 aged 19 in United Kingdom. Killed flying in England.
Cemetery: Hampstead WC 620

Son of Raymond Gillett, 101 Broadhurst Gardens, Hampstead. b. 1899.
Middle V - Lower VI.
In business.
Great War, Flight Sub-Lieutenant R.N.

'He was a most attractive boy, who promised to become a leader in his House, had not an opening in business taken him early from school. Early in 1917 he offered himself for the R.N.A.S., and on his eighteenth birthday was accepted as a Cadet. He gained his Pilot's Certificate, and was under orders to go to France on April 8th. Two days earlier, while practising certain manoeuvres in a single-seater, he was killed in an accident for which he was in no way responsible. He was an exceptionally good pilot, courageous, and full of resource, while his happy and enthusiastic nature made him a general favourite. He was buried with full military honours in Hampstead Cemetery', on April 11th.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

He was flying a Sopwith Camel B5688 at Manston War School when he was killed in an accident.

Service record: ADM 273/17/256 Invisionzone

Photo of Ronald John Gilman
Lieutenant Ronald John Gilman MC
House: No 3, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Warwickshire Yeomanry.
Died: 15 July 1918 aged 20 in France. Died from exposure in torpedoed ship.
Cemetery: Etaples Military Cemetery XXV111 O 10

Born March 18th 1898. Son of Henry and Elizabeth Gilman (Oil and Colour merchant), Nuthurst Grange, Hockley Heath, Warwickshire.
Lower Modern II — Modern I.
Birmingham University
Articled to a Chartered Accountant.

'R. J. Gilman, like his elder brother, will always be remembered here for his simple, straightforward character. He had grit and determination which carried him up the School and gave every promise of success in the future. His Major wrote of him: "Young, keen and popular with everyone: just the right fellow to make an ideal officer"; and that is exactly what his friends here would expect him to be. He obtained his commission, in December 1915, at the age of 17. He served in Egypt and Palestine, and was wounded on Nov. 8th, 1917, in charge of the Yeomanry. After this action he was recommended for the Military Cross, but he did not receive it. On his way to another front his ship was torpedoed, and he was one of the few to go down with her. The shock and exposure are believed to have been the cause of his illness and death, three weeks after his arrival, in a military hospital abroad.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

On 8th November 1917, he sustained a gun shot wound just below the left shoulder.

Service record: WO 374/27389

Photo of William Francis Jervis Gordon
Private William Francis Jervis Gordon
House: No 2, 1910 - 1912. Regiment: Canadian Trench Mortar Battery.
Died: 04 January 1918 aged 22 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Extension 111. A.B

Son of J. H. Gordon, 8 Ellenborough Park, Weston-super-mare. b.1896.
Upper IV B - Modern III.
Farmer in Canada.
8th Canadian Light Trench Mortar Battery

'He was quite young when he left school. He was not here long enough to reach any prominent position, but he gave evidence of qualities which were likely in later years to make him a useful man and a good citizen. After leaving Malvern he went on a farm in England for a few months, and then he went to Canada and took up farming in Ontario. He enlisted in Toronto in a Canadian Regiment, and was trained there for some months. Then he came over to Folkestone, and almost immediately after that he left for France. There he volunteered for the Trench Mortars. He was attached to a Canadian Battery, and was killed in action in January last.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Photo of Arthur Graham
Private Arthur Graham
House: No 2, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: Cheshire Regt..
Died: 27 April 1918 aged 35 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Longuenesse St Omer VA 76

Son of James Maclean Graham and Katharine Graham, Ashfield House, Neston, Cheshire and Ty Coch, Mold. Born: 1883, Claughton, Birkenhead
Shell - Middle V.

Photo of Marmaduke Whitaker Graham
Captain Marmaduke Whitaker Graham
House: No 4, 1894 - 1897. Regiment: West Kent Regt..
Died: 24 July 1915 aged 36 in Iraq. Killed in action in Mesopotamia.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial 11 R 5/6

Son of W. Graham, 2 Temple Gardens, London, E.C. b. 1879.
Shell - Upper V. School Prefect. XI Cricket; House XI Football.
Served in the South African War with 21st Batt. Imperial Yeomanry; Medal with 5 Clasps; Royal West Kent Regt. (from Militia) 1914; Captain 1914; West African Frontier Force 1910.

'Captain Graham was killed in Mesopotamia on July 24th. "Had he lived," writes his Colonel, "he would certainly have been mentioned in despatches. In addition to splendid leading on the day of his death, He had just previously carried out a daring night reconnaissance which was of considerable value to the Force. It was a fine death —killed in the heat of action in a very hot corner." He was a fearless, large-hearted man, who never allowed his abounding humour to veil a serious outlook upon life. ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

He was killed during the capture of Al Nasiriya on the Euphrates.
Wisden on the Great War

Photo of Harold Grant-Dalton
Lieutenant Harold Grant-Dalton
House: No 6, 1903 - 1908. Regiment: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Died: 28 April 1918 aged 28 in Germany. Died in German Hospital.
Cemetery: Niederzwehren Cemetery Hessen Germany 1V H 9

Son of Rev. Colin Grant-Dalton, Wincanton, Somerset. b. 1890.
Middle IV Lower Shell. School Prefect.
Land Agent. Great War, Lieutenant R.N.V.R. 1914. Died of wounds (in German hands) April 28, 1918.
Hood Bn. R.N. Div.

'On leaving School he took up land agent's work, and on the outbreak of war secured a commission with the R.N.V.R., with which force he saw much service at the front. He was reported missing in March 1918, and as having died a prisoner in Germany on April 28th. A cheery, companionable boy at School, who never rose to any high distinction, his subsequent short career showed the manner of man that he was.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous “gallantry and resource”. His citation reads “When all the officers of his company had become casualties he assumed the command and by his bravery and personal example was able successfully to defend an exposed piece of the line. He had on previous occasions done good work” - London Gazette 18 July 1917 page 7230

On 24th March 1918 he sustained gunshot wounds to the pelvis and was found by German troops and was taken prisoner of war and admitted to the German War Hospital at Ohrdruf south of Gotha, Germany. He died at 10 p.m. on 28th April 1918.
Detailed biography at Wincanton Roll of Honour

Photo of Archibald Ronald Grant-Suttie
Lieutenant Archibald Ronald Grant-Suttie
House: No 5, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery.
Died: 23 July 1917 aged 21 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Cemetery: Dozinghem Mil 1 G 20

Son of Robert and the Hon. Mrs. Grant-Suttie (nee Dawnay), Balgone, North Berwick. b. 1896.
Modern II -Army I. School Prefect. XXII Football. Cadet Officer.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.H.A. 1915.
"L" Bty. 15th Bde. Royal Horse Artillery

'Archibald took a good place at Woolwich and qualified for the R.E., but elected to follow his brother in the gunners, and was gazetted in 1915 to a battery of the R.H.A then in Gallipoli, where he went in command of a draft. After the evacuation be went to Egypt, and then to France, where he took part in the Somme battles. He died on July 23rd, from shell wounds received the same day, and leaves a splendid reputation for good work well done. His commanding officer writes: "Beloved by all, he was the most utterly fearless fellow I ever met." Those who knew him at School can understand this.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).
Invisionzone

Photo of Richard Evelyn Griffiths
Sapper Richard Evelyn Griffiths
House: No 7, 1901 - 1907. Regiment: New Zealand Inf..
Died: 08 August 1915 aged 27 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Philosophe British Cemetery Mazingarbe 1V N 9

Son of Dr. Griffiths, 5 Kensington Square, W. b. 1888.
Upper IV - Remove.
Trinity College, Cambridge;
Tea Planter in Ceylon; subsequent1y in New Zealand.
Great War, Private N.Z. Infantry 1914.

'He came to No. 7 at the age of 13, and remained nearly six years. Without earning any very great distinction, either in work or games, he was popular with everybody. He became a House Prefect, gained his XL Cap in Cricket, and was a keen member of the Corps. After leaving Cambridge he proceeded to New Zealand, where he was doing well. Directly war broke out he enlisted in the New Zealand Contingent, and was sent in April last to Egypt, and thence to Gallipoli, where he was one of the first to land. At the end of August he was reported missing with 300 others. The Turks, for some months, refused to give the names of their prisoners. When, however, they did so, his name was not in the list. He always preserved a keen affection for his old School, which he frequently expressed in his letters home.' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

Photo of Hubert Taylor Grindley
2nd Lieut Hubert Taylor Grindley
House: No 1, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 19 October 1915 aged 19 in Belgium. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Battle of Hohenzollern Redoubt. Cemetery: Brandhoek Military Cemetery I E 28

Born: Aug 4th 1896, Congleton. Son of William Henry Grindley (manufacturer), Parkfields, Tittensor, Stoke-on-Trent. b. 1896.
Modern III - Army I.
Heywood Prize 1913,14. School Prefect. Shooting VIII; House XI Cricket and Football.
R.M.A. Woolwich (6th Place) ; R.E. 1915.

'The keynote of Herbert Grindley's character was thoroughness, whether in work or play he never spared himself, and could not understand those who were content to give their second best. As head of the Army Side, as a member of the Shooting Eight, or as a Prefect, his one ambition was to do his best. He was shot through the head whilst making a new trench, and died before reaching the dressing station; a proof of his men's attachment to him is found in the fact that four sappers actually carried him back across the open ground, braving the fire of the enemy rather than lose time by taking him through the trenches. He was killed in France, on October 19th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record: WO 339/4953

Photo of George Edward Grundy
Lieutenant George Edward Grundy
House: Sch, 1892 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt..
Died: 22 July 1915 aged 32 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 35/37

Born Feb 26th 1893. Second son of the Rev. William Grundy, Headmaster of Malvern College 1885-1891, and Margaret Grundy, School House, Abingdon. 1 brother (William), 3 sisters (Margaret, Mary & Flora).
Junior School - VI. Latin Verse; English Verse. School Pre fect. XI Cricket; House XI Football.
Heath H arrison Exhibitioner, Brasenose College, Oxford; Second Class Mods. ; B.A. (Fourth Class Lit. Hum.) 1906; played Golf v Cambridge 1904—06 (captain); Assistant Master Pocklington School 1906-07; H aileybury College 1908; House Master 1913; 2n Lieutenant Cadet Corps.
Great War, Lieutenant 9th Batt. Warwickshire Regt.

'George Grundy gave to Haileybury the best that was in him. The Master of Haileybury College writes of him: " We miss and shall miss Grundy more than I can say. He was an enthusiastic scholar; a keen player of all games ; a Housemaster, and an Officer of O.T.C. But, more than all this, his gallant spirit, his wit, and his unfailing cheerfulness are what we shall always remember." On the outbreak of war he was gazetted Lieut, 9th (Service) Bn. R. Warwickshire Regt. His regiment was sent last June to the Dardanelles; in his short experience of active service his influence with his men is illustrated by the following extract from a censored letter: "I don't think I could go on, if it were not for our officer Mr. Grundy: he does everything for us, and we would do anything for him." He was killed on July 22, while encouraging his men to advance against some troublesome snipers. One who knew him all his life writes of him: "George Grundy inspired affection in no common degree. In his boyhood he had the gift of disarming the sternest and most justly irritated Masters. Out of school, and in later years, his wholesome and happy disposition, his wide sympathy, and perhaps, above all, his quaint humour, and sudden irresistible laugh, won him hosts of friends, who feel now that something radiant and vivifying has passed from their lives." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:
He left for the Dardanelles in June 1915 and was killed in action in the front trenches at Gallipoli. Col. Palmer, who was killed two days later and buried beside him wrote : “He was one of my best officers. He was always thinking of the welfare of his men and was much loved by his comrades, who could not fail to appreciate his unselfish devotion to their interests.” Major Gordon, who succeeded Col. Palmer in command of the regt., wrote: “ Mr. Grundy was a splendid officer, energetic, capable, cheerful and brave.” His Influence with his men is illustrated by the following extract from a letter: “He does everything for us and we would do anything for him.” A brother officer concludes his letter : “Let it be some consolation that his end was worthy of his life and that he left behind him an example that we should like to follow.” The Master of Haileybury College wrote of him: “He was a keen scholar; he was a fine athlete; but what we loved him for was the boyish laugh, the unfailing cheeriness, the constant goodness of his heart. He had that real charm of personality which is given to but few men ; but it is perhaps the best of God’s good gifts. I cannot put my feelings better than in the words one wrote to me : ‘ All the sunshine seems to have gone out with Grundy's death’ “

Service record: WO 339/12837

Photo of Cyril Stuart Guest
2nd Lieut Cyril Stuart Guest
House: No 8, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 04 August 1916 aged 22 in Greece. Accidentally killed at Salonika.
Cemetery: Karasouli Military Cemetery D 820

Son of Edward H. and Florence C. S. Guest, The Lindens, West Bromwich. b. 1894.
Upper IV B - Matriculation Class. House XI Football.
Articled to a Chartered Accountant.
Great War, Private, S. Staffordshire Regt. 1914; 2nd Lieutenant 10th Batt.

'To those who remember Cyril Guest's robust figure and high spirits, the news of his early death, and the sad circumstances under which it occurred, came as a great shock. He was engaged on night duty on August 4th, and had occasion to go back to headquarters. Returning alone, he tripped while crossing the barbed wire, and his revolver, which he was carrying in his hand, went off and he was shot. His Captain writes: "He had not been with us long, but he had gained the liking and respect of officers and men alike. He was invariably cheerful, considerate of the comfort of his men, and energetic." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

He was killed whilst out on patrol near Hill 420 on the Doiran Front, Salonika. He had become detached from his men and was found on the wire shot through the heart.
Details of campaign and his death at kaiserscross

Photo of Arthur Leslie Gwynne-Jones
2nd Lieut Arthur Leslie Gwynne-Jones
House: No 2, 1912 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 04 May 1918 aged 21 in Belgium. Accidentally killed in action due to a fire.
Cemetery: Brandhoek New Military No. 3 111 B 37

252nd Siege Bty. Royal Garrison Artillery
Son of Annie Elizabeth and the late Lt. Col. J. A. Jones, of Ty Dyfrig, Llandaff, nr. Cardiff

'Leslie Gwynne Jones passed through the R.M.A., and received his commission in November 1916. He had been out at the front for fifteen months, and had seen some very heavy fighting, when the news came that he had been killed. He was at an observation post at the top of a building which was being shelled by the enemy, when the lower part was set on fire. Thinking that he could not get through the flames, he apparently tried to escape by the outside of the building and fell to the ground. He lived only a few minutes after the fall, and never regained consciousness. The Major commanding his battery said, in a letter to his father : "He will be missed most frightfully in the battery, where he was loved by officers and men. Your son had done splendidly ever since he joined the battery, and especially in these last few weeks under most trying conditions. His record of military service, short as it was, is evidence enough that the country has lost a loyal and gallant officer who would have' gone far in his profession. The promise of the future was foreshadowed by the capability he showed as Head of the House at a critical period in its history. All the Prefects having left at the end of the summer of 1914, he was brought to the front in somewhat exceptional circumstances, but from the first he fully justified the trust placed in him. His forceful personality - combined with tact, enthusiasm, and sound judgment—won everyone's regard, and his influence, which is still felt in the House, was always for good. He set a fine example of keenness and loyalty, and in a great measure moulded the character of a young and impressionable House. Though a little reserved at times, he had a wide circle of friends, and his loss is deeply mourned by all who knew the sterling worth of his character. He was a cricketer of no mean order, being a forceful batsman with many good strokes, and a safe field. In 1915 he was one of the best bats in the XI., and had a brilliant future. He took a great interest in all games, an interest that was wholly unselfish, and so was an inspiration to others to play the game in a right spirit.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

He was killed as a result of a fire caused by a tin of petrol (thought to be water) being accidentally knocked over and catching fire on an open brazier at about 1pm on the 4th May 1918. He was on observation duty in the north western tower at Vlamertinghe Chateau, two stories above the fire. He got out the window and tried to climb down the wire lightning conductor with another man but it broke and they both fell from a height of 75 feet.

Service record including full details of fire: WO 339/80565

Photo of Malcolm Wilfred Forester Hall
Lieutenant Malcolm Wilfred Forester Hall
House: No 3, 1902 - 1905. Regiment: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
Died: 19 May 1917 aged 29 in France. Killed in action at Monchy-le-Preux.
Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 6

Born 20th Feb 1888. Son of Frances Adair-Hall, of 115, Cheriton Rd., Folkestone, and the late Col. Henry Adair-Hall of East View, Monkstown, co. Dublin.
Middle IV B—Modern II.
In business in Waterford.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 1914. 5th Bn. attd. 1st Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
Killed in action at Monchy-le-Preux, May 19, 1917.

'He received a commission in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in September, 1914. He took part in the landing at Suvla Bay on August 15th, 1916, was severely wounded and invalided home. After a period of light duty he went out to France, when he took part in many of the great battles. He was reported wounded and Missing at Monchy-le-Preux (May 19th, 1917), and is now presumed to have been killed on that date. At the outbreak of war he was engaged in business in Waterford, where he enjoyed universal popularity.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

On 15th August 1915, at Gallipoli, he received a gun shot wound to the left foot and subsequently caught scarlet fever.

Service record: WO 339/25435

Photo of Arthur Perceval Hamilton
Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Perceval Hamilton MC
House: No 1, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: Royal West Surrey Regt..
Died: 15 September 1916 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at High Wood.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Flatiron Copse Mametz V11 1.2

Son of the late Maj. P. F. P. Hamilton, R.A., and Mrs. Hamilton, Brendon, Winchester, b. 1884.
Army IV—II.
Royal West Surrey Regt. (from Militia) 1904 ; Lieutenant 1910.
Great War, Lieut.-Colonel 19th London Regt. Killed in action at High Wood, September 15, 1916 ; M.C., Despatches (2).

Husband of Kate Gibson Hamilton, of 42, Eaton Square, London (married on 2nd April 1914 at Christ Church, Mayfair)

'Arthur Percy Hamilton joined No. 1 in September 1898, being placed in the Army Side. He was an attractive boy of a quiet modest nature. His health was unfortunately not strong, and on this account he left school before he was able to attain any high position. His character when with us gave indications of the spirit which was afterwards to lead to distinction in the Army. He was killed in action on September 15th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Service record: WO 339/6053

Photo of Eric Stanley Milthorp Harding
Lieutenant Eric Stanley Milthorp Harding
House: No 3, 1907 - 1909. Regiment: Liverpool Regt..
Died: 05 July 1917 aged 25 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Cite Bonjean Armentieres V111 B 29

2nd/5th Bn. The King's (Liverpool Regiment)
Son of William and Edith A. Harding, of Hope Lodge, Oxton, Birkenhead.

'In his two years here Eric Harding showed the qualities that make a boy universally liked and respected. He did everything keenly, quietly, cheerfully; he had sound common-sense ; and there was that natural modesty about him which makes the most lovable of friends. On leaving School he became articled to a Chartered Accountant; his keenness for athletics never flagged; he undertook the Secretarial duties of the Birkenhead Cricket Club and was an active member of the Liverpool Ramblers Football Club. When war broke out, he enlisted at once in the King's Liverpool Regiment, in which he got a commission in September 1915. He went out to the western front in February of this year and on the night of July 5th, while on patrol duty, he was hit in the leg by a bullet: he continued to fight on and kept his men under splendid control, until he was hit again, this time mortally.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Liverpool Daily Post:
The death in action is announced of Lieutenant Eric S. M. Harding of the King's (Liverpool) Regiment. He was 25 years of age, and the second son of the late Mr. William Harding and of Mrs. Harding, 21, Templemore-road, Oxton. Lieutenant Harding was educated at Malvern College, and when the war broke out was preparing for the final examination to become a chartered accountant. He joined the ranks as a private in 1914, and obtained a commission in the following year, subsequently putting in some good work at Oswestry Camp as a bomb instructor. He had been on the Western front for some time, and on 5th inst., while on patrol duty, a large body of the enemy tried to surround the patrol. Although shot in the leg, Lieut. Harding kept his men well in hand, but he was hit again, and died while being carried back to the trenches. Lieutenant Harding was well-known in athletic circles. He was secretary of the Birkenhead Cricket Club, and was regarded as one of their best bowlers. He was also a promising member of the Ramblers' Football Club.
Livesofthefirstworldwar

Photo of Wallace George Hardman
2nd Lieut Wallace George Hardman
House: Sch, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Manchester Regt..
Died: 09 January 1917 aged 20 in Iraq. Killed in action near Kut.
Cemetery: Amara War Cemetery XX1 D 11

Born: March 12th 1897 at 37 Spring Street, Oldham. Son of Mrs. Wilhemina I. Hardman, of Grove View, Delph, near Oldham and 15, Charlbury Rd., Oxford, and the late James Hardman, M.A. 2 brothers (James and Andrew), 1 sister (Catherine).
Went to Manchester University: 1914, Student, Textile Industries; Officer Training Corps, October 1914 to March 1915. Gazetted 26 March 1915 [LG 26 March 1915, page 2993]; 13th Battalion Manchester Regiment; 2nd Lieutenant; Mesopotamia.

'Wallace Hardman came to Malvern from Mr. Lynam's School like many other excellent fellows and, though he was never a very prominent boy, his manliness and common-sense made him respected and liked, and he bade fair to turn out a very sound and useful man.
His commanding officer, wrote: "Your son was shot through the head and died instantaneously while gallantly leading his men in an attack on the morning of January 9th. His conduct during the attack in its earlier stages was so gallant that I intend to mention his name particularly when the next despatches are sent in, as, in conjunction with several others, he succeeded in saving what at one time looked like a very dangerous situation."' (Malvernian, Mar & Apr 1917).

Embarked Bombay: 7-8-16
Disembarked at Busra: 12-8-16
Dragon School
Service record:WO 339/37962

Photo of Herbert Hastings Harington
Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Hastings Harington
House: No 5, 1881 - 1886. Regiment: 84th Punjabis (I.A.).
Died: 08 March 1916 aged 48 in Iraq. Killed in action in Mesopotamia.
Battle: Siege of Kut. Cemetery: Basra Memorial PANEL 48

Son of H. B. Harington. 22 Mornington Avenue, W. Kensington. b. 1868.
III—Modern I. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; House XI Football.
Welsh Regt. (from Militia) 1888; I.S.C. 1890; Major 92nd Punjabis 1906.
Great War, Lieut.-Colonel 62nd Punjabis (attached); killed in action in the Persian Gulf, March 8, 1916; Despatches. F.Z.S.
An authority on the Birds of Burma and author of works on Ornithology 'Anas poecilorhycnha haringtoni' named after him.

'Lieut.-Col. Harrington's associations with his old School were, owing to his having spent the whole of his soldiering life in India, few and far between. He paid, however, two visits latterly, one in 1908 and again in 1914, when he brought his wife to see the School. Those who had known him at School in the early eighties found in him after more than twenty years exactly the same quiet, modest, keen disposition they had known in his School days. He was not prominent as an athlete, but took his part in all School games and interests, and was a general favourite. His death on the field of honour will enshrine his memory among those who knew and loved him.—H.F. He was killed in Mesopotamia on March 8th, 1916. (Malvernian, Apr 1916).
Wikipedia

Photo of Peter Yarborough Harkness
Captain Peter Yarborough Harkness
House: No 7, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: West Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 32 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial PIER/FACE 2A, 2C and 2D

Son of Rev. H. L. Harkness, Hove, Brighton. b. 1884.
Shell—Lower V. House XI Cricket.
Captain 4th West Yorkshire Regt. (Special Reserve) 1908.
Great War, mobilised914
2nd Bn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own)

The Times: "Captain Harkness held a commission in the West Yorkshire Regiment at the outbreak of the war, and saw active service in the earlier engagements. He was injured at Neuve Chapelle owing to a fall from his horse, and was invalided home. He had only recently re-joined his regiment when he fell in action on July 1st."
His Colonel writes : " He was in command of the two leading companies, and led them with great coolness right up to the enemy's trenches when he was killed by a shell. To him and his fine example during the battle is greatly due the splendid reputation the Battalion gained in this action." (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Photo of John Anthony Harris
Captain John Anthony Harris MC
House: No 5, 1904 - 1908. Regiment: Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 26 November 1917 aged 27 in France. Killed in action at Bourlon Wood.
Battle: Battle of Cambrai. Cemetery: Cambrai Memorial, Louverval P 5

Born Aug 24th 1890. Son of Mrs. J. Harris, of 3, Leven St., Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Yorks, and the late Col. J. Harris, V. D.
Upper IV B—Modern I. Chance Prize. XXII Football.
In business.
12th Bn. Yorkshire Regiment

'Jack Harris left School young, to go into business, but remained a faithful Malvernian, and enlivened many winter gatherings in the House with his inimitable whistling and general good spirits. He was the only son of a widowed mother and single-handed in his business, but he felt called to join up in 1915, and was commissioned March 16th, 1915, Captain, May 1916, in the Yorkshire Pioneers. After spending some time at Cannock Chase Camp, he went to France June 1916 and received the Military Cross for excellent work during the year, especially when in command of a company, always getting the best out of his men. He was reported "Missing" November 26th, 1917, when he was out with two R.E. officers looking over very important ground at Bourlon Wood. They were surprised and fired on by the enemy. The others reached a sunken road, but Captain Harris was never seen again. It is presumed that he was killed and buried by the Germans. One of the R.E. officers crept out to look for him and was instantly killed, and the search parties could find nothing. His men loved him, and say they would follow him anywhere. He was splendid in danger.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Captain J.A. Harris was in Z Coy. On Nov 20th 1917 he went out reconnoitring for defensive work in front of Bourlon Wood with Major Johnson V.C. of the Royal Engineers and Major Clarke R.E. They were caught by a party of the enemy and fired on. Major Johnson was shot in the throat, Major Clarke escaped and reported the affair saying Major Johnson and Capt Harris were dead.

Service record: WO 339/25087

Photo of Bernard Sydney Harvey
Captain Bernard Sydney Harvey
House: No 3, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: London Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 28 in France. Killed at Gommecourt.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial PIER/FACE 9D

Son of Walter Sydney and Florence Harvey, of 9, Vale Court, Maida Vale, London and 24 Westbourne Terrace Road, W. b. 1888.
Lower V—VI. School Prefect. Ledbury Cap ; XI Football; House XI Cricket.
Trinity College, Oxford ; Third Class Class. Mods. 1909 ; B.A. 1910;
Assistant Master at St. Andrew's School, Eastbourne.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 1st/5th Bn. London Regiment (London Rifle Brigade). 1914, Captain.

'An earnestness of purpose, crowned with an attractive personality, endeared Bernard Harvey to all who knew him. He set a fine example of loyalty to school and house, and he never spared himself to make others share his true enjoyment of life. At Oxford he figured prominently on the river, and interested himself deeply in the Trinity College Mission. He chose school-mastering as his profession, and returned to his former school, St. Andrew's, Eastbourne. At the outbreak of war he applied for and received a commission in the 5th Battalion of the London Regiment. He was wounded in May, 1915. Early this year he was promoted to be Captain. He was killed in action on July 1st. His General writes: "One of my men says he was with Captain Harvey when he was hit in the shoulder, but he still continued to lead his men and cheer them on. He was wounded again, and in the evening when conducting the retirement he and others had to get through some wire; in doing so a noise was made that attracted the attention of the enemy, and the end came at once."' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Photo of Francis Leslie Hastings-Medhurst
2nd Lieut Francis Leslie Hastings-Medhurst
House: No 6, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 17 October 1914 aged 19 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of La Bassee. Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P 1718

2nd Bn. Worcestershire Regiment
Son of Mrs. Hastings-Medhurst, of Easton Cottage, Chagford, Devon.

'He went to France, 28 Aug. 1914, and was killed in action at Illies, near La Bassée, 17 Oct. 1914. On this occasion the Worcesters had suffered severely, and he had volunteered to go for re inforcements. He was almost in safety when he was killed by a maxim gun, but fortunately the forces coming up saw him and were in time to succour the few left alive. He had been wounded in the head three days previously, but refused to go into hospital, owing to shortage of officers. He was buried by his men the same night, 700 yards north-west of Illies Church.
His Colonel wrote to his widowed mother that he was a most promising officer, loved by all his men, and a real loss to his regiment; and another officer wrote: “We all loved him, and his men were very fond of him and would go anywhere with him. He was always so cheerful and extremely cool in action. As an officer remarked to me, ‘an awfully nice fellow, a most promising soldier and one we can ill afford to lose.’”(De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour)

'He won a Prize Cadetship at Sandhurst in June 1913. In August of this year he was gazetted to the 2nd Worcestershire Regt., and had only been on active service in France for a month when he was killed in action on Oct. 17th. Possessed of more than average ability, those who knew him predicted a successful career in the Army, and it is more than sad that such promise has been cut short. He was a boy of happy, cheery disposition, and he leaves behind him many friends at Malvern who deeply regret his early death. ' (Malvernian, Nov 1914)

Photo of Charles Nicholls Hathorn
2nd Lieut Charles Nicholls Hathorn
House: No 6, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: North Lancashire Regt..
Died: 10 August 1915 aged 21 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 152-154

6th Bn. The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
Son of Kenneth Howard Hathorn (Judge, Supreme Court, S. Africa), of 175, Loop St., Pietermaritzburg, Natal.

'Charles Hathorn the brother of W. B., was a South African by birth and a cousin of A. W. H. Scott, who was killed early in the War. He joined up early and received a Commission in the Loyal N. Lancashire Regt. He was soon sent out to Gallipoli, and was declared "missing" in August 1915, being last seen surrounded along with other comrades by a large number of Turks and engaged in hand-to-hand fighting. He was not presumed killed until August of this year. He won no prominence either in School or on the play grounds, but he was one of the best swimmers in the School. He was a cheery generous character, and universally popular.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Photo of John Campbell Haverfield
Lieutenant John Campbell Haverfield
House: No 4, 1903 - 1905. Regiment: 24th Punjabis (I.A.).
Died: 14 July 1915 aged 28 in Iraq. Died of wounds in the Persian Gulf.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial V L 1

Son of the Hon. Mrs. Haverfield, of 46, Cornwall Gardens, South Kensington, London.
attd. 24th Punjabis.

'John Haverfield was the son of the late Major Henry Haverfield, R.H.A., and the Hon, Mrs. Haverfield, who is at present in charge of a Scottish Women's Hospital in Serbia. He passed from Sandhurst into the Indian Army (27th Cavalry) in 1908, and exchanged to the West Yorkshire Regiment in 1912. In 1913 he retired from the Army to take up business in India. On the outbreak of the war he offered himself for service, and was attached to the 24th Punjabis. He died on July 14th, in the Persian Gulf, of wounds received in action.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

Photo of Cyril Francis Hawley
Captain Cyril Francis Hawley
House: No 5, 1892 - 1894. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 02 November 1914 aged 36 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 51/53

2nd Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps
Son of Sir Henry Hawley, 5th Bart., and Lady Hawley; husband of Ursula Mary Hawley, of 14, Stafford Place, Buckingham Gate, London, S.W. Served in the South African Campaign.

Photo of Gerald Ralph Hayes-Sadler
Lieutenant Gerald Ralph Hayes-Sadler
House: No 3, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt..
Died: 03 September 1916 aged 20 in France. Killed in action at Ginchy.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Delville Wood Longueval

2nd Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Son of Major R. Hayes-Sadler, of "Cooleen," Farnborough, Hants.

'He will always be remembered here with real affection for his gentle, thoughtful, kindly disposition. He had a calm and quiet manner, and there was nothing shallow in any friendship he made. He reached no prominent position in the School, but a short soldier life brought fully to light his pluck, courage, and determination. He was wounded slightly in April, and re-joined his Battalion in July. He was again wounded in September, but was reluctant to go back when ordered to do so; soon after a shell burst near, killing him. His Captain writes: "We all greatly feel his loss, he was so keen on his work and popular in all ranks; he was of the greatest help, keeping cool under terrific fire, and, had he got through, I should have sent in his name for mention." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Killed in action near Delville Wood.

Photo of Alfred George Hayman
Captain Alfred George Hayman
House: No 8, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 09 September 1916 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at High Wood.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Caterpillar Valley Longueval X11 C 9

"A" Coy. 2nd Bn. Welsh Regiment
Son of Alfred and Ellen Dorothy Hayman, of Great Elm, Frome; husband of Majorie Hayman, of Cromarty, Elmsleigh Rd., Weston-super-Mare.

'After resigning his commission he married, and went to Canada to take up farming He was doing very well there when war broke out, and he joined the Canadian Mounted Rifles and returned to England. Upon his return he re-joined his old Regiment, was made Captain last December, and left for the front (France) early this year. He went through a great deal of very hard fighting, in which he showed conspicuous bravery (as those who knew him here felt sure he would); while his good nature made him very popular both with officers and men. He was wounded early in July, but was soon at the front again, and was killed while leading his Company into the front line on Sept. 9th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

De Ruvigny Roll of Honour:
He was killed in action while leading his company at High Wood. He was awarded the Military Cross "For keeping his men together a whole week in the front line under terrific shell fire. Although wounded the first day, he refused to allow himself to he sent back, and was buried three times. He acted with great gallantry and set his men a splendid example.” The Brigadier-General of the 1st Division wrote "He was certainly one of the best company commanders in the brigade, and had done most excellent work only last month, where his energy and fearlessness were most conspicuously shown. He is a real loss to us,” and his Commanding Officer: “I thought you would like to know how much I valued him, and how highly I thought of his abilities as a soldier.” A brother officer also wrote: "It may be a great consolation to you to know that he was beloved by the officers and men of my battalion. I have known him for the past twelve years. I had the very highest opinion of him.” and another: “I look back on all my friends who have gone, and above all stands one — a little higher, a little nobler, a little finer than all the rest — your husband."

Photo of Richard Browne Heagerty
2nd Lieut Richard Browne Heagerty
House: No 6, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: London Regt..
Died: 03 May 1917 aged 22 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 3

Born April 9th 1895. Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Heagerty, of Leatherhead, and 34 Victoria Street, London.
Lower Shell — Matriculation Class. House Prefect. XXII Cricket; House XI Football.
In business. Clerk at Great Western of Brazil (London office).
Great War, Private H.A.C. 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant London Regt.
1st/2nd Bn. London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers)

'He joined the H.A.C.in Aug. 1914, and went to the front within a month. He was wounded in June of the following year, and soon after obtained his commission in the London regiment. During the next two years he saw a great deal of active service, and was gazetted missing in May 1917. On the evidence of eyewitnesses, he was a month ago officially declared killed in action. Dick Heagerty was a prominent boy in his House, and well known to a wide circle of his contemporaries. He was a steady, independent character, who cared little for outside opinion.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Arrived in France: 18.9.14
16.6.15 - wounded by bullet entering back of shoulder
England:5.8.15 to 9.10.15
9th Jan 1916, complained of varicose veins, and an operation was performed on the 18th Jan 1916.

He was reported as missing on May 3rd 1918, and was later confirmed as being killed by enemy machine gun fire on the morning of May 3rd 1917 at Arras. The witness was Pte Hunn who was under his command and had often played football with him. Pte Hunn was at a German Prisoner of war camp in Hameln from where he made his statement via the Red Cross.

Service record: WO 374/32246

Photo of Robert Francis Hebbert
Captain Robert Francis Hebbert
House: No 3, 1898 - 1900. Regiment: Indian Medical Service.
Died: 19 March 1916 aged 33 in Iraq. Died on active service in Mesopotamia.
Battle: Siege of Kut. Cemetery: Basra Memorial V F 9

Born on March 7th 1883 in India. Son of the late Henry Francis Hebbert, (Indian Civil Service), and Mrs. Hebbert; husband of Maisie Hebbert, of 14, Granville Gardens, Ealing Common, London.

He was educated at St. Thomas's Hospital taking the M.R.C.S. and L.R.C.P. Lond. in 1906.
He entered the army as lieutenant on September 1st, 1906, and was promoted to captain on October 4th 1909.
Medical Officer of the 107th Pioneers, died in Mesopotamia of relapsing fever on March 19th, aged 33.
(British Medical Journal 1 April 1916)

'R. F. Hebbert will be best remembered by the masters and his contemporaries as a boy with a pleasant charm of manner and quiet earnest disposition. His taste turned to a medical profession, and he left rather early before he had attained as high a position in the School as his character and ability would have raised him. He died on active service in Mesopotamia.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).
Kings College London Memorial

Photo of Abraham Rhodes Hebblethwaite
2nd Lieut Abraham Rhodes Hebblethwaite
House: No 9, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 03 October 1915 aged 21 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial 11 H 28

Born May 19th 1894. Son of Rhodes and Louie Hebblethwaite, of Highthorne, Husthwaite, Yorks.
Passed matriculation exam for King's College, Cambridge
88th Bty. Royal Field Artillery
Address: St Helen's, Fulford Rd, Scarborough

'At the outbreak of war he enlisted in the 18th Hussars, and subsequently obtained a commission in the Artillery. He was killed by a high explosive shell in France on the 3rd of October. His Colonel wrote of him that he "had the makings of an excellent officer; he was very keen and energetic, liked by his brother officers and his men, and I feel that the Brigade of the R.F.A. have lost an excellent officer." He was somewhat delicate when he came to Malvern, but soon outgrew that, and played a prominent part in every phase of school life Quiet and reserved in manner, thoroughly reliable in every way, he exercised an influence which was wholly good.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Service record: WO 339/18899

Photo of William Herbert Hedges
Captain William Herbert Hedges MC
House: No 5, 1907 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 21 August 1916 aged 23 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery Saulty 111 A 12

1st (North Midland) Field Coy. Royal Engineers
Son of William Ross Hedges and E. Hedges, of 117, Anderton Park Rd., Moseley, Birmingham.

'Soon after the outbreak of war he went to the front with a commission in the 1st North Midland Field Co. He was present at the second battle for Ypres. In March 1915 at Hill 60 he was shot whilst going across the open to take aid to a wounded man of his company. On recovering from his wounds, he was sent to Egypt with the rank of Captain. On his return he did much arduous and dangerous work in the fighting round Arras. For one particularly dangerous and successful piece of engineering, carried out entirely by his own skill and coolness, he was personally congratulated by the General of the Division. In June this year he was awarded the Military Cross. On August 18th he was wounded for the second time. He had gone some distance back from the firing line when the enemy began a haphazard shelling, during which he was severely wounded. After an operation he went on, very well, and it was fully expected that his fine physique would pull him through, but amputation became necessary. He survived the operation for one day. No braver or more popular officer has laid down his life in this war than Captain Hedges. His loss was keenly felt in his regiment. His General, writing to his father, says: "Personally he is a great loss to me as an officer and as a friend. He was brave, energetic, capable, and reliable, and had a magnetic influence over his men. He was marked out for distinction. You must have been proud of such a son, and it will be some small consolation to you to know how nobly he has lived and died, and how greatly he was respected and loved by the men and by all of us." Another officer writes: "Your son was brave, generous, and kind-hearted. His men would have done anything for him, or followed him anywhere. From the General downwards, we all loved him." These and many other letters show in what affectionate regard he was held by all ranks, and such a tribute of affection will not surprise his Malvern friends who admired him for his quiet strength of character, as well as for his physical courage. He will perhaps be remembered at Malvern chiefly for his enthusiasm for boxing. He represented the School in the Light Weights at Aldershot, and in the School competitions he won the Light Weight in 1910 and the Heavy Weight in 1911. After leaving School he was successful in various competitions. In 1913 he was Midland Counties Heavy Weight Champion, and again in 1914.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

On 6th April 1915, the Birmingham Gazette reported that he had been shot through both legs by a rifle bullet while attempting to rescue one of his
wounded men in front of the trenches as a result of fierce fighting at Zillebeke near Ypres.
During his time in hospital he wrote to the editor of the Sporting Buff saying:
' The left leg is healing up well and the muscles and nerves, which were mostly severed, are joined up again, as I can move my right foot several inches already. It is rather a slow business, though. I had also frost bite in my right foot, through having to lie in a ‘Jack Johnson’ hole (shell crater) for nearly six hours before we could be got away. No stretcher party could have lived there by daylight, of course, and the hole was about one third full of water, in which my feet were submerged. It was really a most uncomfortable way of spending a Sunday afternoon.’

He was severely wounded on the 18th August, and was taken to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station based at Warlincourt where he died three days later.
Detailed biography at Moseley-Society

Photo of Sidney Hannaford Hellyer
2nd Lieut Sidney Hannaford Hellyer
House: No 5, 1904 - 1906. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 08 May 1915 aged 26 in United Kingdom. Died of wounds at Boulogne.
Cemetery: St Mary's Brixham SE corner

Son of Charles and Jane Elizabeth Hellver, of "Wolborough," Brixham. Born at Hull
4th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment.

He was a partner in the firm of Hellyer's Steam Fishing Company, Hull. He joined the Territorial Force at the outbreak of the war, and received his commission in the 4th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment (T.F.) in September.

Extracts from letter published in De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour:
As soon as I arrived back our battn. Went into action in the open (not in trenches) against a section of the enemy who were occupying a village on a ridge and who were backed by excellent artillery — by this time I was tired. The 4th East Yorks went into action at about 4 o’clock on that afternoon (Saturday, 24 April, 1915) for the first time in the history of the battn., and a bloody battle it was.

We advanced in artillery formation across half a mile of open country and under a very heavy bombardment both of shrapnel and high explosive shells, and many men fell - fell absolutely heroically, there is no other word for it. I would never have believed that hardened men would have marched on under that bombardment, and these men,
already very tired and two nights sleepless, having carried a load weighing (60-70 lbs. since we left Newcastle, and hardly having their boots off since that time, saw battle for the first time as if they were just going to the barber's for a shave.

Three times within 20 minutes a shell struck the ground near the men I have the honour to lead, once within 10 yards, and when the high explosive shells strike
they dive into the earth and the end of the world seems to come. They blow a hole just about the size of the pond at the back field at Lamwath, and the
contents of the hole are blown right up into the skies, much higher than a trawler’s mast, so high that one has to lie on one's face what seems like 20 seconds
until all the earth and fragments have fallen. When one strikes near as that one is covered with earth, so that there is a little difficulty in rising under the
weight of it. The noise deafens and slightly stuns one.

One shell blew us down in a body without killing one of us. This bombardment went on incessantly, not a shell now and then, but all the time shells bursting, sometimes two or three coming near the same spot at once. After the third time we were covered with earth, and a man of mine shouted to me: ‘If these B---s don’t ring the bell
soon we’ll go and give them their money back’. After advancing 20 minutes thus the high explosive shells ceased, and we went into the zone of the rifle and
machine-gun fire, still in daylight and over open fallow land. They never worried a bit, never faltered, never oven laid down to the shrapnel a moment longer
than was essential; when they heard the shriek of a coming shell just walked determinedly on into the jaws of it. Col. Shaw was shot dead at about this stage. My Capt., B. Farrel, was shot through the heart a minute or two after.
Major Thielmann met instant death, and the man who went to help him was shot as he rose to do it. When we had advanced in rushes sufficiently near to
the village, bayonets were fixed, and the Germans went back from the village without waiting for the assault. It was then dusk. We collected our men,
gathered up and carried back what poor fellows we could, and marched the remainder back to some trenches about 500 yards in rear, leaving the position to be occupied by other troops, who dug themselves in. We laid down in some shallow trenches in a wood in the rain that night too tired to eat…

At 11 p.m. (Sunday night - 25th April) we were ordered to come out of the trenches and march back to a rest camp five miles in rear, and a terrible march it was. The road was swept with shrapnel for three of the miles. The villages which in times of peace had been on it were mere broken skeletons of their former selves. Many of the
houses were in flames. The road had great shell holes In it, which parties of men were filling in with the broken houses in order to make it passable for
transport, which crossed it at the gallop. Capt. Morrill, at about this stage, I think, got three shrapnel holes in one leg. Dead horses, broken wagons, mules, and
occasionally men, strewed the road throughout its length, and the smell of them was sickening. The men at this stage were so tired that every time we got into
the ditches for a rest we had difficulty in waking them to move on again, even in the roar of the shell bursts; many were being helped along by their pals.

At 1am this morning (Monday, 26 April) we arrived at this camp for our well-earned rest. We walked into our huts, put our heads on our packs, and fell asleep with the roar of the battle still going on, and our artillery, part of which has a position near here, roaring away for all it was worth. I woke 10 hours after-wards stiff and hungry, and with a thirst I haven’t yet succeeded in quenching, in spite of the eight pint-mugs of tea I have drunk at intervals to-day.”

Two days later, on 28 April, his platoon had orders to entrench west of Gedde's detachment, between the canal and the Filkem road. He was encouraging his men to dig themselves into the ground when a shell fell in their midst, killing four outright and wounding eight, including 2nd Lieut. Hellyer, who died in consequence of his wounds at No. 7 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne.

The Times, May 15th :—
" A Sergeant in A Company of the 4th East Yorkshire Regiment, writing to a friend at Hull, gives the following description of how Lieutenant Hellyer received the wounds from which he died: 'Just as we reached our new position and were digging ourselves in, a shrapnel shell burst right in the middle of our company, killing four of us outright and wounding eight, including Mr. Sydney, who had his arm blown off, the other arm broke in two places, and several other wounds in other parts of his body. But, wounded as he was, he would not let anyone touch him until all the others had been attended to. I have never met a braver man in my life, and our platoon owe their lives to him, time and time again, by the way he handled them.' "

Photo of Henry May Henderson
Lieutenant Colonel Henry May Henderson
House: No 5, 1893 - 1895. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 10 March 1917 aged 38 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Aveluy Communal Extension M 1

Son of Capt. J. H. Henderson, R.N., and Mrs. J. H. Henderson, of Red House, Tenby, Pembrokeshire.
18th Div. Royal Engineers

The Times: 'Lieutenant- Colonel Henderson K.E. obtained his commission in January, 1899, and served with the 12th Field Company in South Africa from February, 1901, to February, 1906, receiving the Queen's Medal with Five Clasps. In 1906-7 he was in the 11th Field Company, when Sir John French in the Aldershot command orders highly commended "the works reports of six officers (R.E.) during the winter training season." Lieutenant Henderson, as he then was, being one of the six. In January, 1908, he was promoted to Captain, and was afterwards in command of that Company until 1909, when he joined the Ordnance Survey, returning to Headquarters at Chatham in 1913. On the declaration of war he went to France with the 56th Field Company, taking part in all the fighting up to September 15th, when he was wounded during the struggle on the Aisne and sent home. On his recovery he was appointed to the Royal Military Academy as Chief Instructor in Military Engineering—a General Staff appointment—and retained that appointment until he was sent to the Front again in March, 1916, as Major in command of a Field Company. He was slightly wounded on July 9th. He was appointed temporary Lieutenant-Colonel last January, and appointed Commanding R.E. of a division. He was mentioned in despatches on January 4th. He fell in action on March 10th.'

Photo of Malcolm Arnold Hepburn
2nd Lieut Malcolm Arnold Hepburn
House: No 7, 1905 - 1910. Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders.
Died: 30 November 1914 aged 22 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Berks Cemetery Extension 111 D 8

Born Hampstead, London, 8 Jan. 189. Son of W. A. Hepburn, 13 Well Walk, Hampstead, N.W. b. 1892.
Heddon Court Preparatory school, Hampstead,
Malvern: Upper V—VI. Lygon Scholar. Lea Smith Reading Prize. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; XL Football.
Exhibitioner, Magdalene College, Cambridge ; Fellow Commoner 1912.
In business.
Gazetted 2nd Lieut. Special Reserve 29 Jan. 1913, subsequently being appointed to the 2nd Battn. Seaforth Highlanders; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, and was killed in action near Messines 30 Nov. 1914. Buried In Ploegsteert Wood.

'Malcolm Hepburn was, to those who knew him well, a singularly attractive character. His disposition was so cheery and optimistic that it made him a splendid companion, while his keen and almost child-like enjoyment of life did not prevent him from showing a discriminating and sound judgment in serious matters. His ability won him success at Cambridge, which he left at the end of his first year to accept an opening in business.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914).

'He obtained a Classical Exhibition at Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he rowed in the College Lent boat in 1911 ; was in the College Tennis VI ; and won his colours for Association football. He joined the Reserve of Officers in the spring of 1913, and did his special training with the 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, to which he was afterwards gazetted, and with which he was serving in France when killed. He was shot while superintending sapping operations in trenches near Messines on the 30th November, 1914, and was buried in Ploegsteert Wood.'Magdalene College Cambridge

Service record: WO 339/9167

Photo of Jacob Andrew Norman Hessler
Captain Jacob Andrew Norman Hessler
House: Sch, 1907 - 1907. Regiment: Durham Light Inf..
Died: 27 May 1918 aged 25 in France. Killed in action near Rheims.
Cemetery: Soissons Mem

Son of Jacob Kruse Muller Hessler and Killy Hessler, of "Wyndcliffe", Seaton Carew, West Hartlepool. His brother Jacob K.M. Hessler also died serving with the D.L.I.
5th Bn. Durham Light Infantry

'Since leaving School he had been engaged in his father's shipping and timber business. He was in the West Indies at the outbreak of war, but immediately returned to take his place in the Territorial battalion to which he had been commissioned a year previously, and he went with it to France in 1915.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

He sought to alleviate the financial hardships of widows, that entailed his men making weekly voluntary contributions to the Company Sick Club, which would provide widows with financial support until they received a government grant, which elicited the approval of the Secretary of State for War and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.They Served

On 16th May 1916 at Kemmel, he sprained his ankle while jumping an obstacle on returning from the firing line. He returned to his unit on the 15th October 1917.

Service record: WO 374/33011

Photo of Arthur Leslie Hicks
Lieutenant Arthur Leslie Hicks
House: No 9, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 04 April 1918 aged 34 in France. Died of wounds as prisoner at Auberchicourt.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Cabaret Rouge Brit Cemetery Souchez XX E 15

11th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment
Son of Arthur and Constance Laura Hicks, of 113, Finchley Rd., Hampstead, London.

'His many School friends will remember him as a boy of an exceptionally happy and cheerful disposition, apparently without a care. Only those who knew him intimately realized that there was another and serious side to his character. It was there all the time, and those who served with him in the Army saw that side, and valued it. He died of wounds, as a prisoner of war, in a German field hospital.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Service record: WO 339/54191

Photo of Robert Aubrey Hildyard
2nd Lieut Robert Aubrey Hildyard
House: No 6, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 20 December 1916 aged 19 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Peronne Road Cemetery, Maricourt 111 B 22

1st Bn. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)
Son of Maj. H. R. and Mrs. Hildyard, of Hythe, Kent.

'He was a boy of very decided character, full of cheeriness and fun, and a great authority on School form and custom. None will forget his courage, either moral or physical; his excitement at the outbreak of war to join up at once; or his chagrin when told that his age and size were against him. He was a fine character, whose gallant death all his contemporaries will mourn. He entered Sandhurst soon after leaving School, and was gazetted to the Royal Lancaster Regt. last April, proceeding to the front in July. He was killed on Dec. 20th, two days after re-joining his regiment from leave.' (Malvernian, Mar 1917).

He was gazetted 2nd Lieut, 6 April, 1916; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from the following July: was Battalion Signalling Officer, and was killed in action the day after returning from leave, 20 Dec. 1916, during the opera tions on the Somme. Buried In the French Officers' Cemetery at Maricourt.(De Ruvigny)
Memorial stained glass window at St Leonard's Church, Hythe

Service record: WO 339/59410

Photo of Arthur Moberly Hill
2nd Lieut Arthur Moberly Hill
House: Sch, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: Somerset Light Inf..
Died: 09 April 1917 aged 22 in France. Killed in action at Arras.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 1

North Somerset Yeomanry attd. 1st Bn. Somerset Light Infantry
Son of William and Katharine Hill, of "Sunnycroft", Tamworth, Staffs.

Service record:
WO 374/33349

Photo of Beresford Winnington Hill
2nd Lieut Beresford Winnington Hill
House: No 6, 1905 - 1911. Regiment: 59 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 04 March 1917 aged 25 in France. Killed in action near Monchy-au-Bois.
Cemetery: Berles New Military 1 A 7

59th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and General List.
Son of Thomas and Florence Herbert Hill, of East View, Uxbridge, Middx. Born at Ewell, Surrey.
Scholar of Magdalene College, Cambridge.
Gazetted to 10th Bn. The Rifle Brigade Aug., 1914. Previously wounded Oct., 1915. Joined R.F.C. in 1916.

'Beresford Hill gained no distinction at games, but no boy at Malvern, in his day, was better known or more highly respected. He owed his position to his scholarly taste, his genial buoyant temperament, and the obvious uprightness and honesty of his character. Few boys have exercised a wider, certainly none a more wholesome, influence over their fellows, and it is safe to say that no one came into contact with him that was not the better for it. Let us give him the highest praise at our command, and say that he was one of the finest type of Public School boys. Nothing can be added to that praise.' (Malvernian, Apr 1917).

In 1892 he was educated at Mr. Worsley's, Evelyns, Hillingdon, and at Malvern College, where he held a classical scholarship.
On leaving Malvern he was given a leaving scholarship, and he also won an open classical scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and went up in October, 1911, taking his degree in 1914. He served in the Cambridge O.T.C. for three years, and on the outbreak of war was given a commission in the Rifle Brigade. He went to the front in July, 1915, and was wounded in October, 1915. On his recovery he entered the Royal Flying Corps in April, 1916, and returned to the front as a pilot in February 1917.
He was killed in aerial action near Arras on 4 March, while fighting against four hostile aeroplanes, which attacked him as he was returning from photographing the German lines in his plane RE8 (A4163) when he was shot down and killed by Leutnant Renatus Theiller from Jasta 5.
Air War Flight

Service record: WO 339/12838

Photo of Herbert Philip Hilton
Captain Herbert Philip Hilton
House: No 1, 1887 - 1890. Regiment: Middlesex Regt..
Died: 16 February 1915 aged 42 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 49-51

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hilton; husband of Hylda Swan (formerly Hilton), of 7, Elysium Row, Calcutta, India.
Roberts’ Horse; Middlesex Regt. 1900; Captain 1906; South African War 1899-02, Despatches, Queen’s Medal with 6 Clasps, King’s Medal with 2 Clasps.
3rd Bn. Middlesex Regiment

'He received his commission in the Middlesex Regiment in 1900 from the ranks of Roberts' Horse, after a campaign of much distinction in South Africa. , He took part in the relief of Kimberley, and was present at the operations at Paardeberg, Dreifontein, and Vet River, and was in actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill in the Transvaal, and Lindley, Bethlehem, and Wittebergen in the Orange River Colony.' (Malvernian, March 1915).

He entered the front-line on 10 February 1915, and was killed in action less than a week later, on 16 February 1915, during fighting to recapture some lost trenches.

Menin Gate North: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman

Photo of Frederick Leonard Hingston
Captain Frederick Leonard Hingston
House: No 4, 1892 - 1895. Regiment: Duke of Cornwall's Light Inf..
Died: 26 April 1915 aged 38 in Belgium. Killed in action near Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Poperinghe Old Cemetery 11 P 27

Born 6th June, 1877 at Leicester. Son of E. Hingston, of "St. Oswald's", Selwyn Rd., Eastbourne.
Lower IV—Shell B. House XI Cricket.
Duke of Cornwall’s L.I. (from Militia) 1809; Captain 1909;
served with Mounted Infantry South African War 1900-01, Despatches.
Queen’s Medal with 6 Clasps.
1st Bn. Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

'Those who were at school with Leonard Hingston will remember him as a boy of generous heart and cheery disposition, qualities which gained him many friends in later life. ' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

He was educated at Llandaff Cathedral School and Malvern College. He joined the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry from the Militia in October, 1899, and took part in the South African War, in which he was employed with the Mounted Infantry, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State from February to May, 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet, and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June, again, from July to November, 1900; and a third time from November, 1900, to October, 1901, including actions near Johannesburg, at Pretoria, Diamond Hill, and Belfast. He was mentioned in Despatches ("London Gazette," 10th September, 1901); and received the Queen's medal with six clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in May, 1901, and Captain in February 1909; and in December, 1911, was appointed Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. He held this appointment until March, 1915, when he rejoined the 1st Battalion, which formed part of the Vth Division.

Captain Hingston was well-known in Switzerland as a remarkably fine skier. In the winter of 1913-14 he won the British Ski-ing Association Cup at Wengen. He was also adept at ice-hockey, winning many trophies, and a keen lawn tennis player and golfer.

Writing after his death, a General Officer said: "I wanted, as Brigadier General Commanding the brigade, to tell you how very deeply and sincerely I sympathise with you in the heavy blow that has fallen upon you. Your husband belonged to a great regiment, which has given consistently splendid service throughout the campaign, and, if I may say so, he was one of the finest officers of a fine regiment. I had often spoken to your husband on the occasion of my frequent visits to the trenches, and had always been much struck by his earnestness and thoroughness and by the keen interest which he took in all matters relating to his company and his men. To them I know his loss is a severe one, as it is indeed to all of us."

Captain Hingston married, in November 1911, Essy, youngest daughter of the late Colonel William Charles Plant, Indian Army, and left no family.
De Ruvigny & Bond of Sacrifice

Photo of Francis Noel Wells Hitchings
Lieutenant Francis Noel Wells Hitchings
House: No 2, 1892 - 1895. Regiment: Royal West Kent Regt..
Died: 03 December 1918 aged 41 in France. Accidentally killed at Auberchicourt.
Cemetery: Auberchicourt British Cemetery 1 C 16

Son of J R. N. Hitchings, Shalford, Guildford. b. 1877.
Modem II—I.
Author.
Great War. Private Inns of Court O.T.C.; 2nd Lieutenant 5th Bn. The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) attd. 6th Bn. The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). Accidentally killed near Douai, December 3, 1918.

'Frank Hitchings was a boy whose career at School was not marked by any notable incident. He reached quite a high place in the School in work, and could always be relied on to do his best, whatever it was that he undertook. Physically he was not very strong, and by reason of this he never was able to do much in the way of games. In spite of a weak constitution, he was determined to take his part in the war as far as he could, and he did much more in active service than those who knew him at School could have thought possible. He joined an O.T.C. in January 1915, and received a commission in the 5th Battalion of the Queen's Regt in May 1915. He went to France in June 1917. He was invalided home in October 1917, and was with the 2/4th Queen's at Tunbridge Wells till last October, when he went to France again, and was attached to the 6th Royal West Kent Regt. From information received, it is clear that he was esteemed and loved by his brother officers and his men.' (Malvernian, Feb 1919).

Inscription at ST MARY THE VIRGIN CHURCH, Shalford, Guilford:
LIEUT FRANCIS NOEL WELLS HITCHINGS 4TH RESERVE BN. THE QUEENS ROYAL WEST SURREY REGT/ KILLED BY THE EXPLOSION OF A SHELL WHILE CARRYING OUT SALVAGE WORK AT AUBERCHICOURT, FRANCE DEC 3RD 1918

Photo of Evelyn Melville Shovel Hoare
2nd Lieut Evelyn Melville Shovel Hoare
House: Sch, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 28 March 1918 aged 29 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 16

Son of H. E. Hoare, Bix, Henley-on-Thames, b. 1889.
Lower Shell—Middle V.
Farmer in British East Africa.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant King's African Rifles ; invalided ; Private A.S.C. ; 2nd Lieutenant 6th Bn. The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

'He was in East Africa when the war broke out. After getting a commission and serving there, he was invalided out, came home in 1916, and, after several rejections on account of health, obtained a commission in the Buffs, and went to the front on December 30th of last year. He was killed in action March 27th. Evelyn Hoare never made much mark at School, but showed some determination and independence. He had a strong sense of humour, and was a pleasant companion, but took an unusually long time to grow out of childhood. After he left, he developed rapidly.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Service record: WO 339/83359

Photo of Geoffrey Brian Hobbs
Lieutenant Geoffrey Brian Hobbs
House: No 2, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 05 September 1915 aged 19 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying near Dover.
Cemetery: St Margarets At Cliffe, Kent

9th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and Northumberland Fusiliers
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hobbs, of Riding Mill, Northumberland. His brother, Lieut. H.E. Hobbs, also fell.

'After leaving School he went into business, but on the outbreak of war he volunteered for service and was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the 10th Northumberland Fusiliers in Sept. 1914, and was, later, promoted Lieutenant. On May 25th, 1915 (the very day on which his elder brother was killed in action in Flanders) he joined the Royal Flying Corps, and was granted his pilot's certificate on June 26th, and on Aug. 26th he passed his final examinations. He was killed on Sept. 7th at Martin Mill, near Dover, whilst he was engaged in practice flights. He had shown great skill in the management of machines of various types. The accident which caused his death was due to the machine getting out of control. He was buried with military honours at St. Margaret's Bay on Sept 9th. He had considerable ability, and his career at School, where he displayed much activity of mind and body, gave promise of success later on. His bright and cheery disposition gained for him many friends.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Dover Express - Friday 10 September 1915:
MILITARY AVIATOR KILLED AT DOVER.
The first military fatal flying accident at Dover occurred early Tuesday morning, when we regret to report that Lieut. Geoffrey Brian Hobbs, of the Royal Flying Corps, aged 19 years, met his death owing to his machine falling to the ground at Martin Mill from a great height.

His age was 19 years. He had flown for a total of from 45 to 50 hours, and had had experience of many sorts of machines. At about a quarter to six on Tuesday morning the deceased ascended in a Martinside biplane for a flight. This machine was new him, but it was in good order and had been flown the evening before by two different pilots. His time for flying would be about half an hour. At the end of that time a telephone message arrived from the waterworks at Martin saying that the machine had fallen to the ground heavily. Witness ordered the break-down tender and a hospital orderly to go at once. Witness went with the tender, and in a field to the east of the waterworks he found the machine which had been used by the deceased smashed on the ground, with the engine in the ground and the back doubled up as if it had come down head first. The deceased was pinned beneath the machine. The machine was lifted, and the deceased was cut clear. He was dead. The deceased was removed on a stretcher and taken on the tender to the Duke of York's Hospital.

Raymond Champion said that he was the engineer in charge of the Martin Waterworks. A few minutes to six o'clock the previous morning he was in the yard, and he was watching a flying machine. It was flying very high —at least 3,000 feet — and was going straight along, when it suddenly shot round two or three times, and then turned over several times and fell to the ground. Witness heard the machine strike the ground, and he sent the message to the last witness, and then went to the place where the machine had fallen.

Another officer of the Royal Flying Corps said that he gave the deceased instructions to fly on Tuesday morning and what he was to do. The machine was in good order, and had only been in use four and a half hours. It was sent out the night before for the purpose of seeing if it was all right, and it was reported by the instructor that all was right.

Lieut. Hugh Roker Evans, R.A.M.C., stationed at the Duke of York's School, said that the body was brought to the Hospital a little before seven o'clock on Tuesday morning. He examined the body, and found that death had quite recently taken place. There was a very extensive fracture of the vault of the skull, exposing the brain. The left leg was broken — both bones. Death was caused by the fracture of the skull. The fall would be quite consistent with the injuries.
Sussex history forum

Photo of Herbert Edward Hobbs
2nd Lieut Herbert Edward Hobbs
House: No 2, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 25 May 1915 aged 21 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 8-12

2nd Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers
Son of Herbert Hobbs, of Riding Mill, Northumberland.

He was a fine long distance runner, and won the mile race for his College while at Oxford.

'At the outbreak of the war he had just completed his first year at Keble College, Oxford; he intended after his University career to be ordained. He was one of the first to be given a temporary commission in August 1914, and was sent for one month to the Officers' Training Camp at Churn, after which he was appointed to the 8th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. After several months training he was promoted Lieutenant and went to the Staff College at Camberley, subsequently being gazetted to a permanent commission in the Regular Army, 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. He went out to the front with a draft to his regiment on May 2nd, and was killed in action nr. Hooge on May 25th.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

Menin Gate South: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman

Photo of Victor Maitland Hobday
Captain Victor Maitland Hobday
House: No 2, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: West Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 07 July 1917 aged 23 in Belgium. Killed in action at Messines.
Cemetery: Railway Dugouts Burial Ground

11th Bn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own)
Son of Col. E. A. P. Hobday, C.M.G. (Royal Artillery), and Mrs. N. Hobday (nee Pottinger).

Architect in Victoria and Duncan, British Columbia where he also played cricket.

'He left School rather young, to go out to British Columbia, and the career which he had entered upon at School was interrupted just at the time when he was giving promise of prominence and usefulness. He had a special aptitude for games, and considerable intellectual power. After he had finished his education in British Columbia, he began work as an architect. He had much success in various forms of athletics, and was well known in the province. When war broke out he joined the first Canadian force that was raised, and came over to England in October 1914 with the first Canadian Contingent. When the new battalions of the West Yorkshire Regiment were formed, he was gazetted to one of these, and was thus one of the original officers, and he remained with this battalion till the time of his death. He saw much service in France, and gained rapid promotion. He was killed on June 7th. 1917 when gallantly leading his men. His bravery and fine leadership had been conspicuous all the time that he was on active service. He was mentioned in despatches in Jan. 1917. The fine work he did in the action, in which he lost his life, was typical of his career as a man and a soldier.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).
Wisden

Service record: WO 339/4691
Unit war diary: WO 95/2184/4

Photo of Robert Charles Hodson
Lieutenant Robert Charles Hodson
House: No 1, 1901 - 1905. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 08 May 1917 aged 29 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Nine Elms Mil Cemetery Thelus

279th Railway Coy. Royal Engineers
Son of Charles William Hodson. C.S.I. and Maria Hodson.

'On leaving School he studied engineering at King's College and in 1910 secured an appointment on the East Indian Railway. Here he did excellent work, especially in connection with flood difficulties, and received commendation. In April 1916 he joined the R.E. (Railway Troops) and was killed on May 8, 1917, while constructing a big gun position. His School record of good steady work has been well maintained in his subsequent career; when the call came, he threw up a good post and placed his skill at the disposal of his country.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

'He left in his Will a sum of £2,000 to King's College "For the improvement of the Engineering Dept." '
Kings College London

Photo of Edward Ralph Lambert Hollins
Captain Edward Ralph Lambert Hollins
House: Sch, 1898 - 1903. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 03 March 1916 aged 32 in Belgium. Died of wounds at Ypres.
Cemetery: Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery 11 A 42

Son of Frederick and Bertha Hollins, of The Grange, Eastbourne.
Middle IV—Upper V. House Scholar. House Prefect.
Emmanuel College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1906 ;
Schoolmaster.
8th Bn. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)

'During the four years preceding the war he had been helping his father at The Grange, Eastbourne. In Sept. 1914 he joined the 9th King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt.) and passed through the Staff College, Camberley, in May 1915- In the autumn of that year he was ordered to the western front, and was subsequently invalided home with enteritis. At the end of December he was attached to the 10th Battalion of his regiment at home, and in February 1916 was sent to Flanders, where he joined the 8th Battalion. He was wounded on March 2, and died on the following day. All he did both at work or play was done with keen enthusiasm and an entire unselfishness; he died as he had lived, "cheery and thinking of others to the last."' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

He was well known in the Sussex Cricket club.
Wisden

Photo of Alexis Cowper Honey
2nd Lieut Alexis Cowper Honey
House: No 2, 1913 - 1917. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 10 February 1918 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Etaples Military Cemetery XXV111 E 9

4th Bn. Worcestershire Regiment
Son of Mrs. A. L. Honey, of Cowper's House & Houghton, Huntingdon, Hunts, and the late Rev. Albert Alexis Honey. Native of Huntingdon.
Middle V—Lower VI. Senior Chapel Prefect. XI Cricket ; XI Football; Ledbury Cap. Cadet Officer.

'A. C. Honey only left School last April for a course at an Officers' Cadet Unit at Firbright, after which he obtained a commission in the Worcesters, and went to the front. He was wounded on November 30, a bullet passing through his left arm, lacerating the lung and breaking a rib. After ten weeks of patient suffering, he died on February 10. As Alec Honey belonged to the generation of most of the present members of the School, his loss will be keenly felt. His shyness and reserve restricted his circle of intimate friends, but those who knew him best entertained a strong affection for him, and respected him for the seriousness of purpose and unfaltering sense of justice and duty which he showed in every action. Not a few of his contemporaries owed more than they knew to his wholesome influence. He was modest to a fault, and could never see any merit in his own performance, though he was a natural and proficient games player. His remarkable achievement in his first summer term marked him out as a cricketer of great promise, for in one of the Junior House matches he made 176 not out in the first innings, and followed it up in the second innings with 268. He gave every promise of a successful career at Oxford, where he had already entered at Brasenose College. He was not destined to outlive by many months his school career, but even in the short period of his military service he amply fulfilled the expectations of those who knew and loved him most.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

He was wounded at Cambrai on the 30th November 1917 and died of wounds on the 10th February 1918 at No. 20 General Hospital, Camiers, France.
Biography at Worcestershire Regiment

Photo of James Garland Hopkinson
Captain James Garland Hopkinson
House: Sch, 1890 - 1893. Regiment: Gordon Highlanders.
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 40 in Belgium. Killed in action at Hooge.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 38

Son of J. Hopkinson, 36 Netherhall Gardens Hampstead. B. 1875.
Lower IV— Upper V. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football 1892,93; House XI Cricket.
Farmed for some time in Aberdeenshire; North of Scotland Bank, Elgin; Factor Drumtochty Estates; Lieutenant 6th Batt. Seaforth Highlander
Great War: Lieutenant 4th Batt. Gordon Highlanders 1914; Captain. Killed in action at Hooge, September 25, 1915.

'He joined the Gordon Highlanders from the Reserve of Officers having served formerly with the 6th Seaforth Highlanders. On September 25, 1915, he was in command of a double company, and had the honour of being selected to lead the attack. He had reached the third line of the German trenches, and was standing beside a captured gun when he was shot through the head by a sniper. We have had the privilege of reading many letters written by his fellow-officers and men, which testify alike to his universal popularity and his sterling qualities as a soldier. One quotation, however, will suffice: "He was one of the bravest men I ever fought beside, and his daring and courage, combined with his cool and collected behaviour during this very difficult operation, could not be excelled by the very bravest. His first thought was always for the pleasure and comfort of the men under him; and he was dearly loved by all." This is high praise; but his contemporaries who remember the boy on the football field and as Head of his House will recognise the man.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Service record: WO 374/34653
Transcript of unit war diary

Photo of Wilfrid Palmer Horsley
Captain Wilfrid Palmer Horsley
House: Sch, 1901 - 1905. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 02 July 1917 aged 30 in France. Killed in action at Bailleul.
Cemetery: Bailleul Communal Extension 111 D 165

Son of J. H. Horsley, Keyston Manor, Huntingdon, b, 1887.
Middle IV B—Modern II. House Prefect.
Formerly Sheep-grazer in New Zealand and Cattle Rancher in the Argentine; Farmer in England.
Great War (overseas), Captain East Yorkshire Regt. ; Flying Officer 53rd Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and General List.
Killed in action July 2, 1917 ; M.C.

'He was a quiet steady boy who won his way to authority in the House and showed promise of developing into a valuable man. On leaving School he went out to New Zealand and later proceeded to the Argentine. When war broke out he was farming in England. He joined up at once and received a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment. He went out to France in command of Trench Mortar Batteries. He had lately transferred to the Royal Flying Corps.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Below is an extract from a very detailed biography written by his great nephew Joe Horsley and kindly provided by Simon Hooper via email:
He served first with the East Yorkshire Regiment in Egypt, and then in France where he commanded his Brigade Trench Mortar Battery in the Battle of the Somme where he was awarded the Military Cross.
In the autumn of 1916 he joined the Royal Flying Corps, and returned to France in June 1917 and was killed a month later on the 2nd July 1917.
His Commanding Officer wrote:-
“He was escorting six planes on photographic duty, over enemy lines in Flanders when attacked: after seeing his escort into safety, he turned and attacked three German planes, when he was shot down, falling in “No Man’s Land”. His Observer was unconscious for three days but is recovering.”

His aircraft was a Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8 (serial no A3249).

There is a memorial at St John the Baptist, Keyston, Huntingdon.IWM
RAF museum story vault

Photo of Norman Elliot Howell
Major Norman Elliot Howell
House: Sch, 1896 - 1899. Regiment: 82nd Punjabis (I.A.).
Died: 07 January 1916 aged 34 in Iraq. Killed in action at Sheikh Saad.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 48/66

Son of Leonard Sidgwick Howell, Brentwood, Canterbury, N.Z. b. 1882.
Upper IV—Middle V.
Served with Royal Lancaster Militia in the South African War 1899-1900, Queen's Medal with Clasp ; Bedfordshire Regt. 1901 ; Indian Army (82nd Punjabis) 1903 ; Captain 1909 ; Staff College, Quetta, 1914.
Great War, D.A.A.G. Killed in action at Sheikh Saad (Mesopotamia), January 7, 1916; Despatches.
Husband of Mabel Howell, of 83, Ladbroke Grove, London.
82nd Punjabis attd. (Staff Capt.) 35th Infantry Bde.
Mentioned in Despatches.

'He joined the Militia (3rd Royal Lancaster) in January 1900, and served in the South African War; Queen's Medal with clasp. In May 1901, he was gazetted to the Bedfordshire Regiment, and in August 1903, joined the Indian Army (82nd Punjabis). He served as Adjutant from 1907-11, was promoted Captain in 1909, and qualified for the English Staff College in 1913. He passed for the Indian Staff College in 1914. He became Staff Captain at Allahabad in November 1914, and D.A.A.G. in February 1915. He left India on active service in November 1915, and was killed on the night of January 7th, while searching for two wounded officers. His name appeared in the list of Mentioned in Despatches issued on October 20th. Norman Howell was a delicate-looking little boy when he came to Malvern, but he had pluck and grit, and his subsequent career proves that he was made of the right stuff. His character was most attractive, and if he had not left early to fight in the Boer War he would doubtless have made more of a mark at School. His service record shows what a good soldier he was.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Memorial at St Mary and St Rhadegunde church, Whitwell, Isle Of Wight

Photo of John Fraser Hoyland
Captain John Fraser Hoyland
House: No 1, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died: 01 October 1916 aged 21 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 3C/3D

Son of Clement Edward Hoyland, Stock Park, Ulverston, and Brinkworth Hall, Elvington, York. b. 1895.
Middle IV B—Science I I . House Prefect. Shooting VIII 1913,14.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 4th Bn. Attd. 9th Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers 1914.
Killed in action October, 1916.

'A sound, reliable boy in every way, an excellent leader and a good shot, Hoyland was a splendid type of the "First Hundred Thousand." He secured a commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers, and was reported wounded and Missing in October 1916, and is now assumed to have been killed.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

Killed in action at Mouquet Farm Thiepval.
Clock memorial at St Peter's Church, Finsthwaite, Cumbria.

Husband of Louisa Eddie (formerly Fraser).

Service record: WO 339/29979

Photo of Charles Geoffrey Hume
Lieutenant Charles Geoffrey Hume
House: No 5, 1905 - 1907. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 26 October 1914 aged 24 in Belgium. Killed in action at Ypres.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 35/37

Son of Edward Hume (Barrister-at-Law) and Agnes Mary Hume, Church House, Oatlands, Weybridge. B. 5th July 1890.
Army III—II.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; South Staffordshire Regt. 1910 ; Lieutenant 1913.
Great War, killed in action at Ypres, October 26, 1914.

"B" Coy. 1st Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment

He was fond of polo and sailing.
At the time of his death his battalion formed part of the VIIth Division, and as he senior officers had been killed he was leading his company.

Menin Gate North: In Memory and In Mourning By Paul Chapman
IWM

Photo of Richard Grain Humphreys
Lieutenant Richard Grain Humphreys
House: No 1, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 28 September 1917 aged 20 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial

Son of Sir Travers and Lady Humphreys, of 47, Castlebar Rd., Ealing, Middlesex, and 6 Montpelier Road, Ealing, W. b. 1897.
Upper Shell—Matriculation Class. House Prefect.
London Matriculation.
Great War, Private Inns of Court O.T.C. ; 2nd Lieutenant K.R.R.C.
13th Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps

'Having passed London Matriculation, 1st Class, he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., and obtained his commission in November 1915. Early in this year he was invalided home, and underwent an operation for appendicitis, returning to the front in July last. On 28th September he was acting as Intelligence Officer, and about 5 a.m. received a slight wound on the head. This having been dressed, he was sent with two attendants to the Aid Post, but during the short journey a shell burst a few yards from the party, killing three of them, including "Dick" Humphreys, instantaneously. His Captain writes: "It has been an awful shock to us all, for he was intensely admired for his magnificent courage and utter disregard of danger. He was just fearless. He was extraordinarily efficient in the discharge of his duties, and his loss will be most keenly felt. He was also very keen on the promotion of sport in the Battalion, and was a great sticker for looking after the comfort of his men, both in and out of the trenches." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Service record: WO 339/47531

Photo of George Ward Hunt
Captain George Ward Hunt
House: No 5, 1896 - 1900. Regiment: Northamptonshire Regt..
Died: 09 May 1915 aged 34 in Belgium. Killed in action at Auber Ridge.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ploegsteert Memorial P 7

Son of George Eden Hunt and Mrs. Eden Hunt, of 144, Coleherne Court, South Kensington, London and Wadenhoe, Northants. B. December 10, 1881.
Modern IV—Lower Modern I. XL Football; Ledbury Cap.
Northamptonshire Regt. (from Militia) 1903; Captain 1912 ; served with 3rd Batt. In South African War 1902, Queen's Medal and 2 Clasps.

On 16th Sept 1914 he was badly wounded in the back at the Battle of Aisne, during the afternoon, by a shell splinter, and sent home. "During this day [Aisne, 16 Sep 1914] we had still another severe loss amongst the officers, as poor "Mother" Hunt (Captain Ward Hunt) was badly wounded in the back during the afternoon by a shell splinter. One of the very best, I had known him intimately for several years with the 2nd Battalion when I was attached to it in 1910, and at the Depot when he was doing duty there. One of the world's most cheery souls, with a heart of gold, "Mother" was popular wherever he went." (2Lt EJ Needham's account).

On 25 Feb 1915 he returned to France, and on 9th May led an attack against German trenches at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, and although badly wounded he carried on and was killed. "The poor old boy went out again to the 58th in 1915 and was killed at Aubers Ridge on the fatal 9th May. A very great little gentleman and a really good friend." (2Lt EJ Needham's account). In The Battle of Aubers Ridge, 9th May 1915, the 2/Northants were in the Northern Pincer movement, and had 426 casualties that day, of which 12 were officers. More than 11,000 British casualties were sustained on 9 May 1915, the vast majority within yards of their own front-line trench.
Detailed biography

Photo of Edward Kenneth Gordon Huntly
Captain Edward Kenneth Gordon Huntly
House: No 5, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: Ox & Bucks Light Inf..
Died: 20 September 1917 aged 23 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Poelcapelle British Cemetery XL1V F 2

Son of Gordon Merriman Huntly and Mary Adelina Huntly, of Grahamstown, South Africa, and Highclere, Victoria, S. Rhodesia, b. 1894.
Upper IV B—Lower Modern II.
In business in South Africa.
Great War, Private South African Forces 1914; Captain Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry attd Rifle Brigade.

'He left School at 16 to begin life in South Africa, and on the outbreak of war joined Prince Alfred's Guards, Cape Peninsular Garrison, and became Marine Gun Instructor. 'When the Corps was disbanded, he returned to England and received his commission in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, December 1915. He went to France in September 1916, and was invalided home, through an accident, in December 1916. He returned to France August 1917, had command of his Company, and was killed in action on September 20th, 1917. His Colonel writes: "He died at the head of his men in battle—a true soldier's death.”
He was one of those who never forgot Malvern in his distant home, but wrote constantly for news of the School, which he was never to see again.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).


Service record: WO 339/50959

Photo of Michael Edward Charles Hussey
Lieutenant Michael Edward Charles Hussey
House: No 3, 1901 - 1906. Regiment: Indian Army.
Died: 04 September 1915 aged 28 in Pakistan. Died at Lahore.
Cemetery: Karachi War Mem14-18

Son of J. F. Hussey, Quatre Bras, Dorchester, b. 1887.
Lower IV—Lower Shell.
Rubber Planter.
Great War, Lieutenant I.A.R.O.; invalided 1915. 81st Pioneers.

Photo of Hanley Hutchinson
Lieutenant Hanley Hutchinson
House: No 7, 1906 - 1908. Regiment: West Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 01 September 1917 aged 27 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Grevillers British V11 B 14

Son of William Hanley Hutchinson and Elizabeth Clare Hutchinson, The Meads, Ripon. b. 1890.
Upper Shell—Matriculation Class.
Solicitor 1913.
Great War, Lieutenant 2nd/5th Bn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) 1914 (overseas).

Harrogate Herald:
The announcement of Lieutenant Hutchinson's death has been received with very great regret in Ripon, where he was very highly esteemed by all who knew him, and his sad death has cut short an exceedingly promising career. Lieutenant Hutchinson was educated at Kent House School, Eastbourne, and at Malvern College, where he remained until he passed his preliminary examination for the law. He served his articles with his father until the last six months, when he went to the firm of Messrs Crossman, Pritchard and Co., of London, where he finished his articles. He passed his final examination and was admitted as a solicitor on the 13th October 1913. He practised in Ripon until the end of September 1914, when he joined the West Yorkshires, his commission being dated September 30th, 1914. He completed a thorough training in England with his regiment, and was appointed machine gun officer. He was a good officer, a smart soldier, and greatly esteemed by all ranks. He first went on active service at the beginning of January this year, returning home for ten days' leave in July last. He returned again to the Front on the 1st August. Prior to the war Lieutenant Hutchinson was deeply interested in the Church Lads' Brigade, and held the rank of lieutenant in the Ripon Cathedral branch.

Lieutenant Allan T Hodgson, in a letter to the bereaved parents, says : "Dear Mr Hutchinson, It is with great sorrow that I have to write to tell you of the death of your son in action on the morning of the 22nd November whilst gallantly leading his men to repel an enemy counter-attack near Bourlon Wood. He led his men splendidly throughout the great attack of the 20th and 22nd November. He has proved himself a gallant young officer, and I am proud to have had him under my command. Both his fellow officers and men join with me in most sincere sympathy for you and your family in your bereavement.

There is a marble memorial tablet to him at Ripon Cathedral.
Harrogate People newspaper articles
Memorial Tablet

Massacre on the Marne: The Life and Death of the 2/5th Battalion West …By Fraser Skirrow

Photo of John Barnabas Hutton
Lieutenant John Barnabas Hutton
House: No 9, 1905 - 1908. Regiment: South Staffordshire Regt..
Died: 13 October 1915 aged 24 in France. Killed in action at Hohenzollern Redoubt.
Cemetery: Loos Memorial P 73/76

Son of A. W. Hutton (Manager for John Russell & Co and works manager for Cyclops), Wayside, Streetly, Sutton Coldfield. b. 1891.
Upper IV B—Science Form.
Birmingham University ; B.Sc. 1912.
Engineer (John Russell & Co., Ltd.).
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 5th Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment.

He was employed with John Russell & Co., Ltd.. as Assistant Engineer, during which time he showed exceptional ability, both technically and in the handling of men: volunteered on the outbreak of war: was gazetted 2nd Lieut. 5th South Staffordshire Regt. 26 Aug. 1914, and promoted Lieut. May, 1915; went to France In March. 1915 and was killed in action during an attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt 13 Oct. following.

His Colonel wrote: “He was one of the most promising officers in the battalion, and his name would shortly have been sent forward for promotion to Captain. If there was any responsible work which required careful attention, I could always depend upon his doing it thoroughly, and I had the greatest confidence in him. His quiet modest demeanour was an additional claim on the regard which we all had for him, and I can assure you that all his surviving comrades feel his death as a keen personal
loss. Of all the subalterns I lost on 13 October, your son was the one I could spare least. Universally popular, full of promise, and with a quiet reserve of strength, he will long live in our memories.”
(De Ruvigny)
Memorial at St. Matthew's Church, Church Hill, Walsall:
IN MEMORY OF/ JOHN BARNABAS HUTTON/ LIEUT. 5TH BATT. SOUTH STAFFS. REGT./ TERRITORIAL FORCE/ KILLED IN THE ATTACK ON/ THE HOHENZOLLERN REDOUBT IN FRANCE/ OCT 13TH 1915. AGED 24./ A TRIBUTE OF HIGH ESTEEM FROM/ THE STAFF AND WORKMEN AT/ THE CYCLOPS AND NEW SIDE IRONWORKS/ "Greater love hath no man than this that/ a man lay down his life for his friends."

Memorial

Photo of Robert Edward Hyslop
Sergeant Robert Edward Hyslop
House: No 6, 1904 - 1906. Regiment: Suffolk Regt..
Died: 21 November 1916 aged 27 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Varennes 1 G 37

Born 19 Feb 1889. Son of Robert Hyslop, Glenholm, West Walk, Leicester.
Lower Shell—Middle V. House XI Football.
In business.
Husband of M. Hyslop, of "Elthwaite," Morris St., Sheringham, Norfolk.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant W. Surrey Regt. 1914, invalided; Private, afterwards Sergeant 2nd Bn. Suffolk Regiment
Died of wounds November 21, 1916.

'He will be remembered at School as a rather delicate, nervous boy, who played extremely well at full back in his winning House Eleven. Always a keen Volunteer and Territorial soldier, he was given a commission in the West Surrey Regt, at the outbreak of war, but was obliged to relinquish it owing to a breakdown in health. It seemed likely that he would not again be able to serve his country, but his health improved and he joined the Suffolk Regt. as a Private and rose to Sergeant. He had been recommended for a commission just before he died of wounds on November 21st in hospital abroad. He leaves a widow and two sons.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

He was wounded on the attack on Serre and 'he died of self-administered opium poisoning while being transferred from the battlefield to hospital on 21 November 1916'.Detailed biography at Oadby remembers

Photo of Edwin Charles Irish
2nd Lieut Edwin Charles Irish
House: No 7, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: East Lancashire Regt..
Died: 26 December 1917 aged 19 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P 77-79 163A

Son of E. C. Irish, 26 Daleham Gardens, Hampstead, N.W. and of Alice Christina Irish of 8A, Winchester Rd., Swiss Cottage, London b. 1898.
Army III—I. House Prefect. House XI Football. Gymnasium Colours.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 2nd Bn. East Lancashire Regt. 1917.

'Irish had always intended to make the Army his profession, but, like so many others, left School earlier than was intended and went to Sandhurst, whence he entered the East Lancs. Regiment. He was a boy of robust character, and showed signs of developing into a fine man. His early death will be mourned by all who knew him at School, where his happy disposition made him a general favourite. His keenness for the Army at an early age was extraordinary, and it is sad to think that his career has been cut short so soon in a profession in which he had hoped to make his mark.' (Malvernian, Mar 1918).

Service record: WO 339/78240
Unit war diary: WO 95/1729/2

Photo of William Henry Irvine
2nd Lieut William Henry Irvine
House: No 6, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Flying Corps.
Died: 25 October 1916 aged 19 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying in England.
Cemetery: St Brides Major Glamorgan

Son of H. O. Irvine, Southerndown House, Bridgend and of Mary M. Irvine, of 2, Salisbury Avenue, Penarth, Glamorgan, b. 1897.
Lower V—Lower VI. House Prefect.
London Matriculation.
Great War, Private Royal Fusiliers; 2nd Lieutenant R.F.C.

After leaving school he matriculated at London University, after which he was employed at a munition factory. He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers in May, and got his commission in the Royal Flying Corps in July, and received his “wings” on September 28th. He was accidentally killed while flying in England.
Obituary in Flight Global magazine

Photo of John Eric Jackson Jackson-Barstow
Lieutenant John Eric Jackson Jackson-Barstow
House: No 3, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Air Force.
Died: 27 January 1919 aged 24 in United Kingdom. Killed flying in England.
Cemetery: Weston-Super-Mare cemetery 2451

Son of John and Mary Barstow, The Lodge, Weston-super-Mare. b. 1895.
Upper IV B—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket; XI Football; Fives Pair; Gymnasium IV.
Cadet Officer.
Great War, Private N. Somerset Yeomanry 1914; Lieutenant R.A.F.

Times Obituary:
Eric Jackson-Bristow RAF who was killed while flying near Caterham in Surrey on January 27 aged 23 was the only son of Mr J.J.Jackson-Barstow and Mrs Jackson-Barstow of "The Lodge" Weston-Super-Mare. At the age of 19 Captain Barstow enlisted in the North Somerset Yeomanry in Bath and took part in the battle of November 17th 1914 outside Ypres in which a number were killed, and Barstow was wounded. He was given a commission after a few weeks sick leave, and was appointed ADC to General Lee, serving on the East Coast.
When thoroughly restored to health he applied for a transfer to the Royal Air Force. He gained his "wings" in 1917, and had since been flying regularly in France and Germany. He was making for Kenley Aerodrome when a heavy snow storm came on and in endeavouring to land he crashed into a bank in Marden Park."

Photo of Arthur Stannus Jagger
2nd Lieut Arthur Stannus Jagger
House: No 2, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: Royal Welch Fus..
Died: 01 October 1918 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds near Bois de Biez.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Chocques Mil Cemetery 111 B 16

Son of Arthur and Lilian Anne Jagger, of "Uplands," Pashley Rd., Eastbourne, and School House, Mansfield, b. 1898.
Modern III—Army II. House Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 9th Bn. Royal Welch Fusiliers 1918.

'In January 1917 he entered Sandhurst. He passed out in December, and was gazetted to the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Last June he went out to France, and it was on September 30th that he received a severe shell wound, from the effects of which he died on the following day. Stannus Jagger had such a lovable disposition that one wonders whether he ever in his life made an enemy. Not only was he happy in himself, but his unfailing cheerfulness made for happiness in others. With all his light-heartedness and strong sense of humour, there was a serious side to his character which showed itself in his keen devotion to duty, and in the sound principles upon which all his conduct was based. He was eminently trustworthy; in thought, as well as in deed, he was a thorough gentleman. His many friends will deeply regret his death, and will feel the greatest sympathy with his parents in the loss of their only son.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Epitaph chosen by his father, former headmaster of Queen Elizabeth Grammar School, Mansfield, comes from Macbeth Act 5 Scene 8:
WHY THEN, GOD'S SOLDIER BE HE!
Epitaphs of the Great War

Service record: WO 339/89207

Photo of Basil Oliver Jenkins
Lieutenant Colonel Basil Oliver Jenkins
House: Sch, 1894 - 1897. Regiment: Royal Air Force.
Died: 07 February 1919 aged 39 in Germany. Died at Koblentz.
Cemetery: Cologne Southern X11 D 5

Born in 1880 at Coquimbo, Chile. Son of Oliver William and Mary Saunders Jenkins, of "Elsinore," 8, Redland Green, Bristol, and Elsinore, Bodenham Road, Hereford.
Modern IV—Lower Modern I.
School of Mines, Truro ; Mining Expert, many years in Mexico.
Great War, Lieutenant R.N.V.R. attached R.N.A.S. 1914 ; British War Mission to U.S.A. 1915-17 ; Lieutenant R.A.F. ; C.B.E. Died at Koblentz February 7, 1919.

'A mining expert, he had spent many years in Mexico, and only came home in 1913 in consequence of the civil war in that country. He volunteered for service, and was gazetted Lieutenant R.N.V.R. attached to R.N.A.S. in 1914. From 1915 to 1917 he was mainly engaged on Government work in America, being latterly attached to the British War Mission to the U.S.A. For his services he was awarded the C.B E. and made Lieut.-Col. in the R.A.F. Subsequently he paid a third visit to the States. He died at Koblentz, on February 7th, 1919, of pneumonia following influenza.' (Malvernian, Nov 1919).

Photo of Cyril Donald Thomas Jenkins
Lieutenant Cyril Donald Thomas Jenkins
House: No 1, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: Royal Welch Fus..
Died: 03 October 1916 aged 21 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying.
Cemetery: Swansea, Oystermouth

Son of Charles Bevan Jenkins and Kate Edith Anna Elizabeth Jenkins, of Beryl House, Wells, Somerset and Uplands House, Swansea, b. 1895.
Lower IV—Matriculation Class.
Articled to a Solicitor.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Welch Fusiliers 1914 ; Lieutenant R.F.C.
Wounded at Gallipoli.

'Although never a prominent member of the School, Cyril Jenkins gained the affection of all with whom he came in contact; simple and unassuming, there was a hidden strength of character which attracted all. He left in December 1913 to follow his father's profession as a solicitor, but upon the outbreak of war he joined the 3rd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers with his chum, John Morris (who was killed in action on 15th May, 1915) ; he was sent to the Dardanelles in the following September, and saw most of the campaign in Gallipoli, receiving a slight wound just at the end of his time; from this he quickly recovered, and on returning home joined the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in consequence of an accident to his machine on 3rd October.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

His plane an Avro 504A 7970, in 58 Sqn, lost speed in a turn and nose dived in the Cramlington area.
Fatal Air Accidents

Photo of Spencer Henry Jeudwine
Captain Spencer Henry Jeudwine
House: No 4, 1909 - 1914. Regiment: Lincolnshire Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 21 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 1C

Son of Ven. Archdeacon Jeudwine and Harriet Elizabeth Jeudwine, Lincoln, b. 1895.
Lower Shell—Science I. O.M. Science Prize 1913,14.. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Offered place at Caius College, Cambridge.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 2nd Bn Lincolnshire Regt. 1914, Captain.

'Jeudwine left in the summer of 1914, intending to proceed to Caius, Cambridge. Like many others, he found himself at once called to other and sterner duties, and obtained a commission in the Special Reserve of the Lincoln Regiment. He saw a good deal of active service on the Western Front, and was twice wounded—May 1915 and 1916. On the first day of the battle of the Somme (July 1st, 1916) he was in action with his regiment, and was posted at the end of the day as Missing. Nothing further having been heard, he is now presumed to have been killed in action: one of thirteen O. Ms. who fell on that fatal day. He was a boy of considerable intellectual capacity, with varied interests and a catholic taste for all literature.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

On the first day of the Battle of the Somme his battalion was ordered to attack the German held village of Ovillers-La-Boiselle. The battalion had 450 casualties, including 21 officers with him being among the 'missing'.
Detailed biography at Brighton College Remembers

Photo of Alexander Vyvyan Johnston
Lieutenant Alexander Vyvyan Johnston
House: No 6, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Liverpool Regt..
Died: 16 August 1917 aged 33 in Belgium. Killed in action near Ypres.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Tyne Cot Memorial P31/34, 162. 162A. 163A

Born December 3rd 1884. Son of S. L. Johnston, Meldreth, Cambs.
Army III—Modern I. House Prefect; House XI Cricket; XL Football.
In business (Gatebeck Gunpowder Works).
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 12th Bn King's Liverpool Regt. 1914, Lieutenant.

'The youngest of a quartette of brothers, he was a fine type of boyhood. He received a Commission in the Liverpool Regt., and saw a good deal of service until he was killed in action in September of this year.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Husband of Lilian Aimee Johnston, of Woodside, Ings, Kendal, Westmorland.

Service record: WO 339/16383

Photo of Charles Ernest Johnston
Major Charles Ernest Johnston
House: No 1, 1888 - 1889. Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders.
Died: 23 March 1918 aged 47 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 8

Born: 18th December, 1871 – New Mill, Elgin. Son of Colonel Charles James and Mary Johnston, Lesmurdie, Elgin.
Upper 1V—Shell. House Prefect.
Woollen Manufacturer; 3rd Batt. Seaforth Highlanders 1891 ; Captain 1895; served with them in the South African War 1899—1901 ;
Great War, 1914, Recruiting Officer; Lieut.-Colonel 6th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders.
Killed in action, March 23, 1918 near Beaumetz; D.S.O. T D, Despatches (2).
Occupation: Woollen manufacturer.
Husband of Mabel Frances Irene Ryan (formerly Johnston), of 1, Brompton Square, London.

'After leaving School he joined his father in business as a woollen manufacturer, at Elgin, Scotland. At the same time he joined the local Volunteer Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders, in which he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in 1891 and Captain in 1895. He took the regimental service Battalion out to South Africa, and was gazetted Hon. Captain in the Army, attached to Scottish Horse in April 1902, and re-joined his home unit as Adjutant in October 1902, and was subsequently transferred to Scottish Horse as Major. In 1914 Major Johnston, who had retired previous to the War, was appointed Recruiting Officer for Morayshire, Scotland. In 1915 he was asked to raise a regiment, the 2/6th Seaforth Highlanders. In this task he was successful, and he commanded the regiment both in Elgin and at Ripon Camp till he was sent to France in Jan. 1917. He joined the 6th Seaforth Highlanders as second in command, and was with the Battalion and was temporarily commanding when he was killed, on March 23rd, 1918. He was awarded the D.S.O. for work he did during the 21st—23rd March, 1918, and was twice mentioned in despatches. Major Johnston was first reported missing on March 23rd, and he has since been presumed to have been killed on that date.' (Malvernian, Nov 1919).

'“On the morning of March 23rd, Major Johnston was going round the line visiting the men, when it appears he was sniped and fell, and as the enemy broke through at that point shortly afterwards, it was quite impossible to reach him.”
Elgin Golf club Roll of Honour Edinburgh's War

Photo of Donald Clark Johnston
Captain Donald Clark Johnston
House: No 1, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Scottish Rifles.
Died: 13 September 1918 aged 24 in France. Died of wounds.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: St Sever Cemetery Rouen C 5 2

Born 2 Dec 1894 in Shanghai. Son of John Clark Johnston and Frances E. Johnston, Oriental Club, London, b. 1894.
Upper V—VI. House Scholar. House Prefect. XI Cricket; House XI Football.
Heath Harrison Exhibitioner, Brasenose College, Oxford.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 1st/8th Bn. Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 1914, Captain.
Husband of Ethel M. Johnston, of Sellarsbrook, Monmouth.

' Few boys have made more friends at School than did Donald Johnston, his sunny disposition making him a favourite with all who knew him. Eye trouble during the last year of his School life prevented him from trying for a Scholarship; but in both work and games he played a prominent part in the life of his House. On leaving Malvern he entered B.N.C. Oxford, where he spent a year, during which he was cox of his College Boat, and he played cricket for the 'Varsity, only just missing his "Blue." On the outbreak of war he applied for a Commission, which he received in October 1914, being promoted to Captain five months later; in 1916 he was given a permanent Commission, but was wounded in September of that year and sent home on "sick leave." In June of the present year he returned to active service, but was seriously wounded in August; septic trouble supervened, and he died from heart failure on 13th September.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

He was seriously wounded during the attack on Hill 158 near Beugneux which commenced at 4.15am on 1st August 1918 and took place in dense fog, shell-smoke and mustard gas. He died of his wounds 6 weeks later.
Final Wicket By Nigel McCrery

Photo of Harold Crossley Jowett
2nd Lieut Harold Crossley Jowett
House: No 3, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died: 01 September 1918 aged 20 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Bancourt British Cemetery V11 D 1

Son of W. H. and Emily Jowett, Ardencraig, Grassendale, Liverpool, b. 1898.
Upper IV—Lower Modern I.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 7th Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers.

'A sturdy boy, who was quietly building himself, and showing much promise of usefulness. Friendships with him were not sought in vain, and they were most genuine friendships.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918)

Unit War Diary: WO 95/2655/1

Photo of Oswald Rees Keene
Private Oswald Rees Keene
House: No 1, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: West Riding Regt..
Died: 05 May 1915 aged 24 in United Kingdom. Killed in action at Hill 60.
Cemetery: West Riding Divisional Cemetery B3

Son of Rev. Rees Keene (Rector of Gosforth) and Louisa Margaret Keene, Gosforth, Cumberland, b. 1891.
Lower V—Remove.
Law Student; 5th Batt. Border Regt. (T.F.) ; resigned.
Great War, Private 2nd Bn Duke of Wellington's Regt.
Died of effects of Gas, Ypres - Hill 60.
St Bees

Photo of Walter Fischer Keep
2nd Lieut Walter Fischer Keep
House: No 3, 1897 - 1901. Regiment: Hampshire Regt..
Died: 07 June 1917 aged 35 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of Messines. Cemetery: Bus House Cemetery A 20

Son of Walter and Helene Keep, of 11, Rossdale Rd., Putney and 6 Lower Common South, Putney, S.W. b. 1882.
Modern III—Lower Modern I. House Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 15th Bn. Hampshire Regiment.
Husband of Florence Keep.

'W. F. Keep when at School gained no distinguished position, but he is remembered as of a bright and happy disposition, always ready with a bright smile to make the best of everything. He was always keen on everything connected with his house and School. It is said of him by his brother officers that "he did not know what fear meant and always took a tremendous interest in everything that went on around him." His Colonel speaks of him as "a most promising officer, and all will miss his cheery confidence and good humour."' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Extract from unit war diary:
7.6.17 At Zero hour (3.10am) we blew a large mine under the enemy's crater at St Eloi, at the same time our artillery opened a barrage, when the 123rd Brigade commenced attacking - Two hours later we moved up in artillery formation to the Damstrasse & upon arrival there we deployed into position ready for the attack. Our own barrage was excellent on the night but very ragged on the left and centre.
6.50am. We moved forward on our objectives. Many casualties were caused by the guns remaining on the second objective on the left, & it was not until the artillery were informed, that it was finally occupied, after this barrage had finally moved forward.
9.10am It was observed that enemy were moving in the valley beyond Observer Row and at 10.15am 500 men were rushed over the ridge just behind to join them, these were received with pretty heavy Lewis Gun fire, and several casualties were caused, from this period onwards various attempts to make a local counter attack on Denys Wood were made & these took place at 10am and 2 and 7pm. None of the attacks were in any degree successful and the one at 3pm was unexpectedly met by our own attack carried out by the 24th Division. Prior to these attacks we were subjected to intense bombardments, which died away when our artillery opened fire.
Our casualties were not heavy, A Coy suffering most severely & 2nd Lieut Keep of C Coy was killed.

Service record: WO 339/67075
Unit war diary: WO 95/2634/5

Photo of William George Stanhope Kenny
Captain William George Stanhope Kenny
House: No 7, 1895 - 1897. Regiment: 39th Garhwal Rifles (I.A.).
Died: 10 March 1915 aged 34 in France. Killed in action at Neuve Chapelle.
Battle: Battle of Neuve Chapelle. Cemetery: Laventie Mil Cemetery La Gorgue 1V G 3

Born 6th May 1881 at Madras. Son of Lieut.-Colonel E. E. Kenny (Indian Army), 1 Esmond Road, Chiswick, and Elizabeth Kenny, of Highlands, Roundham Hill, Paignton, Devon.
Army III—II. Exhibitioner. House XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Hampshire Regt. 1900 ; West Yorkshire Regt. 1901 ; Indian Army (39th Garhwal Rifles) 1902 ; Captain 1909 ; South African War 1900-01, Queen's Medal with 4 Clasps.
After joining the Army he qualified as 1st class Interpreter in Russian, and also passed the Lower Standard in Persian with a view to becoming an interpreter.

He accompanied his regiment to France in October 1914, and led his men into a German trench at Neuve Chapelle where he was twice wounded, and then killed by a shot in the head.
Biography at IWM

Photo of Lionel Kerwood
Major Lionel Kerwood
House: No 7, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 21 October 1916 aged 30 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 5A/5C

Son of A. Kerwood, Watling House, Barnt Green, b. 1886.
Middle V—Remove. Minor Scholar. Lea Shakespeare.
Solicitor 1908 ; Captain 8th Worcester Regt. 1909 ;
Great War, mobilised 1914, Major.

He disembarked at Boulogne on March 31, 1915, with the 1/8th Battalion.
He was promoted to Major at the front and became Second-in-Command of the 1/8th Worcesters.

'Major Kerwood had always taken a keen interest in military matters. Twelve years ago he joined the Volunteers at Redditch. He became a captain, and was instrumental in raising a company of Territorials at King's Norton. He afterwards obtained funds for building a drill hall, which was opened about four years ago He went to the front a year and eight months ago, and was killed in action on October 21st while in temporary command of a battalion of the Cheshire Regiment.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

He was killed on October 21, 1916, while in temporary command of the 13th (Service) Battalion, The Cheshire Regiment, when the unit made a successful assault on Regina Trench, which ran north of Courcelette, in which the battalion captured around 250 prisoners.
Redditch Advertiser

Photo of Chester Winterbon Killby
Lieutenant Chester Winterbon Killby
House: No 3, 1898 - 1899. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 21 March 1918 aged 36 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 7-10

Son of Thomas Killby (butcher and meat purveyor) and Annie Killby, 152 Highbury New Park, N. b. 1882.
Modern IV—Lower Modern II.
Stock Exchange.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant "C" Bty. 307th Bde. Royal Field Artillery , 1914.
Husband of Gladys Cressy Spear (formerly Killby), of Brewhurst, Loxwood, Billinghurst, Sussex.

'Chester Killby as a boy had a quiet and retiring nature, below which was a strength of sterling character, which endeared him to all his friends. He left School early to go into business, and for some years was a member of the London Stock Exchange. When war broke out he volunteered, and was gazetted as a 2nd Lieut, to the R.F.A. After training he went to France, and very soon proved to be one of the bravest of the brave, frequently volunteering for any post of danger. He was in command of an anti-tank gun, in a forward post, on March 21st. when the German offensive began. For some time he was reported missing, but news has since come from a wounded prisoner in Germany that he was seen, standing alone by his gun, surrounded by the enemy, till he fell, mortally wounded.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

On March 20, 1918, Lt. Killby took command of an anti-tank gun in front of Holnon Wood, near St Quentin, and the following day he was reported missing, believed killed in action, defending his command.
Biography at Stewkley

Service record: WO 374/39550

Photo of Wilfred Ernest Hertslet King
Private Wilfred Ernest Hertslet King
House: Day, 1907 - 1910. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 14 July 1916 aged 23 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 2C/3A

Son of B. B. King, I.C.S. b. 1893.
Army III—Science Form.
Ranching in Argentina.
Great War, Private 7th Bn Leicester Regt. 1914.

'Upon leaving Malvern, Willie King went to the Argentine, and for four years worked on a ranch, intending to make farming his life's work ; but upon the outbreak of war he at once gave up his post in order to enlist in the Leicester Regiment; after a short training in England he was sent to France, and fell during the battle on the Somme. No details have been received as to his death, and he is simply reported as "missing, believed killed," but since his identity badge has been found and returned to his mother, there is but little hope that he survived.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Below War diary describes detailed attacks at Mametz wood and Bazentin-le-Petit wood during the Battle of the Somme.
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2164/2

Photo of Hugh Eric Coleraine Knight
Captain Hugh Eric Coleraine Knight
House: No 6, 1906 - 1908. Regiment: East Lancashire Regt..
Died: 11 April 1918 aged 26 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Ploegsteert Memorial P 5/6

Son of H. C. Knight, 1 Baron Grove, Mitcham. b. 1892.
Upper IV A—Upper Shell.
Great War, Captain 3rd Bn. attd. 1st Bn. East Lancashire Regt., Special Reserve.

The below unit war diary describes in great detail the operations of the 11th April where Capt H E C Knight is among the list of 'Missing'. 10 other officers and over 200 other ranks were also casualties (ie over a quarter of the battalion).
Unit War Diary: WO 95/3061/1

Photo of Dudley Ogilvie Laing
Captain Dudley Ogilvie Laing
House: No 6, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 27 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 10B/11B/12B

Son of Farquhar M. Laing, Farnley Grange, Corbridge-on-Tyne. b. 1889.
Middle V—VI. Minor Scholar.
Shipowner.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 22nd (Tyneside Scottish) Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers 1914, Captain.
Killed in action at La Boiselle on the Somme.

'As a boy he was shy and reticent, and did not distinguish himself greatly in the general life of the School. He joined a Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers in November 1914, and at the time of his death he commanded his Company. He was killed in action in July of this year.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Unit War Diary extract:
1st July 1916. 7.30am. The battalion moved forward to the attack on the enemy trenches south of La Boiselle. Heavy enemy gun fire was experienced but the Bn, less heavy casualties suffered, reached enemy 2nd line.
A small party proceeded toward the enemy 3rd line but had to retire owing to heavy enemy fire.
8am. Six separate attempts to rush our flanks were made by the enemy without avail.
12.45pm. Strength 7 officers and 200 other ranks.
10.15pm All ranks greatly in need of water and very much fatigued.

Service record: WO 339/18934
Unit war diary: WO 95/2463/1

Photo of Gerald Ogilvie Laing
Captain Gerald Ogilvie Laing
House: Sch, 1901 - 1905. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 06 June 1917 aged 30 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 2/3

Born June 30th 1887. Son of F . M. Laing, Farnley Grange, Corbridge-on-Tyne.
Middle IV B—Science Form.
Shipowner.
He attended Armstrong College in Newcastle, where he studied Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Engineering. He gained a BSc.
Great War, Captain 20th (Tyneside Scottish) Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers.
Husband of Edith Frances Laing, of 15, Kingsland, Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne.

Extract from unit war diary:
Greenland Hill
On the morning of June 6th 1917, the enemy were reported by the Royal Flying Corps to be holding the position with about twenty men, so it was decided to attack at once over the open, the men of No 1 and 3 Coys to assist by bombing along the trench. At about 2.30pm one of our light trench mortars opened a short burst of fire, and this attack was made as soon as the Stokes Gun finished firing. The enemy appeared to be taken by surprise as the whole position was captured with only slight resistance, although two officers and seventy two other ranks were taken prisoner, two light machine guns and one light trench mortar captured.
At 1am (on the 7th) the enemy launched a strong counter attack but only succeeded in getting to within twenty yards of our trenches with at least 400 casualties. Our casualties were very small.
Newcastle University memorial

Service record: WO 339/14775
Unit war diary: WO 95/2462/4

Photo of Newton Frederick Seymour Lane
Private Newton Frederick Seymour Lane
House: No 5, 1893 - 1897. Regiment: Australian Infantry.
Died: 08 June 1917 aged 38 in Belgium. Killed in action at Messines.
Battle: Battle of Messines. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 7/17

Son of Colonel Cecil Newton Lane, C.M.G., and Adela Mary Lane, Foster Winston Hall, Salop, b. 1879.
Ill—Modern III.
Aspatria College ; served with Paget's Horse in the South African War, Medal; afterwards in Tasmania.
Great War, Private Australian Infantry.
Husband of Mrs. V. A. Lane. Native of Shrewsbury, England.

'He was one of the most popular boys in the house. With particularly pleasing manners, and a bright disposition he made many friends'. (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Photo of Percy Ernald Lane
2nd Lieut Percy Ernald Lane
House: No 5, 1895 - 1897. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 08 May 1915 aged 34 in Belgium. Killed in action at Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 10

Born 15 Jan 1881 at Bonigale, Shropshire. Son of Colonel C. N. Lane, C.M.G., Whiston Hall, Shropshire, b. 1881.
Ill—Lower IV.
Formerly at Aspatria College ; served in the South African War with Paget's Horse; afterwards in Canada.
Rancher in Canada.
Great War, Private Canadian Infantry 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant 1915 Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment).

'Percy Lane served with Paget's Horse in the South African War, receiving a medal and clasp. He subsequently went to Canada, and on the outbreak of the present war enlisted in the Canadian Infantry; in this he obtained a Commission and was killed in action on or about May l0th, 1915.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

'On the 8th May,1915, Captain Dennison, Lieutenant Lane and a few men were last seen fighting a rearguard action in the front-line trench near the Bellewaerde and Frezenberg Ridges, before being overwhelmed by the German assault.'
Invision Zone
National archives of Canada

Photo of Bertram Lawrence
Captain Bertram Lawrence
House: No 2, 1891 - 1895. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 28 October 1914 aged 38 in France. Killed in action near Lille.
Cemetery: Ration Farm Armentieres V111 D

Born 24th Dec 1876 at 158 Queen's road, Bayswater. Son of Dr. and Mrs H. Lawrence, Cheltenham and 'Rahere', Babbacombe, Devon.
Army Side. School Prefect. Shooting VIII; House XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; East Yorkshire Regt. 1898; Captain 1907; served with 5th Batt. Mounted Infantry in South African War 1902, Queen’s Medal with 3 Clasps.
Great War, 1st Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment; killed in action near Armentieres October 28, 1914; Despatches.

'From quite early days Bertram Lawrence showed special aptitude for the profession which he had chosen, and it was not difficult for those who knew him as a boy to forecast a successful career for him as an officer. He seemed to have then the true military instinct. What we have heard of him from time to time, since he got his commission, proves how fully early expectations have been realised. He did excellent work at the front up to the time of his being killed in action.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914)

He was shot by a sniper while cheering and leading his men to retake a lost trench.
Biography at IWM

Photo of Thomas Edward Lawrence
2nd Lieut Thomas Edward Lawrence
House: Sch, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: Royal Sussex Regt..
Died: 24 September 1918 aged 19 in France. Died of wounds near Peronne.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Doingt Comminal Extension 1 B 38

Son of Henry Lakin Lawrence and Emma Lawrence, 19 Walpole Terrace, Brighton, b. 1899.
Upper V—Army I. House Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 7th Bn. Royal Sussex Regiment. 1917.

'Tom Lawrence was wounded on September 23rd, and died at a casualty clearing station the following day, never having recovered consciousness. At School he was a well-known figure amongst his contemporaries, always anxious to take his part in any activities, and an enthusiastic member of his House. Full of spirits, and ever ready for an argument, behind an easy optimism that a stranger might mistake for irresponsibility, there lay a genuine loyalty to his friends and School, and a depth of feeling he could not always conceal.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

'24/9/18 Enemy attacked under heavy barrage at 11.30am, & was driven off with heavy casualties. 2/Lt T E Lawrence wounded early in the morning & died of wounds later in the day.' (Unit War Diary extract).

Service record: WO 339/89208
Unit war diary: WO 95/1856/3

Photo of Leslie Arthur Lea-Smith
Lieutenant Leslie Arthur Lea-Smith
House: No 3, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 07 July 1916 aged 19 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Aveluy Communal Extension F 68

Son of Harold and Adele Lea-Smith, of Heathfield Houses, Windmill Rd., Wimbledon Common and Gothic Lodge, Wimbledon Common, S.W. b. 1897.
Upper V—Matriculation Class. Minor Scholar. XXII Football.
Magdalen College, Oxford.
Great War, Private Middlesex Regt. 1914 ; Lieutenant 6th Bn. The Buffs (East Kent Regiment).

'Full of vigorous life, Leslie Lea-Smith showed great promise in his school days. He was a delightful companion, particularly attractive for his sturdy independence. He answered his country's call for the first 100,000 men by enlisting in the Public Schools Battalion (16th Middlesex), where he obtained two stripes. In February, 1915, on his 18th birthday, he received his commission in the "Buffs" (East Kent Regiment). He was wounded in the Hohenzollern crater fighting in March, 1916, and many will recall his graceful figure and imperturbability from the following account which appeared in the "Daily Chronicle": "When all the men in one of these infernal craters were dead or wounded, Lieutenant Lea-Smith ran forward with a Lewis gun, and served it during a fierce attack by German bombers until it jammed. Then he left the gun and took to bombing, and that single figure of his flinging grenades like an overarm bowler kept the enemy at bay until reinforcements reached him." For this act of heroism he was mentioned in despatches. He was killed in action on July 7th, and his Colonel writes: "He was quite the most gallant boy I have known, and his fearlessness almost amounted to recklessness, so great was his utter disregard of danger. His loss to the Battalion is irreparable, and he will be truly mourned by both officers and his men who were devoted to him, as their comfort was always his first thought."' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).
Biography at Merton

Photo of Alfred Robin Martyn Lees
Private Alfred Robin Martyn Lees
House: Sch, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Army Service Corps.
Died: 21 March 1918 aged 34 in France. Killed in action near Ecour.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 95

Son of James Arthur Lees, J.P., and Lucy Jane Lees, The Moor House, Congleton, Cheshire, b. 1884.
Lower Modern I I I - Modern I.
Victoria University, Manchester; B.Sc. Tech. 1912 ;
Director Chamber Colliery Company.
Great War, Private A.S.C. 1914, attd. 2nd/1st North Midland Field Amb. Royal Army Medical Corps .

'Lees was in Modern I when he left to proceed to the Victoria University, Manchester. Here he studied mining engineering, took the B. Sc. Tech. degree, and became Assistant Manager and Director of Chamber Colliery Co. He enlisted in August, 1914, and before the end of the month was in France as a Motor Transport Driver. He was twice recommended for a Commission, but an unfortunate impediment of speech prevented these recommendations taking effect. On March 21st, 1918, when driving an ambulance for the R.A.M.C, he volunteered to try and get the wounded away from Ecour; the ambulance was destroyed by machine-gun fire, and it is presumed that he was killed in what was described by his commanding officer as "a most gallant and self-sacrificing attempt."' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).
Biography at Biddulph society

Photo of Ashley Gordon Scott Leggatt
2nd Lieut Ashley Gordon Scott Leggatt
House: No 6, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 16 September 1916 aged 31 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thistle Dump Longueval C 22

Born June 15th 1885. Son of Charles Ashby Scott Leggatt M.D. and Helen Henrietta Leggatt (formerly Anderson), 2 Walton Place, S.W.
Middle IV—Army III. House XI Cricket.
Natal Mounted Police 1903-12 ; served in Natal Native Rebellion, Medal; Civil Service N. Rhodesia 1912,13 ; Assistant Secretary of Falcon Mines, Rhodesia.
Great War 1914 (overseas), 2nd Lieutenant "C" Bty. 47th Bde. Royal Field Artillery .
Husband of Ada Leggatt, of 30, Manchester St., Manchester Square, London. (Married at Church of St Thomas , Regent Street on 15th March 1915).

'At the outbreak of the war he returned to England and obtained a commission in the R.A., and according to the report of his C.O. proved a most capable officer. He was wounded in October of last year, and was killed in action in September of this year. He was a boy and young man of singular charm and strong personality, and extremely popular wherever he was.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

'Bazentin-le-Grand. 16th Sept. 9.30am The enemy kept up a heavy barrage on Switch Trench throughout the day. 2/Lt A.G.S. Leggatt killed.' (Unit War Diary)

Service record: WO 339/16782
Unit war diary: WO 95/1887/1

Photo of Francis Wharton Lemarchand
Surgeon Lieutenant Francis Wharton Lemarchand
House: No 1, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: H. M. S. Phoebe.
Died: 12 February 1919 aged 26 in United Kingdom. Died of pneumonia.
Cemetery: Barnstaple Devon A 150

Son of A. W. Lemarchand, M.D. (O.M.), and Mrs. E. A. Lemarchand, of 1, Victoria Terrace, Barnstaple, b. 1893.
Middle IV—Matriculation Class.
St. Bartholomew's Hospital; M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 1915.
Great War 1915-19 (overseas), Surgeon-Lieutenant H.M.S. "Phoebe." Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

'He was the son of Dr. A. W. Lemarchand (O. M.). He studied medicine at St. Bartholomew's, and after qualifying obtained a commission as Surgeon Sub-Lieut, in the R.N-V.R. He took part in the Zeebrugge and Ostend Expeditions with H.M.S. Whirlwind, and came safely through. An attack of pneumonia early this year proved fatal, and he died on February 2nd. We offer our most sincere condolences to his father on the loss of a son of much promise.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919)

Captain Christopher Francis Aden Ley
House: No 2, 1907 - 1912. Regiment: Notts' Yeomanry / RFC.
Died: 16 March 1918 aged 25 in United Kingdom. -.
Cemetery: St James Lealholm NORTH

Born 7th June 1893. Son of the late Sir Francis Ley, 1st Bart. and of Lady Ley, of Lealholm Lodge, Lealholm, Yorks. Born at Barrow-on-Trent.
Pembroke College, Cambridge.

'Christopher Ley, Captain Notts Yeomanry and R.F.C., was accidentally killed on March 16th, while taking part in an exhibition flight at Croydon. In August 1915 he went out to Gallipoli, where after two months' service he contracted typhoid fever, and spent some time in hospital. He then joined the R.F.C. and was wounded in an aerial flight in France last June, when his commanding officer wrote, in appreciation of his services, that he had proved himself a good pilot and a gallant fellow. He had just been passed as fit for service, and was on the point of returning to the front, when the accident happened which cut short his career. As a boy, he took a keen interest in all games, and was an excellent shot, being a member of the School VIII, and shooting at Bisley in 1911 and 1912. After leaving school, he went up to Pembroke College, Cambridge, and in 1913 he formed one of the team of four which won the Veterans' Trophy for Malvern at Bisley. It will be remembered that his brother, Maurice, was killed in action in November 1914.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Norfolk Chronicle 22 March 1918:
'Captain C Ley RFC was killed while flying at Croydon on Saturday. While he was giving an exhibition flight in connection with the local Tank Day, he came down too low and his machine (Sopwith Camel B7462) struck the chimney stack of a house.'
Biography at nottinghamshire.gov.uk

Photo of Maurice Aden Ley
2nd Lieut Maurice Aden Ley
House: No 2, 1910 - 1913. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 01 November 1914 aged 19 in France. Killed in action at Ypres.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: White House Cemetery St Jean Les Ypres 111 P 30

Born 5th August 1895. Son of Sir Francis Ley, Bt., Epperstone Manor, Notts, and Lady Ley of Lealholm Lodge, Lealholm, Yorks.
Upper IV A—Army II. House Prefect. House XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; East Kent Regt. 1914. Attached 1st Bn. Lincolnshire Regiment.

'At the end of September he was gazetted to the Buffs and was with the Reserve Battalion at Dover till Oct. 24th, when in answer to an urgent call he was sent to the front to be attached to the 1st Battalion of the Lincoln Regt. He had been at the front only five days when he fell. The Lincolns had advanced during the night to a position which proved to be extremely precarious, and at daybreak, owing to the enemy's rifle and artillery fire, were forced to retire. A few minutes before the retirement began, he was shot through the heart. So a most promising career has come to an untimely end. He had the makings of a first-rate officer; always energetic, intelligent, and exceptionally smart, he threw himself wholeheartedly into his work. He was one of the best of fellows, and his simplicity of character and cheerful disposition won him many friends. He made his mark at School as an athlete. Though heavily built, he was a fine sprinter and jumper. Few will forget the great struggle in the Sports of 1913 when he lost the Champion Cup by one mark.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914).

He was killed at Wystchaete, near Ypres, while endeavouring to assist his wounded men in a retirement.

The Maurice Ley Scholarship was founded in his memory.
Bond of sacrifice at IWM

Photo of Francis Howard Lindsay
Captain Francis Howard Lindsay
House: No 2, 1887 - 1895. Regiment: London Scottish Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 40 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 9C/13C

Son of W. A. Lindsay, K.C., Clarenceux King of Arms, and Lady Harriet Lindsay, 17 Cromwell Road, b. 1876.
III—VI. Dowdeswell Prize. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Football 1893,94; XXII Cricket; Shooting VIII (captain); Lieutenant in Corps.
Scholar, Clare College, Cambridge; BA. (Jun. Opt.) 1898;
Examiner Scotch Education Department 1899; Hon. Secretary O.M.F.C. 1900-08; Captai1st/14th Bn. London Regiment (London Scottish);
Great War, mobilised 194.

Husband of Helen Margaret Lindsay, of 7, Emperor's Gate, South Kensington, London.

'By the death of Francis Howard Lindsay, Malvern has lost a devoted son, the country has lost a loyal and gallant officer, and many people have lost a true friend. The same keenness which marked his life as a man was one of his chief characteristics when he was a boy at school. During his time here he strove with unfailing energy and enthusiasm to promote the interests of his house and the interests of the School. His efforts met with conspicuous success. He won considerable distinction for himself and much more for his house. He was prominent in every part of the life of the School. In football he did good service as a member of the XI, and he was one of the mainstays of his house team. As a cricketer and a fives-player he achieved considerable success at times. He shot for the School at Bisley on several occasions, and in the Corps he was a keen volunteer at all times, and in the latter part of his time he was a capable officer. His intellectual attainments, especially in mathematics, were considerable. After he left Malvern he showed his devotion to the School by the deep interest which he took in all that went on here, and he rendered most important services to the O. M. Football Club for a considerable period. He kept up his rifle-shooting and regularly attended the Bisley meetings, and sometimes shot with great success. But what claimed his chief attention and occupied much of his leisure time was the work connected with the Volunteer (or Territorial) Force. When he entered the Scotch Education Department in London he joined the London Scottish Corps, and he did good service to his country by helping to give the men of that force a sound physical and military training. Of his professional work in London a writer in the Scotsman says: "His administrative experience as an examiner in the Scotch Education Department was wide, and in 1912 he was selected to take special charge of the superannuation scheme for Scottish teachers—a new branch of work. It was a task for which his mathematical tastes and his habit of careful and conscientious work made him admirably fitted, and he threw himself into it with great zest. It is not too much to say that the teachers of Scotland owe him a substantial debt of gratitude for his unsparing labours which enabled him to overcome the difficulties which attended the new scheme." In 1914 he volunteered with his regiment for foreign service, and was severely wounded at Messines in November of that year. He was not fit again for foreign service till May 1916, when he went to France a second time. He was killed in action on July 1st. He was gazetted temp. Major a few weeks before.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Service record: WO 374/42209
Unit war diary: WO 95/2956/1 Trench Map

Photo of Wymond Howard Lloyd
Captain Wymond Howard Lloyd
House: No 5, 1907 - 1912. Regiment: Herefordshire Regt..
Died: 19 March 1916 aged 23 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed in England.
Cemetery: Llangadock Carmathenshire

Son of H. M. Lloyd (O.M.), Delfryn, Llanwrda, Carmarthenshire, b. 1893.
Lower V—VI. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Football;
House XI Cricket.
New College, Oxford.
Great War (overseas), 2nd Lieutenant Herefordshire Regt. ; Captain.

'Wymond Howard Lloyd was the son of an O. M. of the first generation, and entered Foster's house in 1907. He was a hardworking boy who reached the VIth and left as Head of his House with an excellent record. He went up to New College, and was reading for Greats and the Civil Service; but the wave of 1914 carried him off with all his friends, and he joined the Herefordshire Regiment, and went with them to Gallipoli in August 1915. He contracted enteric at Suvla Bay, and after a long illness revisited Malvern before re-joining for light duty. He was accidentally killed on the railway near Oswestry on March 19th, a day before his twenty-third birthday.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

He had served in Flanders and Gallipoli, and was at Oswestry awaiting a Medical Board review.
He had dismissed a platoon after a route march and was crossing the railway line when he was knocked down by a train.
He died in Oswestry Cottage Hospital from his wounds.
Newspaper article at Herefordshire Light Infantry museum.

Photo of Wynell Hastings Lloyd
Lieutenant Wynell Hastings Lloyd
House: Sch, 1909 - 1912. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 18 April 1918 aged 24 in France. Accidentally killed (murdered) on active service.
Cemetery: Warloy Baillon Communal Extension 11 F 4

Son of E. W. M. Lloyd, Hartford House, Winchfield, and Eleanor E. Lloyd, of Hartley Wintney, Hants. b. 1894.
Upper V—Science I. Minor Scholar.
Apprenticed to an Architect.
Great War, Private 1914, 2nd Lieutenant 8th Lincoln Regt. ; Lieutenant 123rd Field Coy. Royal Engineers

'Wynell Lloyd showed a good deal of sturdy common-sense and determination at School. He was not popular in the ordinary sense of the word, but those who knew him best discovered the true value of his character, and he was one of those who merit and obtain the trust of others. On leaving School he took up the profession of an architect. Immediately after the outbreak of war he enlisted and served in the ranks for some months, and then gained his commission in the Lincolnshire Regiment. But feeling he could turn his special talents and training to better account in the Royal Engineers, he applied for a transference.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

At the proceeding of a Court Martial on 4th May 1918:
Corporal R. Prior stated that when Lieutenant Lloyd came on parade he noticed that Sapper Robert Bell was not wearing his putties. He brought the accused out in front of the parade, and Lloyd asked him why he was not wearing his putties. Bell said that they hurt his legs. Lloyd dismissed him and told him to go and put his putties on. While inspecting the rear of the two ranks, Lloyd was shot in the forehead and fell to the ground. Sapper Robert Bell was seen in a trench with a rifle.

The accused stated that he slipped when getting out of the trench to rejoin the parade, after failing to find his putties. His rifle flew forward and exploded. He had forgotten to remove the round placed in the barrel earlier in the day, when he went hunting for hare or partridge.
It was stated that the accused was a good shot and had shot game before, especially rabbits.
CSM Foster said that Bell told him "When I set out to accomplish a thing, I do it, there it is. I have done the section a good turn. You'll think of Bob Bell in years to come." He added that he was not aware of any ill feeling between Lieutenant Lloyd and the accused.
In mitigation it was stated, he had enlisted on 9 January 1915, and been in France since December 1915.

Sapper Robert Bell was sentenced to death by shooting with no recommendation for mercy. He was shot at 4.12 am on 22 May 1918.
Court Martial details at Woodyatt site

Photo of George Hood Lofthouse
2nd Lieut George Hood Lofthouse
House: No 1, 1900 - 1903. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 23 April 1917 aged 32 in France. Killed in action near Cherisy.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 4/5

Son of J. G. Lofthouse, Arrowfield, Boroughbridge, Yorks. b. 1885.
Lower IV—Modern II. House XI Football.
Engineer ; Partner in Rushworth, Ingleby and Lofthouse.
Great War, Private 1914, afterwards 2nd Lieutenant 4th Bn East Yorkshire Regt.

'He went out to the front in May, 1916, and was wounded on the Somme in the following September. He returned to the front at the beginning of this year, was reported missing on April 23rd, and is now reported to have been killed on that date.' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

'Arras. 28/4/17. At zero hour at 4.45am the barrage opened, and shells fell very short and at once we had serious casualties from them amongst officers, NCOs & men. The two flank companies especially suffered & it was not long before all officers in three companies were either killed or wounded. Enemy machine gun fire in the meantime had begun to tell.
At about 7am the enemy launched a vigorous counter attack from the direction of Vis-en-Artois and also from Cherisy.
When the enemy reached the original front line trench, the battalion had lost all its company officers & the battalion signalling officer.
In total casualties killed, wounded & missing were 17 officers & 352 other ranks.' (Unit War diary).
Memorial at St. Andrew's Church, Aldborough

Service record: WO 374/42711
Unit war diary: WO 95/2835/1

Photo of William Herbert Berkeley Long
2nd Lieut William Herbert Berkeley Long
House: No 4, 1913 - 1917. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 31 May 1918 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds near Gezaincourt.
Cemetery: Bagneux Brit Cemetery Gezaincourt 11 C 17

Son of William Cole Long and Minna Long, Spring Cottage, Watledge, Nailsworth. b. 1898.
Middle IV A—Army II. House Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 261st Siege Bty. Royal Garrison Artillery . Died of wounds May 31, 1918.

'He was sent to the front last winter, as Second Lieutenant in the R.A. On May 30th, while resting in a dug-out, he was severely wounded by fragments of a shell which had burst near-by. He was removed, quite conscious and even cheerful, to an Officers' CCS. Recovery was hoped for, but he died, unconscious, on the following day. He was a straightforward, open-hearted, unassuming boy, with a strong sense of humour, and is stated by the Officer commanding his battery to have been a most efficient officer, who cheerfully undertook any dangerous work demanded of him.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918).

Service record: WO 339/93926

Photo of William Louis Jennings Longbourne
Lieutenant William Louis Jennings Longbourne
House: No 5, 1900 - 1906. Regiment: Royal West Surrey Regt..
Died: 09 August 1915 aged 28 in Turkey. Killed in action at Suvla Bay.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 30/31

Son of Mrs C. R. Longbourne and late Charles R. V. Longbourne of Highmead, Guildford Liphook, Hants, b. 1887.
Lower IV—Matriculation Class. House XI Football; Anderson Medal.
Solicitor 1912 ; 1914. 2nd Lieutenant 5th Battalion attd. 2nd/4th Bn. The Queens (West Surrey Regt.)
Great War, mobilised 1914, Lieutenant.
Killed in action in Gallipoli August 9, 1915.

He was mortally wounded on May 8th, 1915, whilst leading his platoon near the crest of Chocolate Hill above Suvla Bay. His men went on but were driven back, and had to dig themselves in. It was found impossible to bring him in under the heavy fire during daylight, but he continued to give his orders as he lay in the open for some hours until he died. At school his cheery nature and peculiarly loyal and affectionate disposition endeared him to all who knew him. (Malvernian, Mar 1916).

'He took part in the landing at Suvla Bay on the early morning of 9 Aug 1915, and in the subsequent assault on Chocolate Hill, the same day; while leading his platoon in the attack he was badly wounded near the top of the hill, but refused to allow his men to help him, telling them to go on. Afterwards, owing to the cross fire and nature of the country, it was found impossible to get to him and he was never seen again. ' (De Ruvigny).

Photo of Archibald Owen Carwithen Longridge
Chaplain 4th Cl Archibald Owen Carwithen Longridge
House: No 4, 1894 - 1898. Regiment: Chaplains Dept..
Died: 12 October 1918 aged 38 in United Kingdom. Died in England of pneumonia after gas poisoning.
Cemetery: Topsham Devon 1 1684

Son of Michael Longridge, Linkvretten, Bowdon, Cheshire, b. 1880.
Shell—Remove. School Prefect. House XI Football.
Trinity College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1905 ; ordained 1906 ; Curate of St. John, Bethnal Green, 1906 ; Elland 1907 ; St. Peter, Coventry, 1908 ; St. James, Exeter, 1909 ; Clyst St. George 1911.
Great War, C.F. (overseas). Army Chaplains' Department. Died at Topsham of gas poisoning, October 12, 1918.

Husband of Constance Longridge, of 2, Clystlands, Topsham.

'If, intellectually, less prominent than his elder brothers, Archie Longridge was a boy of more than average ability, to which, perhaps, he hardly did justice at School. He impressed himself chiefly upon those who knew him best by his charm of spontaneity, the expression of a nature which responded quickly to environment. Though he wavered in the choice of a profession, in his final decision to take Holy Orders he followed the ideal of social service, which had been the main purpose of his boyhood. He was full of ideas, and in his clerical work developed considerable literary power. He offered himself as a Chaplain for service in the war, and was for two years and a half in France, and afterwards, when invalided home, for nearly a year at Grantham. While on leave at Topsham he contracted influenza, and died, on October I2th, of pneumonia, rendered fatal by the effects of German gas.' (Malvernian, Feb 1919).

Western Times, 15 October 1918:
"Death of the Rev. A. O. C. Longridge, M.A., at Topsham. It is with regret we announce the death of Rev. A. O. C. Longridge, M.A., formerly Assistant Diocesan Missioner for Exeter, and at the same time curate of Clyst St. George, near Topsham. In May, 1915, he went to France as chaplain, and served there two and a half years. Being gassed, he was invalided home at the beginning of the year. He subsequently became chaplain to the R.A.F. at Grantham. He came home recently to visit his wife and family at Topsham, Mrs. Longridge being down with influenza. The rev. gentleman contracted influenza while on the visit, and pneumonia supervening, he succumbed, at the age of 38 years."
Lives of the First World War

Photo of James Atkinson Longridge
Lieutenant Colonel James Atkinson Longridge CMG
House: No 4, 1889 - 1893. Regiment: 43 Erinpura Regt. (I.A.).
Died: 18 August 1916 aged 41 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Albert Communal Extension 1 M 9

Son of Michael and Frederica Longridge, Linkvretten, Bowdon. b. 1875.
Upper IV—Army Class. Minor Scholar. School Prefect. Shoot ing VIII; XXII Football; House XI Cricket. Lieutenant in Corps.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; passed out 2nd; West Surrey Regt. 1895;
Indian Army 1897; Major 1913; Assistant Secretary Imperial Defence Committee; China 1900, Despatches, Medal; Somaliland, 1903-04, Despatches, Medal with 2 Clasps.
Great War, G.S.O. Indian Expeditionary Force, C.M.G(Companion of St Michael & St George)., Brevet Lieut.-Colonel
Husband of Alice Lilian Longridge, of Bow Cot, Headley, Hants.

'In September 1914 he gave up his appointments at home to join the Army in France on the Staff of the Indian contingent. In 1915 he was transferred to become Chief Staff Officer of a Division. On August 18th, 1916, he stayed on in the trenches with characteristic thoroughness, to observe some operations which he had directed, and was hit by a stray bullet. He died instantaneously. The brief record which is given above of Colonel Longridge's twenty-one years' service is sufficient to show that in him the School has lost one of her most distinguished soldier sons. That, if merit met with due reward, he would reach a high position in the Army, was confidently predicted by those who had, in his youth, observed his outstanding qualities of mind and character. He impressed men by his quiet strength and steadfast purpose, his acute and penetrating intellect, his unwearied devotion to duty, his courtesy and charm of manner. Some idea of the estimate formed of him in high places is given by the following extracts from letters written by Generals and public men under whom and with whom he served.
"He was an exceptional man and a splendid staff officer. His division and all who knew him respected him greatly."
"To the Indian Corps he was invaluable. . . . He seemed assured of a career of great distinction. We can ill spare men of his worth."
"In him the Service has lost one of its most distinguished officers."
"His ability, his indefatigable love of work, and his devotion to his profession and scientific equipment for it, marked him out, had he been spared, for high eminence."
"The country has lost one of the very best officers we had. . . His grasp of broad principles was only excelled by his extraordinary mastery of detail. . . . His was a splendid character, including courage of the highest order, ceaseless perseverance, tact, and great ability."
We are authorised by Lieut.-Colonel Sir Maurice Hankey, K.C.B., Secretary of the Committee of Imperial Defence, to state that, in the years preceding the war, Colonel Longridge did invaluable work in connection with the arrangements for the preparation for war. The value of Colonel Longridge's work in this respect was fully recognised by the Prime Minister and the Committee of Imperial Defence, and was rewarded with a C.M.G. Nowhere is Colonel Longridge's death more deeply felt than in the Committee of Imperial Defence and among his colleagues in the Secretariat, who not only placed the highest value on his professional attainments, but were united to him by bonds of intimate friendship.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Photo of Richard Sackville Lovett-Thomas
2nd Lieut Richard Sackville Lovett-Thomas
House: No 4, 1911 - 1915. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 11 March 1917 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Hebuterne Mil Cemetery 111 Q 1

Son of L. H. Lovett-Thomas, Hillside, Broadstone. b. 1897.
Army II—I. House Scholar. House Prefect.
R.M.A. Woolwich ; 165th Bde. Royal Field Artillery 1915. M.C.

'He passed into Woolwich in 1915 and received his commission in the R.F.A. in the same year. In January 1916 he was sent with his brigade to Egypt, and to another front in the following March. For splendid services rendered on February 17th, 1917, when he kept up communication with a forward infantry report centre under the most difficult conditions, he was awarded the Military Cross, but the honour was not announced until after his death, which occurred on March 11th, from wounds received on that day while he was acting as officer in charge of the guns. Letters received from his brigade describe him as a very gallant soldier, invariably plucky and cheerful, and emphasise his manly worth, his exceptional ability, and his very lovable personality. "He was," writes his C.O. in reference to one particularly trying occasion, "just his bright cheerful-serious little self all the time." The words aptly hit off the nature of the boy, as we knew him.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Bideford Gazette 10th April 1917:
He proceeded to Egypt with his brigade in January, 1916, and to another front in the following March. His commanding officer writes:"I have lost my most efficient and best-loved officer. I cannot speak too highly of him, both as a gentleman and officer. For splendid services rendered to his country on the 17th of February, he was mentioned to those in higher command."

'Hebuterne. 11/3/17. HQ & Battery positions shelled. Casualties 2nd Lieut R S Lovett-Thomas 'C' Battery fatally injured. 1 OR wounded.' (Unit War Diary).
Northam remembered

Service record: WO 339/45693
Unit war diary: WO 95/2349/3

Photo of Sidney Evan Lowsley
Air Mechanic 1 Sidney Evan Lowsley
House: No 2, 1893 - 1896. Regiment: H. M. S. President.
Died: 27 September 1917 aged 38 in United Kingdom. Died in England while training.
Cemetery: Harrogate Harlow Hill H 190

Son of Dr. O. Lowsley, Eldon Square, Reading, b. 1879.
Ill—Upper IV. Shooting VIII.
Professional Associate, Surveyors' Institution ; Deputy Borough Engineer and Surveyor, Harrogate. Great War, Draughtsman R.N.A.S - H.M.S. "President." .
Died of illness contracted on service, September 27, 1917.

'After leaving school he took a special course of training as a Surveyor, and served his articles with the Borough Engineer at Wolverhampton. For fifteen years he was in the Harrogate Borough Engineer's Department, after being in the City Engineer's Office at Westminster and the Borough Engineer's Office at Lewisham. In July 1917 he joined the R.N.A.S. as a draughtsman. Whilst undergoing two months' training he contracted double pneumonia and pleurisy, and died on Sept. 27th. He was a prominent member of his Masonic Lodge, and in 1917 was the Principal of the Royal Arch Masons. His career at School was not marked by any outstanding incidents. He took a keen interest in rifle-shooting, and gained considerable distinction in this. He was an agreeable companion and a good friend, and was always ready to do what he could for the interests of his House and School.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Photo of Reginald Eric Lucy
Lieutenant Reginald Eric Lucy
House: No 1, 1907 - 1911. Regiment: Northamptonshire Regt..
Died: 19 March 1915 aged 22 in United Kingdom. Died of wounds near Neuve Chapelle.
Cemetery: Ford Park Plymouth

Son of Dr. Reginald Horace Lucy, M.B., F.R.C.S. (O.M.), and Emily Susan Lucy, of "Sunnymead," Abbotswood, Guildford and 9 The Crescent, Plymouth. b. 1893.
Army III—I. House Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; 2nd Bn. Northamptonshire Regt. 1913; Lieutenant 1914.

He returned home with his regiment from Egypt in October 1914, and went out to the front in November.

He was wounded in action on the 12th March 1915, at Neuve Chapelle, while attending to a wounded sergeant, and died on the 19th March, at No 7 Hospital, Boulogne-sur-Mer.
IWM

Photo of Richard Litton Lyster-Smythe
Captain Richard Litton Lyster-Smythe
House: No 2, 1911 - 1913. Regiment: Royal Air Force.
Died: 19 June 1919 aged 22 in Israel. Drowned near Jaffa.
Cemetery: Ramleh War Cemetery EE. 37.

Son of Colonel Lyster-Smythe, Barbavilla, Collinstown. b. 1897.
Lower IV—Matriculation Class.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Bn Gordon Highlanders ; Captain R.A.F.

'A keenness for all things engineering, and a thoroughly fearless disposition, marked him out for the Flying Corps. At first, however, he obtained a commission in the Gordon Highlanders, transferring later to the R.A.F., where he took part in the Palestine campaign and rose to the rank of Flight Commander. He was drowned, whilst bathing, at Jaffa, on June 19th.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

He was drowned while bathing at Jaffa.
Flight Global

Photo of Hugh Turner Macan
2nd Lieut Hugh Turner Macan
House: No 6, 1900 - 1905. Regiment: Middlesex Regt..
Died: 23 March 1918 aged 32 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 7

Son of Arthur and Mary Louisa Macan, Drumcashel, Castle Bellingham, Co. Louth, Ireland, b. 1886.
Lower Modern III—Lower Modern I. House Prefect.
Studied in Germany ; Farm Pupil in Canada.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 14th Middlesex 1915. 21st Bn. Middlesex Regiment.

Husband of Marguerite Evelyn Macan, of 124, Elgin Crescent, Holland Park, Notting Hill, London.

'On leaving School, he spent four years in Germany, and in 1910 went to Canada, where he spent some years learning farming and railway work. He returned home early in 1915, and joined the Trinity College, Dublin, O.T.C., receiving his commission in the Middlesex Regiment in due course. He was sent out to France in August 1916, and was wounded a month later , by a bomb, while on patrol duty . On recovery, he returned to France, and took part in much fighting, and, though only 2nd Lieutenant, replaced his Captain in the big offensive of 1917, being praised for his efficiency. He met his death on March 23rd, 1918, while gallantly leading his men. A simple story of a very simple-minded, wholesome type of boy and young man, who was universally liked and respected wherever he was, and whose watchword in life was duty.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Service record: WO 339/40561

Photo of Thomas Charles Stuart MacGregor
2nd Lieut Thomas Charles Stuart MacGregor
House: No 6, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Highland Light Infantry.
Died: 08 June 1917 aged 21 in France. Killed in action at Messines.
Battle: Battle of Messines. Cemetery: Arras Flying Services Memorial

Son of William Ord MacGregor, Hazaribagh, Chota Nagpur, India, and Ranchi, India b. 1896.
Upper Shell—Army I. School Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Highland L.I. 1914 ; R.F.C.

'His intention on leaving School was to go into business, but he joined up at once in the early autumn of 1914, and received a commission in the Highland L.I. Later he transferred to the R.F.C., and after the usual training went out to France where he was killed in action on June 8th. "His O.C. speaks in the highest terms of the gallantry displayed by the contact control which was shot down by direct hit. He was considered by the infantry to have done magnificent work in his endeavours to identify our line." As a schoolboy, Tom MacGregor was a boy of quiet studious ways, and never very prominent at games; popular in his House and in the School, and respected for his simple hearted honest nature.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

He joined the H.L.I. and was in the Ypres salient all the winter of 1915/16 and was wounded on May 10th 1916.
After three months leave he joined the R.F.C. and was sent to the front on May 9th. He was doing useful work when both he and his observer were killed in the air by a shell.Flight Global

There is a marble memorial to him at St Marks Church,Pennington in the New Forest.IWM

Photo of Eric James Bethune MacKenzie
Major Eric James Bethune MacKenzie
House: Day, 1895 - 1896. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 08 July 1916 aged 33 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Carnoy Military Cemetery D 25

Son of James and Jane Bethune MacKenzie, Daresbury, Malvern, b. 1883.
Junior School—III.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.F.A. 1903; Major 1916. 29th Bty. 42nd Bde. Royal Field Artillery
Great War, killed in action July 8, 1916.

Husband of Ethel F. MacKenzie, of "Daresbury," Great Malvern.

Photo of Keith Bethune MacKenzie
Captain Keith Bethune MacKenzie
House: Day, 1892 - 1896. Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders.
Died: 12 November 1914 aged 35 in Belgium. Killed in action near Ypres.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 3B

Born 1 Dec 1879, Shanghai, China. Son of James and Jane MacKenzie, Daresbury, Malvern.
Junior School — Upper IV.
Seaforth Highlanders (from Militia) 1901 ; Captain 1911; South African War 1900-02, Queen’s Medal with 5 Clasps: Saxe-Ernestine Order 1907.
Great War, attached Gordon Highlanders. Killed In action at Hooge near Ypres, November 12, 1914.

Husband of Louise Scott MacKenzie, of 14, Paulton Square, Chelsea, London.

He was killed instantly by a shell at Hooge near Ypres on the 12th November 1914

His recreations were golf and football, and he was a member of the Worcestershire Golf Club and Nairn Gold Club.
IWM
Tain Museum

Photo of Francis Julian Audley Mackworth
Major Francis Julian Audley Mackworth
House: No 4, 1891 - 1895. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 01 November 1914 aged 38 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Vieille Chapelle New Lacouture 1V D 10

Son of Colonel Sir Arthur Mackworth, Bt., C.B., R.E. b. 1876.
Shell—Army Side. House Scholar Chance Prize. School Prefect.
Scholar, Selwyn College. Cambridge; BA. (Jun. Opt.) 1898;
R.F.A. 1898; Major 1914; Staff College; West African Frontier Force 1904—08.
Great War, G.S.O.. Killed in action November 1, 1914 Despatches.

'A boy of considerable ability, "Sapper" Mackworth took a high place in the examination for Woolwich, but was rejected on the ground of insufficient height. However, he grew into a tall man at Cambridge, and passed into the army as a University candidate. Born of a family honoured in the services, he proved himself a keen soldier, graduated at the Staff College, and was serving in the present war (together with his schoolfellow, Capt. W. R. Reid) on the Artillery Staff of the 3rd Division. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was promoted Major on Oct. 30th. Two days later, ignorant of the honour he had won, he was mortally wounded by a splinter from a shell.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914).

Photo of John Nigel MacRae
Flight Lieutenant John Nigel MacRae
House: No 6, 1908 - 1910. Regiment: 83 Sq. R. A. F..
Died: 11 April 1918 aged 24 in France. Accidentally killed while flying in France.
Cemetery: Lapugnoy Military Cemetery V1 C 10

Son of Stuart and Ethel MacRae, Handley House, Newark, and Rhu Lodge, Tarbert, Loch Fyne, Argyllshire. b. 1894.
Middle IV A.
Nottinghamshire Yeomanry (T.F.) 1911.
Great War, mobilised 1914, transferred Black Watch ; Captain 83rd Sqdn. Royal Air Force

'At the outbreak of war he was in the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry, which he left shortly afterwards to join a battalion of the Black Watch. He had for a long time wished to fly, and in October 1915 he joined the R.F.C. He got his wings on February 1st , 1916, and went to France the following month for eight months. He was gazetted Flight Commander in January 1917, and, after instructing in England for fourteen months, again went to the front last March, and was killed on April 11th. A boy of kindly, generous disposition, he was extremely popular at School, and it is very clear from the accounts which have reached us that he proved himself an extremely efficient airman.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)
Flight Global

Photo of Charles Julian Mann
Lieutenant Charles Julian Mann
House: No 6, 1906 - 1911. Regiment: 13th Res' Regt. Cavalry.
Died: 03 October 1918 aged 26 in France. Killed in action in France near Prescelles.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Bellicourt Brit V1 M 10

Son of Sir Edward Mann, Bt., Thelveton Hall, Scole, Norfolk b. 1892.
Middle IV A—Upper Shell. School Prefect. XI Cricket 1910,11 ; Rackets Pair; Prichard Racket; XL Football.
Pembroke College, Cambridge.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Cavalry Reserve 1914 ; Lieutenant "C" Sqdn. 20th Hussars

'He was a distinguished member of the famous Eleven of 1910, and first string of a Rackets Pair which went far towards winning the Competition at Queen's. He himself won the Prichard Racket in 1911. On leaving School he matriculated, and spent three years at Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he was in the College Fifteen and Captain of the Cricket Eleven. At the outbreak of the war he obtained his commission from Cambridge, and was posted to the 13th Reserve Regiment of Cavalry, and first went on active service in the winter of 1915, when he joined the 14th Hussars in Mesopotamia and took part in the Kut Relief Force. After the fall of that town he had a severe attack of fever and dysentery, and was invalided home. In December 1917 he was transferred to the Hussars, and joined the regiment on active service in France. He was in the cavalry division which held-up the Germans in their March offensive, and was twice wounded. He took part in much cavalry work during the British offensive which began in July, and was killed in action on October 3rd. Such was his four years service. Fond of games, he was also a fine rider and game shot: and he was a sportsman in the truest sense of the word; frank, open, and chivalrous, he "played the game" in its real essence. His conception of duty was high, and he was among the first to see where it lay in August 1914. Always cheery and high-minded, his influence among his fellows was great, and there was no one with whom he came in contact who was not the better for knowing Charles Mann. By the many who knew him his loss will be felt very keenly.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Captain of Cricket XI at Pembroke College Cambridge. Brother of Frank Mann who captained England in all 5 tests against South Africa in 1922-23.Wisden

Service record: WO 339/34706

Photo of Thomas Edensor Laurie Marsh
Lieutenant Thomas Edensor Laurie Marsh
House: No 8, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Marines Light Infantry.
Died: 27 April 1916 aged 20 in Malta. Drowned on HMS Russell.
Cemetery: Malta Naval Cemetery P 36

Son of Fleet Surgeon H. E. Marsh, Edensor, Liss, Hants, b. 1896.
Modern III—Army I. House Prefect.
R.M.L.I. 1914.
Great War, lost on H.M.S. Russell, April 27, 1916.

'At School his bright and cheerful nature endeared him to those who knew him, and inspired a confidence that he would make an excellent officer. That this early promise was being fulfilled is borne out by the following extract from a letter written after his death: "His work and character were held in high esteem by those whose business it was to appreciate their value, and his loss is very sincerely regretted, especially amongst the senior officers." He lost his life in the sinking of H.M.S. Russell on April 27th.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Photo of Ambrose Marshall
2nd Lieut Ambrose Marshall
House: No 1, 1893 - 1894. Regiment: Herefordshire Regt..
Died: 15 April 1917 aged in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Bailleul Road East St Lauren Blagny IC 31

Son. Of George William Marshall, LL.D., Sarnesfield Court, Weobley.
Modern III—II.
Tea Planter in Ceylon.
Great War, Motor Ambulance Driver (overseas) 1914; 2nd 1st Bn. Herefordshire Regiment attd. 4th Bn. Bedfordshire Regiment. 1916. Killed in action April 15, 1917.

'When war broke out he was in Ceylon where he had been engaged in tea planting. He came home early in the war and volunteered as a motor ambulance driver for Lady Bagot's Hospital. Subsequently he joined Mrs. Stobart’s Red Cross contingent as an ambulance driver under the Serbian Relief Fund. In this capacity he served throughout the Serbian retreat, and finally was one of the party who tramped over the Albanian Mountains to Scutari. After returning to England to recuperate he trained for a commission, and in the autumn of 1916 was gazetted to the Herefordshire Regiment. In March last he was attached to the Bedford Regiment, with whom he was serving when killed.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Service record: WO 374/46192
Unit war diary: WO 95/3118/2

Photo of John Ralph Theodore Marsham
Lieutenant John Ralph Theodore Marsham
House: Sch, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 26 February 1919 aged 34 in United Kingdom. Died of pneumonia.
Cemetery: Winchester West Hill Old Cemetery 40 2927

Son of Rev. the Hon. John and Mrs. Marsham, of St. Clair, Seaford, Sussex, and St. Maur, Newton Abbot, b. 1885.
Middle IV—Middle Shell.
South African Police ; Farmer in Canada.
Great War, Private Strathcona's Horse 1914, 2nd Lieutenant 11th Bn. Worcestershire Regiment transf. to Labour Corps.
(overseas); severely wounded 1915 ; attached Hants Regt. Died at Winchester, February 26, 1919.

'Marsham had a varied life before the War. He was for a time in the South African Police, then in India, and finally engaged in farming in Canada. He enlisted as a Private in Strathcona's Horse, and soon obtained a commission in the 11th Worcesters. In October, 1915, he was very severely wounded in the right arm—a wound which caused him intense and prolonged pain and prevented him taking the field again. When he had to some extent recovered he joined up again and was attached to the Hampshire Regiment for work in connection with agriculture. He died of pneumonia, at Winchester, on February 26th, 1919.' (Malvernian, Nov 1919)

He served in 'D' Company of the 11th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Whilst training he was wounded by shelling at Maricourt, on the Somme river bank on the 7th October 1915. After he was wounded he was awarded the Silver War Badge and then served with the Labour Corps.

He married Olive Hill in 1918. He later died age 32 on the 27th February 1919, of pneumonia following on from his wounds.
Worcestershire regiment

Photo of John Martin
Captain John Martin MC
House: No 1, 1902 - 1906. Regiment: Gordon Highlanders.
Died: 09 April 1917 aged 29 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Cabaret Rouge Brit Cemetery Souchez XV11 J 4B

Born 28th November 1888. Son of James and Euphemia Carrick Barclay Martin, 10 Greenhill Park, Edinburgh.
Middle IV—Lower V. House Prefect. House XI Cricket and Football.
Edinburgh University ; B.A. (Honours in Law).
Solicitor.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant "A" Coy. 8th/10th Bn. Gordon Highlanders 1914 ; Captain.

'John Martin was one nothing can daunt. He of those cheerful, happy boys, whom took honours in Law at Edinburgh University and joined his father as a solicitor. In August 1914 he obtained a commission in the Gordon Highlanders, served for two years in the front line trenches, and was killed in the attack of April 9 when his regiment did so well. He had inspired his company with that confidence which only a brave man can do; their turnout and steadiness were admirable. He won the Military Cross (as already recorded) for the courage and ability with which he organised a trench raid. A keen, true-hearted sportsman in every way, he belonged to the best type of British Officer.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Service record: WO 339/11822

Photo of Roland Charles Mason
Lieutenant Roland Charles Mason
House: No 7, 1897 - 1899. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 30 September 1914 aged 32 in United Kingdom. Died of wounds received on the Aisne.
Cemetery: St Bartholomews Church Edgbaston WEST

Son of R. Mason, West Mount, Edgbaston. b. 1882.
Modern III—I.
In business ; 2nd Lieutenant Warwickshire R.A. (V.) ; retired ;
2nd Lieutenant 3rd Batt. N. Lancashire Regt. 1911.
Great War, mobilised 1914. Died at Netley, September 30, 1914, of wounds received at the battle of the Aisne.

'He was much attached to his old School, which he visited as often as he could. At school he was a keen member of the Artillery Corps, and on leaving to join his father's business he took a commission in the Warwickshire Artillery Volunteers. In that Corps he became a most keen and efficient officer, and finally gave up business and joined the Special Reserve, as it was his ambition to join the Regular Army. He belonged to the Loyal North Lancashire Regt., and with it went abroad with the first division of the British Expeditionary Force. He was at the Battle of Mons, and was subsequently wounded on September 14th at the Aisne, and brought home to Netley, where he died. It was found that the force of the German bullet had driven the metallic identity disc into his lungs.' (Malvernian, Nov 1914).

Photo of Ronald Erskine Wilford Maxwell
Major Ronald Erskine Wilford Maxwell
House: No 4, 1901 - 1905. Regiment: Kings Own Scottish Borderers.
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 29 in France. Killed in action at Loos.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Loos British Cemetery XV11 E 18

Son ofRalph W and Florence G Maxwell, c/o Grindlay & Co. b. 1886.
Shell—Lower VI. School Prefect. Ledbury Cap.
Exeter College, Oxford ; B.A. 1909 ; King's Own Scottish Borderers 1908 ; Captain 1915. Great War (overseas), with 6th Batt.
Killed in action at Loos, September 25, 1915.

'He was a boy of unaffected nature and a most engaging personality. A graduate of Exeter College, Oxford, he entered the Regular Army and was promoted Lieutenant in the K.O. Scottish Borderers in 1909. He became Captain in the Army in April last and served as temporary Major of the 6th Bn. from Dec. 1914. He was a keen soldier and (as his father writes) by falling in action met the death which he preferred. He was killed in France during the heavy fighting on Sept, 26th.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Medal card: WO 372/13/182931

Photo of Lawrence William McArthur
Flight Lieutenant Lawrence William McArthur M.C.
House: No 5, 1904 - 1907. Regiment: 12 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 27 May 1917 aged 27 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Harlebeke New Brit XV11 B 12

Son of William and Constance McArthur, of The Meadow, Chislehurst, Kent. b. 1890.
Middle Shell Lower V. XL Cricket.
In business; H.A.C.
Great War, mobilised 1914, Lieutenant; Captain 12th Sqdn. Royal Flying Corps and Honourable Artillery Company .
Killed in action May 27, 1917 ; M.C., Despatches (2).

'A member of the H.A.C. before the war, he left for the front with the first contingent in September 1914, and in June, 1915, was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery in an action, in which he was severely wounded (on June 16th near Hooge, Ypres). On recovery he entered the R.F.C. and since October, 1916, has been engaged at the front. He was mentioned in despatches twice and was gazetted Flight Commander last January. His School career was not marked by any striking performances owing perhaps to his leaving when only 17. His chief interest was in amateur carpentering—especially in the form of building models of boats, at which he showed special ability.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

He won the MC with the following citation:
'For conspicuous gallantry on June 16, 1915, at Hooge. When our troops were forced to retire from the third line of German trenches he rallied part of the retiring troops and reoccupied and held the vacated trench under heavy fire until he was himself forced later to withdraw owing to retirements on his flanks. He was severely wounded on this occasion.'

On the 9th May 1917, Captain Lawrence William McArthur MC & Lieutenant Joseph Senior were in a Sopwith Strutter A8226 and were attacked. During the fight they appeared to have driven down one of their attackers, but Senior was badly wounded in the stomach and had his hand partially severed. McArthur put the Strutter into a spin and returned to Baillieu aerodrome. Senior later died of his wounds. The victory was claimed by Vitzfeldwebel Witterkind from Jasta 28 but this was not confirmed.Airwar19141918

Brass plaque memorial at St Nicholas Church, Chislehurst.IWM

Service record: WO 374/43517

Photo of Robert Jim McCleverty
Captain Robert Jim McCleverty
House: No 7, 1897 - 1900. Regiment: 47th Sikhs (I.A.).
Died: 28 October 1914 aged 32 in France. Killed in action at Neuve Chapelle.
Cemetery: Neuve-Chapelle Memorial P 37

Son of Colonel J. McCleverty, Greycourt, Fleet, Hants, b. 1882.
Army III—I. Lambert German. House Prefect. House XI Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; West Riding Regt. 1901 ; Indian Army (47th Sikhs) 1903 ; Captain 1910 ; South African War 1901-02, Queen's Medal with 5 Clasps.
Great War, killed in action at Neuve Chapelle, October 28, 1914, Despatches.

'He was the third of four brothers here, all of whom later became members of the Indian Army. We print an extract from a letter written by his Commanding Officer, and it is sufficient to say of him that he died as he had lived—a soldier to the core and a type of all that is best in the British Officer. " He was killed in an attack on a village just after we had carried it with the bayonet. For the attack we were congratulated by Sir H. Smith-Dorrien for what he called 'magnificent behaviour'. Robert's leading all through was splendid, as cool as if engaged in manoeuvres, but inspiring all round him by his dash. He was killed close to me when leading the attack on through the village, killed instantaneously, shot through the head. I cannot express properly how all ranks in the Regiment grieve at his loss, the most popular of all and a splendid officer in every way." ' (Malvernian, Dec 1914)

Photo of Hugh Peter Egerton Mesnard Melly
2nd Lieut Hugh Peter Egerton Mesnard Melly
House: No 3, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Royal Lancaster Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 20 in France. Killed in action at the Somme.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Sucrerie Mil Cemetery Colincamps 1 H 11

Born: 6th October 1896. Son of Hon. Col. Hugh Mesnard Melly, V.D., and Eleanor Lawrence Melly, Quinta, Greenheys Road, Liverpool,
Army III—I.
Passed into R.M.C. Sandhurst, but did not enter.
Great War 2nd Lieutenant 1st Bn. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)

'From here he passed into Sandhurst, but war broke out just before he was due to join. He, therefore, chose to accept an offer of joining the Special Reserve of the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). He went out with a draft to France and was wounded in the foot on (27th) April, 1915 (at Ypres). Later on he received a commission and proceeded again to the front. He was killed on July 1st while leading his men on to assault the second line of German trenches. His Major writes: "He was very happy in his life in the Regiment. He was a brave, fearless and capable officer." ' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Killed in action at Serre on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

'Green Trench, near Serre. 1st July 1916. At 8.46am leading sections of the Batn advanced from the assembly area. Directly the advance commenced the Batn came under heavy machine gun fire and there seems no doubt that a large number of casualties occurred before reaching our own front line. The advance still continued, however, a large number of casualties being sustained in no man's land from both machine gun and shell fire. Only a small number of the two left companies reached the German front line.
2nd Lieut Melly was among the 7 officers killed in his battalion, and a further 13 officers were wounded. Only 120 men were left at the end of the day.' (Unit War Diary)

There is a memorial plaque at St John The Evangelist Church, Great Sutton, Ellesmere Port.IWM

Service record: WO 339/24244
Unit war diary: WO 95/1506/1

Photo of Reginald Ernest Melly
Captain Reginald Ernest Melly
House: No 4, 1902 - 1906. Regiment: Liverpool Regt..
Died: 30 July 1916 aged 28 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 1D, 8B. 8C

Son of Ernest Louis Melly (Solicitor) and Florence Melly, of Highbury Bank, Meriden, Coventry, b. 1888.
Middle IV—Matriculation Class. House XI Cricket and Football.
Solicitor 1911.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 20th Bn. King's Liverpool Regt. 1914, Captain.

'As a boy here he threw himself whole-heartedly into the life of the School; his influence was entirely for good, and by his attractive character he made and deserved many friends. His later life was of a piece with his boyhood. He volunteered for service at the beginning of the war and received a commission in a Battalion of the Liverpool Regt. in Feb 1915. He was promoted Lieutenant in May 1915, and for the last month of his service had the command of a company. He was killed in action on July 30th, while gallantly leading an attack. His Colonel speaks of him as having been an excellent officer, who was beloved by his men and whose services in command were invaluable.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

'He was a keen cricketer, and was well-known in Coventry and the Midlands as a left half hockey player, playing for Warwickshire and the Midlands, and later for Yorkshire and the North. He joined as a private in August, 1914, received his commission in February, 1915, and was promoted lieutenant in May, 1915. ' (Liverpool Echo, "Roll of Honour. Casualties In Local Battalions", 7th August 1916 )

Photo of Bertram Cecil Metcalfe-Smith
Lieutenant Bertram Cecil Metcalfe-Smith
House: No 5, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: West Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 22 April 1918 aged 24 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Cemetery: Pernes Brit Cemetery 1 D 13

Born 6 March, 1894, son of Reginald Metcalfe-Smith, 101 Eaton Terrace, S.W.
Middle IV—Lower Shell.
Trinity Hall, Cambridge.
Great War, Private Queen's Westminsters 1914 ; Lieutenant W. Yorkshire Regt.

'Bertram Metcalfe-Smith did not fill a great place in the School, but will be remembered by his House as a keen naturalist and a boy with many hobbies. He left Malvern early for a year with a Tutor, and afterwards went to Trinity Hall, joining the W. Yorks, Regt. early in the war. He was seriously wounded in April, and died a few days later at the Canadian Clearing Station, leaving a fine record as a good soldier who always did his duty.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

'Lieut., 4th (Extra Reserve) Battn. The Prince of Wales’s Own (West Yorkshire Regt.), only son of Reginald Metcalfe Smith, of Nunirons, Olney, co. Buckingham, by his wife, Kate Frances, 3rd daughter of the late Lieut.-Col. Bailey, 4th Battn. The Bedfordshire Regt.; born London, 6 March, 1894 educ. Parkfield, Haywards Heath; Malvern College, and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; joined the Queen’s Westminster Rifles 6 Aug. 1914; served with the expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from the following Nov.; was invalided home in Feb. gazetted 2nd Lieut. in the West Yorkshire Regt. 13 April, 1915; promoted Lieut. in 1917; returned to France in Dec. 1916, being shortly afterwards attached to the 21st Battn. The West Yorkshire Regt., and died at No. 4 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station 2 Apr11. 1918, from wounds received in action on the 18th of that month. Buried in the British Cemetery, Pernes, Pas-de-Calais. His Commanding Officer wrote: “Your son was a good soldier, always cool and cheerful in danger, and he was very popular with us all. We shall miss him greatly. He died a soldier’s death, with his duty well done, and you may be proud of him.”' (De Ruvigny)

Service record: WO 339/29814

Photo of Noel Burgess Michell
Captain Noel Burgess Michell
House: Sch, 1899 - 1904. Regiment: Royal Fusiliers.
Died: 22 March 1918 aged 33 in France. Killed in action at Jussy.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Pozieres Memorial P 19-21

Son of G. B. Michell, 11 Sackville Gardens, Hove. b. 1885.
Upper V—VI. House Scholar. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Major Scholar, Trinity College, Cambridge ; B.A. (First Class Class. Tripos) 1908 ;
Assistant Master at Lancing College and Bedales School.
Great War, Private Public Schools Batt. 1914, Captain Royal Fusiliers.
Killed in action March 12, 1918 ; Despatches.

'Noel Michell came to Malvern with a Scholarship in 1899. He was an interesting boy, of considerable ability, perhaps too independent and wayward to be very popular, but his character won respect, and he showed keenness for the House at football and otherwise. His Scholarship at Trinity, Cambridge, and his First Class in the Classical Tripos seemed to promise a successful career, and he did good work at Lancing and Bedales. When the crisis came, he obeyed the call to arms, and, like so many others, he has made the supreme sacrifice in the early promise of life.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

In a letter to The Editor of The Bedales Chronicle on 8th December 1915 he describes:
“This part of the line … is not one of the worst, except as far as mining goes. … Mining and counter-mining are perpetually going on, with the result that you never know when you and your men will be heaved up aloft or buried in the debris of an explosion. … Of course if you know where a mine is going off, you try not to be there, since, like hot-tempered teachers, they are apt to explode when you least expect them.”
He states the trenches which “in our sector of the line are habitually knee deep in mud”, and describes the rats, “of which unpleasant animals there are hundreds”. He is convinced that the British army is better fed and more supplied with ammunition than “the brutal Boche” and also has much more spirit, “joking and laughing all the time … from a profound lightness of heart, a sort of blessed cheeriness, which combined with their d.…d doggedness … will certainly win the war.”
Detailed biography at Bedales

Photo of Richard Gerald Milburn
2nd Lieut Richard Gerald Milburn
House: No 4, 1905 - 1912. Regiment: East Surrey Regt..
Died: 09 February 1915 aged 22 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Perth Cemetery China Wall 1V A 3

Born: August 24th 1893. Son of W. Milburn and Edith Jane Milburn, Stonewall Park, Edenbridge, Kent
Middle IV B—Matriculation Class. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; House XI Football.
Trinity College, Cambridge.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 4th Bn. Attd. 2nd Bn. East Surrey Regiment 1914.

'He received a commission in the 4th (Reserve) Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment in August 1914, In January last he was attached to the 2nd Battalion at the front, and fell in action on February 9th. A type of the care-free schoolboy, he was the friend of everyone, but the depth of his affectionate nature could best be realised by those who knew him in the intimacy of his home, in which he will be terribly missed.' (Malvernian, March 1915).

Unit War Diary extract:
'Kruisstrat-Ypres
9.2.15 Battalion was employed in carrying rations and water to the trenches. During this 2nd Lieut R. G. Milbank was wounded and subsequently died of wounds.'

Service record: WO 339/17052
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2279/1

Photo of Mansfield (Mansfeldt) Charles Nightingale Mills
2nd Lieut Mansfield (Mansfeldt) Charles Nightingale Mills
House: Sch, 1905 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 29 December 1915 aged 24 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Cite Bonjean Armentieres 1XD 72

Born: February 9th 1891. Son of Mansfeldt Henry and Emily Frances Mills, of 34, Kingsnorth Gardens, Folkestone Kent, and 8 Barn Park Terrace, Teignmouth.
Upper IV A—Upper Shell.
Birmingham University.
Mining Engineer; in Tin Mines Northern Nigeria.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers.
Killed in action, December 29, 1915.

'He was by profession a mining engineer, and at the outbreak of the war was engaged in tin mines in Northern Nigeria. He then accepted a commission in the Royal Engineers. His Company Commander writes: "Speaking as Officer Commanding this Company I do not think it would have been possible to have had a more capable and reliable fellow in every way. He will be very very difficult to replace. ' (Malvernian, Mar 1916).
Marble memorial at St Margaret’s church, Cliffe

Service record: WO 339/36049

Photo of Douglas Owen Milner-Moore
Captain Douglas Owen Milner-Moore
House: No 1, 1898 - 1902. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 23 April 1918 aged 33 in Africa. Died at Mombasa.
Battle: East African Campaign. Cemetery: Mombasa (Mbaraki) Cemetery I. O. 7.

Son of Dr. Milner-Moore and Caroline Marie M. Moore, of 81, Hartfield Terrace, Eastbourne, and The Quadrant, Coventry, b. 1885.
Modern II—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. House XI Cricket and Football.
Engineer in India.
Great War (overseas), Captain Royal Engineers attd. East African Railways (Railway Corps.)
Died at Nairobi, March 1918.

District Superintendent on Bombay and Baroda Railway.

Died at the British Base hospital, Mombasa of Tropical abscess of the liver and peritonitis.

Service record: WO 374/48530

Photo of Stephen Christopher Lay Moore
Private Stephen Christopher Lay Moore
House: No 4, 1895 - 1899. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 31 May 1916 aged 36 in France. Died of wounds received at Bailleul.
Cemetery: Wimereux Communal 1 N 2

Son of S. Moore, Stratford-on-Avon. b. 1880.
Lower IV—Matriculation Class.
Hertford College, Oxford ;
Secretary, Canadian Northern Railway, Medical Department.
Great War, Private 29th Bn. Canadian Infantry 1914.

'On leaving School he went to Hertford College, Oxford. Subsequently he proceeded to Canada and became Secretary in the Medical Department of the Canadian Northern Railway. He served in the war as a Private in the Canadian Infantry, and died on May 31st of wounds received on April 6th.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Photo of William Henry Helme Moore
Lieutenant William Henry Helme Moore
House: No 3, 1909 - 1914. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 19 October 1915 aged 20 in France. Accidentally killed while training at Fleurbaix.
Cemetery: Royal Irish Rifles Graveyard Lavente 1 J 12

Son of Arthur Lewis Moore and Sara Chambers Moore, of "Hill Ree", The Warren, Radlett. Born in London, Sept 1st 1895.
Middle Shell—Science I. School Prefect.
Magdalen College, Oxford.
Great War, Lieutenant 10thKing's Royal Rifle Corps
Accidentally killed October 19, 1915.

'He was killed accidentally at the Bombing School at Fleurbaix on October 19th. His Colonel wrote that he had been selected to go through this course as being one of his most promising young officers, and one who if called upon would never fail. A Sergeant of his platoon wrote of him: "The men thought the world of him, and given the chance would have followed him as their leader to the end, no matter what that end might be. I cannot find words to properly explain how the men and myself do feel." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

'Apparently 2nd Lieut Moore was handling a G.S. Grenade and probably tapped it with his hand causing explosion. Moore killed and all others more or less seriously injured and suffering from shock and not in fit state to give any information.' (Telegram to A.A.G. 1st Army, 19th Oct 1915, from 20th Division)

There is a memorial to him at Christ Church, Roman Rd, Radlett, Hertsmere, Hertfordshire.

Service record: WO 339/31859

Photo of Norman Archibald Morice
Lieutenant Norman Archibald Morice
House: No 7, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 11 March 1916 aged 22 in France. Died of wounds at Boulogne.
Cemetery: Boulogne East 2 A 1

Born: April 13th 1894. Son of William Stewart Morice (O.M.), and Laura Morice, of 8, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London, and 5 Avenue Mansions, Willesden Green. Native of Ricksmanworth, Herts.
Lower IV—Lower Modern I. School Prefect. XI Cricket; XI Football 1912,13 ; Ledbury Cap.
In business.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 7th Bn. East Yorkshire Regiment. 1914 Lieutenant.

'Norman Morice, like all the members of his family, entered with the keenest zest into all branches of school life. A good worker, of a disposition which endeared him to everybody, masters as well as boys, good at games, he will be mourned by all with whom he came in contact. He was at home on leave only a few weeks ago, and seemed most keen on his adopted profession. Very soon after his return he was seriously wounded, but his letters were cheerful and bright, and made light of his injuries, so that all his friends were unprepared for the sad news of his death. He was a keen member of the Choir, having, when he first came, a very good treble voice. He sang many solos in Chapel and at School Concerts. He was intended for a business career, but on the outbreak of war joined the 7th Bn. E. Yorks Regt., in which regiment we learn from his Colonel he was one of the most promising officers.' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

On 23rd November 1915, he was admitted to St John's Hospital, Etaples with Influenza.
On 27th February 1916, he was severely wounded with a gunshot wound to the right thigh and compound fracture, and he died on the 11th March 1916 at No 7 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne.

Service record: WO 339/24366
Unit War Diary for March, not Feb 1916: WO 95/2002/1

Photo of Charles Philip Scott Morris
Private Charles Philip Scott Morris
House: No 2, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 06 June 1916 aged 30 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 24, 28, 30

Son of Dr. Charles Edward and Elizabeth Morris, of Campden, Glos., and London, Ontario, b. 1886.
Ill—Middle IV B.
Settled in Canada.
Great War, Private 31st Bn. Canadian Infantry. Killed in action, June 6, 1916.

Photo of John Torrington Morris
2nd Lieut John Torrington Morris
House: No 1, 1909 - 1913. Regiment: Royal Welch Fus..
Died: 15 May 1915 aged 19 in France. Killed in action at Festubert.
Battle: Battle of Festubert. Cemetery: Guards Cemetery Windy Corner Cuinchy 1V G 18

Son of Sir Robert Morris, Bt., Sketty Park, Glamorgan, b. 1896.
Lower IV—Army II. XL Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; 1st Bn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers 1914.
Great War, killed in action May 15, 1915.

He was examining an automatic pistol and received a gun shot wound in the left thigh on 29th Jan 1915 at Rouen whilst in the 3rd Battalion.
He embarked back into the field on 19th March 1915, and was transferred on the 26th March 1915 to the 1st Battalion.

Below is an extract from the Unit War Diary:
'Operations against Aubers Ridge & Festubert.
15th May. The Battalion formed up along the parapet on the Rue Chilloux.
The Battalion was ordered to assault the German trenches to its immediate front, take the German 1st & 2nd Lines and then move S.E. & take up a line between the Rue Quinque & the Rue D'Ouvert.
At 3.15am, the battalion assaulted and suffered very heavily from shell & machine gun fire both in crossing the parapet and the space between our parapet and the 1st German line. The CO of the Battalion Lt Col Gabbatt and the OC of B Coy were killed at once. The 2nd in command Major G F Dickson, the OC C Coy Lt Chapman & the OC D Coy all fell severely wounded together with many officers NCOs & men. The German first line was however quickly stormed, and the 2nd line was also quickly carried, and the line pushed on. A heavy M.G. & rifle fire then opened from the left front.
He was one of 8 officers killed out of an initial 25. 559 Other Ranks out of an initial 806 were casualties.'

Service record: WO 339/22667
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1665/1

Photo of Gerald Arthur Morton
Captain Gerald Arthur Morton
House: No 5, 1892 - 1893. Regiment: Border Regt..
Died: 02 May 1915 aged 40 in Turkey. Killed in action at Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Pink Farm Cemetery Helles SP MEM 70

Son of Colonel J. F. Morton, The Garden House, Mildmay Park, N. b. 1875.
Army Side.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Welch Regt. 1896; Border Regt. 1896; Captain 1906.
Great War, killed in action in Gallipoli May 2, 1915;
Despatches (2). 1st Bn. Border Regiment

Medal card: WO 372/14/114064
87 Brigade war diary: WO 95/4311

Photo of John Henry Moxon
Corporal John Henry Moxon
House: Day, 1910 - 1910. Regiment: Australian Infantry.
Died: 02 July 1918 aged 23 in France. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Vignacourt British 11 E 3

Son of W. Moxon, M.D., West View, Matlock, b. 1895.
Lower IV.
Great War, Private 60th Bn. Australian Infantry.
Died of wounds July 2, 1918.

Photo of Gordon Mucklow
Private Gordon Mucklow
House: No 2, 1906 - 1910. Regiment: Canadian Inf..
Died: 27 September 1918 aged 26 in France. Killed in action near Cambrai.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Quarry Cemetery Marquion C 8

Born Aug. 28, 1892. Son of Edward and Mabel M. Mucklow, Wood Hill, Bury, Lancs,
Lower Modern II—Modern I.
Ontario Agricultural College 1911-15.
Farming in Britkh Columbia.
Great War, Private No. 3 Coy. 7th Bn. Canadian Infantry 1914.

'At School he was a very conscientious boy, who could always be relied on to do his best in anything that he undertook either in work or games. He did not reach any position of authority here, but by his example and by his force of character he exercised a sound influence on those with whom he was brought into contact. We have no record of his life in Canada or of his service in the Army, but we can be quite sure that the high principles which guided him when he was at School were constantly maintained throughout his career.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

'After being rejected several times owing to defective eyesight, he was accepted for service in October 1917, when he joined the British Columbia Regiment, in which he was later promoted Corporal. After reverting in rank he joined the 7th Battalion in France on August 20th, 1918. A month later he was killed in action as the battalion was advancing across open ground at Haynecourt near Cambrai.' (University of Toronto / Roll of Service 1914-1918)
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Photo of Basil Muir
2nd Lieut Basil Muir
House: No 3, 1911 - 1914. Regiment: Worcestershire Regt..
Died: 16 June 1915 aged 19 in Belgium. Killed in action in Flanders.
Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 34

Son of J. J. Muir. b. 1896.
Upper IV B—Science I. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket; XXII Football; Fives Pair. Cadet Officer.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 6th Bn. attd. 3rd Bn Worcestershire Regt. 1914.

'He left us only last Christmas. Here he earned the respect and affection of all who knew him by the genuine simplicity of his character and a certain natural dignity. He was not one of those to whom a soldier's career would in itself be likely to make any great appeal, but a high sense of duty impelled him to try, despite his short sightedness, to obtain a commission. This he gained in the 6th (Reserve) Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment. He went to the front in March with the 3rd Battalion, and was killed in action in Flanders on June 6th.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

Unit War Diary extract of 16th June 1915:
'The orders to the Battalion were to support and consolidate the positions gained by the 9th Inf. Bde. in the captured trenches about “Y” wood and to the North of Hooge, and help them consolidate. After an examination of the position had been made, it was decided that immediate support was not necessary. After the assault by the 9th Inf. Bde. The 7th Inf. Bde. Had orders to occupy their assembly trenches and this was done. The H.A.C. at once followed the battalions Royal Fusrs. And 1st Lincs. And helped them to consolidate, but after communication with them in captured trenches it was found that immediate support to the H.A.C. which had been ordered, was not necessary, so battalion remained in the assembly trenches vacated by the 9th Inf. Bde., remaining there under heavy shell fire, and a good many casualties occurred. [Killed: Capt EW Buckler, Lt B Muir, Lt RN Loring; Wounded 11 officers. Rank and File: Killed 30, Wounded 255, Missing 24 TOTAL 309] '

Photo of Richard Walter Mullins
Captain Richard Walter Mullins
House: No 7, 1907 - 1910. Regiment: York and Lancaster Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 23 in France. Killed in action at Fricourt.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Gordon Dump Cemetery Ovillers La Boiselle 11 Q 5

Son of J. H. Mullins, Rosapenna, Llanishcn, Cardiff, b. 1893.
Modern III—Science Form.
In business.
Great War, Private 11th Batt. Welch Regt. 1914 ; Captain 10th York and Lancaster Regt. Killed in action at the Somme, July 1, 1916.

'On the outbreak of war he joined the Cardiff "Pals" as a private, and after three months was given a commission in the York and Lancaster Regiment. He went to France in 1915, and fought in the battle of Loos, after which he was promoted to the rank of Captain. He was invalided home in December, and went to the front again in May. ' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Photo of George Angus Murray
Captain George Angus Murray
House: No 2, 1907 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Engineers.
Died: 06 October 1918 aged 25 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Marcoing Communal 12

Son of Hon. H. Murray, C.I.E., C.B.E., Morleys, Henfield, Sussex, b. 1893.
Lower Shell—Army I. House Prefect. XXII Football; House XI Cricket.
Engineer.
Great War 1914, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers attd. 310th Bde. Royal Field Artillery, Captain.

Widow: Violet Alys Murray.

'George Murray will be remembered by many of his own time at Malvern as a happy-natured boy who had many friends and took an active part in the general life of the School. He did specially good service to his House in the football field, particularly under his elder brother's leadership. He had sufficient ability to enable him to reach a good place in the School. He worked for some time with a view to the India Woods and Forests Service, in which his father held a distinguished position, but a change in the regulations for admission to that service brought about a change of plans, and during the latter part of his time at School he was on the Army Side, preparatory to admission to Sandhurst. But he ultimately took up engineering, and when war broke out he was given a commission in the Royal Engineers. He did good service in France, and had the satisfaction of taking part in the recent triumphs of the Allied Armies.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Service record: WO 339/29382

Photo of Patrick Hallam Murray
Captain Patrick Hallam Murray
House: No 2, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 24 in France. Killed in action near Neuve Chapelle.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Loos Memorial P 3

Son of Sir Hugh Murray, CLE., Morleys, Henfield, Sussex, and Bramble Hill Lodge, Lyndhurst, Hants b. 1891.
Army III—I. School Prefect. Head of House. XI Cricket; XI Football. Cadet Officer.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.F.A. 1911 ; 61st Bty. 131st Bde. Royal Field Artillery; Captain 1915.
Great War, killed in action at Neuve Chapelle, September 25, 1915; Despatches (2).

'He went to France with the Expeditionary Force in August, 1914, serving throughout the war until the day of his death in action. Originally appointed to the 46th Field Battery, he served during the early part of the war as orderly officer to the colonel of the brigade, and was subsequently transferred to J Battery, R.H.A., and later to the 61st Battery, R.F.A.
On the morning of September 25th, near Neuve Chapelle, whilst accompanying the advancing troops in order to find a new observing station for his guns, he was mortally wounded by a shell and was left behind during the subsequent retreat. He was mentioned in despatches in connection with the first battle of Ypres.
All who knew him when he was at Malvern will remember his radiant cheerfulness, his keen sense of humour, his readiness to help those who needed help, and his enthusiastic interest in the general life of the School. At the front he endeared himself to his Commanding Officer and to his men, by whom he has been spoken of with real affection.' (Malvernian, Dec 1915).

Photo of William Leslie Murray
2nd Lieut William Leslie Murray
House: Sch, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: 2 FTS RAF.
Died: 26 October 1918 aged 18 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed.
Cemetery: St Germain Marske In Cleveland E 29

Son of C. F. Murray, 77 Barrowgatc Road, Chiswick. b. 1898.
Shell—Lower Modern I.
Great War (overseas), 2nd Lieutenant R.F.C. and 2nd Flying Training Schools Royal Air Force .
Accidentally killed October 26, 1918.

Photo of Robert Percy Nathan
Captain Robert Percy Nathan MC
House: Sch, 1907 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 21 March 1918 aged 25 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: German Spring Offensive. Cemetery: Ham British Cemetery, Muille Villette 1 E 19

Born 23rd March 1893. Son of Benjamin Arthur and Rosina Nathan, 36 Glenloch Road, N.W. and 22, Belsize Park, London.
Lower V—Lower VI. House Prefect. XXII Cricket.
Stock Exchange.
Great War, Private H.A.C. 1914; Captain 36th T.M. Bty. Royal Field Artillery
Killed in action March 21, 1918 ; M.C., Despatches.

'Percy Nathan was a boy who was much liked at school: he was trustworthy and sensible, with ability above the average, and showed promise as a cricketer. His school career was blameless, and his influence was always good. And he had character.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

He died of wounds received in action at No 61 Casualty Clearing Station, France.

Service record: WO 339/37484
Unit war diary (9th Bn Royal Fusiliers - wrong) : WO 95/1857

Photo of Urmstone Shaw Naylor
Major Urmstone Shaw Naylor
House: Sch, 1892 - 1896. Regiment: Durham Light Inf..
Died: 03 September 1916 aged 38 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 4C

Son of F. A. Naylor, Central Provinces, India, b. 1878.
Lower IV—Army Side. School Prefect. XI Football; House XI Cricket.
Indian Police 1898 (United Provinces).
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 13th Bn. Durham Light Infantry 1914 ; Major attached 6th Bn. Royal Irish Regt. Despatches.

Married Charlotte Pope Paterson on October 12th 1904 at St James Church, West Derby, Liverpool Born 19th January 1881, and had five children.

The Times:
'Major Urmstone Shaw Naylor who was killed in action on September 3, received a commission in the Durham Light Infantry when war was declared. In April 1916 he was attached to the Royal Irish Regiment as second in command. His Colonel writes: "I am indeed proud to have had such a splendid officer and good comrade under my command. His loss to me at this juncture is a most serious one."'

The following is from the Unit War Diary:
'Guillemont. 3rd September 1916. At 12.25pm the Bn advanced to the attack on Guillemont and Sunken Road, which latter was the final objective. The Bn went over the parapet with the pipes playing & the men went forward in excellent order. The final objective was in our hands by about 3pm and the line was at once consolidated & held in spite of three counter-attacks.
The casaulties in the days fighting were heavy, being 14 officers & 311 O.R.
Major U.S. Naylor, 2/Lt Magill & 2/Lt Downing killed in action.'

Service record: WO 339/37535
Unit Diary: WO 95/1970/3

Photo of Reginald Henry Neill
Lieutenant Reginald Henry Neill
House: No 6, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Irish Regt..
Died: 01 July 1916 aged 22 in France. Killed in action at Thiepval.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 15A 15B

Born: 16th September 1894. Son of Reginals Neill (O.M.) and Geraldine Neill, of "Sheena", Craigavad, Co. Down., and Collin Grove, Dunmurry, co. Antrim.
Modern II—I. Chance Prize. House Prefect.
Stockbroker.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 11th Royal Irish Rifles 1914, Lieutenant.

'Reginald Neill was the son of R. Neill (O.M,), of Dunmurry, Co. Antrim. He rapidly made his way to the top of the Modern Side, and won the Chance Prize. On leaving School he became a stockbroker, and when war broke out he obtained a commission in the 11th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles. He was in action at the battle of the Somme (July 1st, 1916), and was reported Missing, His father has never been able to obtain any news of what happened to him. To him we extend our sincere sympathy in the loss of a son of proved merit and capacity.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919).

The unit war diary states that their attack was initially successful but their flanks were exposed and the Germans heavily counter-attacked. The remnant of the battalion who went to attack in the morning at 7.30am returned to their trenches at 11.45pm with only 4 officers and 250 men.

''The Lieutenant was in B Coy, 2nd in command and took over when Captain Craig was wounded. I saw Lt Neil wounded at Thiepval on July 1st 1916; he was in a communication trench between the first and second German lines. He was lying down; his wound had been dressed; we held the ground. It was being heavily shelled all day.' (Informant L/Cpl M. Griffin)

There is a memorial plaque in St John the Baptist Church of Ireland Church, Suffolk, Belfast.
Photograph and small biography at IWM
Biography and details of Memorial plaque

Service record: WO 339/14586
Unit War Diary: WO 95/2506/1

Photo of Hugh Hathorn Nicholson
2nd Lieut Hugh Hathorn Nicholson
House: Sch, 1897 - 1901. Regiment: Cheshire Regt..
Died: 25 May 1915 aged 31 in Belgium. Killed in action.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate 19-22

Born: 16th July 1883. Son of Hugh Nicholson (Cotton Broker) and Margaret Gifford Nicholson (formerly Broadfoot), Sutton Hall, Little Sutton, Cheshire,
Lower IV—Middle V.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 2nd Bn. Cheshire Regt.

'Ypres, 24th May. 4am. Battalion proceeded to Ypres (from Brandhoek) following line of railway south of town and thence into trenches in square I 10 (Sheet 28 1/40000) from which an attack was made on enemy trenches about midnight. Battalion was subjected to a withering shell fire in the morning while advancing over open ground.
11pm 25th May. Battalion relieved and returned to Brandhoek.
Casualties: 5 officers (including Nicholson) and 8 other ranks.' (Unit Way Diary)

Service record: WO 339/508
Unit war diary: WO 95/2276/2

Photo of Richard Jefferys Nicolls
Captain Richard Jefferys Nicolls
House: No 4, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Sherwood Foresters.
Died: 01 October 1916 aged 22 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Peake Wood Cemetery Fricourt

Son of Rev. E. R. J. Nicolls, Trowell, Nottingham, b. 1894.
Upper V—VI. Lea Scholar. Reading Prize. School Prefect. Head of House. Champion Athlete. XXII Cricket.
Exhibitioner, Hertford College, Oxford.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Sherwood Foresters 1914 ; Captain 11th Batt.

'He had been a year at Oxford when he volunteered for the war and received his commission in the Sherwood Foresters in September 1914. In July 1915 he went to Gallipoli and was severely wounded in action after the landing at Suvla Bay, in which he took part. He left England for another front last March, saw much fighting and was promoted Captain in July. Letters from officers in his Battalion testify to his courage and cheeriness, his regardlessness of self, and his admirable control of his company. It was while he was looking after his men in some captured trenches "won thanks to his leading," that he was killed by a sniper's bullet on October 1st.
In his early years at Malvern a sensitive nature and a certain veil of irony concealed the independence of view, force of will, and strength of character which came out later, when as Head of his House and as Champion Athlete he occupied a prominent position in the School. Intellectually, his abilities were not such as would have attained great success in the schools, but he had read widely in English and was genuinely fond of literature. He had a fastidious taste in music and possessed a well-trained and pleasing voice. There was in his speech and writing a humorous and epigrammatic quality which was the delight of his friends. To them he was unswervingly loyal; where his affection was enlisted, it knew no reserves. On all those who were privileged to share it the sense of loss weighs heavily.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Photo of Norris Heatley Noble
2nd Lieut Norris Heatley Noble
House: No 5, 1910 - 1914. Regiment: Kings Royal Rifle Corps..
Died: 15 August 1916 aged 19 in France. Died of wounds received at Abbeville.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Abbeville Communal V1 H 3

Son of H. Noble, Temple Combe, Henley-on-Thames, b. 1897.
Middle IV A—Army I.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; K.R.R.C. 1915.

'Norris Heatley Noble was a member of No. 5 from 1910-14, when he left for a short stay with an Army Tutor preliminary to Sandhurst. He was at the R.M.C. for the first few months of the war, commissioned to the King's Royal Rifle Corps in March 1915, and was wounded in an attack and counter-attack on July 27th, and again on the way to the dressing-station. For a time he seemed likely to recover, but he died on August 15th, much regretted by his fellow officers and men. He left School too young to have made his mark, but will be remembered by his generation as the embodiment of good temper and good humour in all the changing fortunes of daily life.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Photo of Harold Mitford Norsworthy
2nd Lieut Harold Mitford Norsworthy
House: Sch, 1900 - 1902. Regiment: East Kent Regt. (The Buffs).
Died: 18 March 1917 aged 31 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Maroc British Cemetery Grenay 1 P 4

Son of William Milford Norsworthy and Henrietta Threlfall Eve, Yealmpton, Plymouth, b. 1886.
Ill—Shell.
Artist.
Great War, Private Public Schools' Batt. 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant The Buffs 1916.
Husband of Ernestine Norsworthy (nee Evans), of 14, Trafalgar Studios, Manresa Rd., Chelsea, London.

'Owing to ill-health he left School early and was sent to St. Ives, Cornwall, where he met many artists and took up art. After a short time at Bushey he came under the influence of Mr. Augustus John, Mr. Frank Brangwyn, R.A., and the late Mr. Swan, R.A. During a visit to Liverpool he made many drawings in sepia of the Cathedral while it was in course of construction, a number of them being exhibited in the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, and at the various exhibitions in London. A large landscape of his, "The Vista," which showed the good use he had made of four winters passed in Italy, was hung in last year's Royal Academy. At the outbreak of war he joined the Public Schools Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, and spent the winter of 1915-16 in the trenches, gaining sergeant's stripes. He obtained a commission in the Buffs, and was killed in action four weeks after returning to the front.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Photo of Charles Francis Nunneley
Lieutenant Charles Francis Nunneley
House: No 5, 1897 - 1900. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 06 October 1914 aged 31 in France. Killed in action at Neuve Chapelle.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial P 5/6

Son of Rev. F. B. Nunneley M.A., M.D., and Mrs. Nunneley. b. 1883.
Ill—Lower Modern I.
Royal West Kent Militia ; Northumberland Fusiliers (retired) ; Secretary North Eastern Agricultural Society 1911.
Great War, re-joined 3rd Bn Northumberland Fusiliers attd. King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry and then 1st Bn Northumberland Fusiliers. Killed in action at Neuve Chapelle, October 26, 1914, Despatches.

Husband of Edith Margery Mansfield (now The Hon. Mrs. J. E. Svensson, of "Ashgarth," Wallington, Surrey).

His Commanding Officer wrote: 'Lieutenant Nunnely met his death as follows at Neuve Chapelle on the 26th October 1914. The enemy had captured a trench in which was a gun. He attempted to recapture the trench by crawling through a wire fence, which was about thirty yards from the enemy. His men got hung up in the wire, and Lieutenant Nunneley calmly stood up, encouraging and directing them regardless of all personal risks, and was shot at close quarters by the enemy.’
Detailed biography at IWM

Photo of John Cecil Nunneley
Lance Corporal John Cecil Nunneley
House: No 5, 1894 - 1897. Regiment: Highland Light Infantry.
Died: 28 April 1917 aged 37 in France. Killed in action in France.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: Arras Memorial BAY 8

Son of W. Nunneley, Buckingham Villa, Weston-super-Mare. b. 1880.
Modern IV—Lower Modern I. School Prefect. XI Football 1895-97 (captain); House XI Cricket.
Brewer; Secretary St. Augustine's Golf Club 1908-14.
Great War, Private Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders ; Corporal 2nd Battalion Highland Light Infantry.
Husband of Mrs. H. Nicholls (formerly Nunneley), of 59, Vicarage Rd., Eastbourne.

'He was trained as a Brewer, and when duly qualified, held various posts till his marriage in 1908. He was a first-class golfer with a handicap of plus 2. After his marriage he became Secretary of the St. Augustine's Golf Club. This post he held at the outbreak of war. After doing good work with the Red Cross he enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In December, 1916, he was transferred to the 2nd Highland L.I. as Lance-Corporal, and went with them to France. On April 28th, 1917, he was posted Missing, and it has been impossible to obtain any details as to his fate. He leaves a widow and two sons, to whom we offer our deepest sympathy.' (Malvernian, Dec 1919)

Photo of Alexander Walter Ogilvie
Lieutenant Alexander Walter Ogilvie
House: Sch, 1897 - 1901. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 30 October 1918 aged 35 in United Kingdom. Died of pneumonia after gas poisoning.
Cemetery: St Andrews Aldingham Suffolk

Son of G. S. Ogilvie, The Lodge, Woodbridge. b. 1883.
Lower IV—Upper V. House Prefect.
University College, Oxford ; B.A. (Third Class History) 1904 ;
Engineer.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Army Service Corps, transferred 60th Siege Bty. Royal Garrison Artillery. Died of gas-poisoning, October 30, 1918.

Husband of Annie Culver (formerly Ogilvie), of The Chase, Weybridge, Surrey. M.A. (Oxon.).

'Alexander Ogilvie went up to University College, Oxford, took Honours in History, and subsequently studied Engineering. He obtained a commission in the A.S.C., and afterwards transferred to the 47th Siege Battery, R.G.A. In his last action, when he was in command of a battery, an accident at a difficult corner prevented him from getting the last of his six guns into position. Just then the Germans sent over volumes of gas. With the regulation gas helmet it was impossible to give orders. Rather than sacrifice his infantry by being one gun short, Ogilvie deliberately took off his mask, and succeeded in getting the gun into action before he collapsed. He was brought blinded and unconscious to England, where he succumbed to pneumonia, on October 30th.' (Malvernian, Feb 1919).

Photo of Charles Gordon Oliver
2nd Lieut Charles Gordon Oliver
House: No 7, 1903 - 1907. Regiment: Devon Regt..
Died: 15 October 1915 aged 25 in France. Killed in action in France.
Cemetery: Chocques Mil Cemetery 1 F 11

Born: 25th April 1890. Son of Edgar Oliver, Redgate, Exmouth.
Middle Shell—Remove. XI Football 1905,06.
In Canada.
Great War, 1914. 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Bn. Devonshire Regiment attd. 2nd Bn Yorkshire Regiment

Was in the Malay States Rifles before the war.
Married Sybil Violet Leona Mainwaring at the Church of St Mary, Kuala Lumpa on January 1st 1914.

Died at No 1 Casualty Clearing Station from wounds received in action (G.S.W Both Legs & Hands).

Service record: WO 339/5431
Medal card: WO 372/15/52117

Photo of Henry Du Bois O
Captain Henry Du Bois O'Neill MC
House: No 1, 1889 - 1889. Regiment: Bedfordshire Regt..
Died: 02 June 1918 aged 43 in United Kingdom. Died of illness contracted on active service.
Cemetery: Bexhill Cemetery E G A86

Son of Henry Edward O'Neill, Pinehurst, Heathfield. b. 1815.
Modern III.
Bedfordshire Regt. (from Militia) 1896; Captain 1902; retired 1908; East Africa 1901—02, Despatches (2), Medal with Clasp; entered service of Colonial Office 1908; Assistant District Commissioner Uganda, 1910.
Great War, re-joined Bedfordshire Regt; Major Middlesex Regt.; M.C. Died of illness contracted on active service, June 2, 1918.

Husband of Margaret Theodora O'Neill.

Citation to Military Cross: 'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in making a most daring personal reconnaissance of the enemy's wire. Accompanied by an N.CO, and two runners, he crawled through a gap in the wire and got in rear of the enemy's post. Finding it occupied by two of the enemy, he shot them in the legs with his revolver and took them both prisoners. He set a fine example of initiative and gallantry to his battalion'.

Photo of Arthur Denzil Onslow
2nd Lieut Arthur Denzil Onslow MC
House: Sch, 1900 - 1906. Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regt..
Died: 12 August 1916 aged 29 in France. Killed in action at Bazentin-le-Petit.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 9A, 9B, 10B

Son of W. A. Onslow, Preston Bagot House, Henley-in-Arden. b. 1887.
Lower V—Lower VI. House Prefect. House XI Cricket.
Keble College, Oxford ; B.A. (Second Class History) 1909 .
In business ; worked for many years at the School Mission.
Great War, Australian Voluntary Hospital 1914 (overseas) ; 2nd Lieutenant Royal Warwickshire Regt. M.C.

'Arthur Onslow was a most painstaking, earnest-minded boy at School. His ability was above the average, and he always did his best all round. He had hoped to be ordained, but an unfortunate tendency to stammering stood in his way. But he went to the School Mission and did most excellent work there for some years. At the outbreak of war he (and other members of the Mission Staff) joined the Australian Voluntary Hospital. In May 1915 he returned to England and received a commission in his own county regiment (the Royal Warwickshire). Nearly a year later he went to the front, where he distinguished himself over and over again. Recommended for reward for his gallantry on July 15th, he met his death on August 12th, while bravely leading his men in a grenade attack on a specially difficult position. His name appeared in the Gazette on September 22nd, and in the list of those to whom the Military Cross had been awarded. He was quiet and unassuming, but his character was remarkably strong, and he was greatly loved.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Photo of John Barwick Orde
Captain John Barwick Orde MC
House: No 4, 1901 - 1904. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 12 February 1917 aged 31 in Greece. Died of wounds.
Cemetery: Karasouli Military Cemetery

Son of Lieut.-Colonel Orde, Nunny Kirk, Morpeth, b. 1886.
Army III—I. Minor Scholar. House Prefect.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.F.A. 1907 ; Captain 1914.
Great War, Brigade-Major; M.C., Despatches.

'After passing out of Woolwich he was appointed to a Battery of the R.F.A., in which he served in England, South Africa, and India. In December 1914, he went with his division to France, and saw hard service in that country for more than a year, after which he was sent to another front. During his time in France he acted as Staff Captain, as temporary Brigade Major, and as Liaison Officer. In January, 1915, he was mentioned in despatches, and in the following December was promoted Major, and appointed to the command of a Battery. Last January he was awarded the Military Cross. He died on February 12th of wounds received the same day. As a soldier he was considered exceptionally efficient and admired for his invariably cheerful and courageous spirit. "He was," writes a brother officer, "the life and soul of the Brigade, and was literally loved by both officers, and men''—words, the reality of which will be readily understood by the many who shared his friendship here.' (Malvernian, Apr 1917).

Photo of Walter Selwyn Orpen
2nd Lieut Walter Selwyn Orpen
House: Sch, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died: 06 July 1916 aged 23 in France. Killed in action near Fricourt.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Thiepval Memorial P 3C, 3D

Son of Rev. T. H. Orpen and Mrs. Amy 0. G. Orpen of 5, Herschel Rd., Cambridge and Mark Ash, Abinger Common, Dorking, b. 1893.
Upper Shell—Lower V.
Selwyn College, Cambridge.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant N. Staffordshire Regt.; transferred 2nd Bn. attd. 10th Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers.

'At school he was a small, quiet boy, always well behaved and steady, and likely to develop later. This he certainly did.' (Malvernian, Jul 1916).

Times Obituary, 27th July 1916: “Second Lieutenant Walter Selwyn Orpen, North Staffordshire Regiment, who was killed on July 6th aged 23 was the youngest son of the Rev. T. H. and Mrs Orpen of Mark Ash, Abinger, Surrey. He was educated at Malvern, and at Selwyn College, Cambridge where he had completed his second year when war was declared. He was then in the OTC and was gazetted to the North Staffordshire Regiment in September 1914. After 9 months training he went to the Front being attached to the Lancashire fusiliers. He had recently been made sniping Intelligence Officer to his battalion, and it was in the discharge of this duty that he met his death instantaneously from a snipers bullet. His adjutant writes: During the time he has been with us I grew to like him more and more and to respect his many good qualities. He was always cheerful and brave.”
Biography at Dorking Museum

Photo of Lucien Eugene Oudin
Captain Lucien Eugene Oudin
House: Sch, 1905 - 1909. Regiment: Duke of Cornwall's Light Inf..
Died: 24 August 1916 aged 25 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Dive Copse British Sailly Le Sec 11 G 14

Son of E. Oudin. b. 1891.
Upper IV A—Matriculation Class. House Prefect. Ledbury Cap.
Great War, Private Royal Fusiliers 1914 ; Captain Duke of Cornwall's L.I.
Killed in action, August 24, 1916 ; M.C.

'At School he was a keen runner, a singer of some promise, and a boy of blameless character. He "came on" considerably during his last year, and it is no surprise to those who knew him that his record in the service is so distinguished.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

The Times: "Captain Oudin enlisted in the 2nd (City of London) Royal Fusiliers on August 5, 1914, and went to Malta with the regiment, returning in December to take up his commission. He went to the front in July 1915, and was decorated with the Military Cross for a conspicuous act of gallantry. The official report stated that when cut off in a bombing post with a machine-gun and a few men, he held his own under a very heavy bombardment, and, when attacked, successfully repelled the enemy. He received his Captaincy in July. He was killed in action on August 24th."

Photo of John Gilbert Overman
2nd Lieut John Gilbert Overman
House: No 3, 1911 - 1913. Regiment: Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.
Died: 09 September 1918 aged 22 in France. Killed in action at Chapel Hill.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: Gouzeaucourt New British 1 H 8

Son of G. W. Overman, Manor House, Weasenham, Norfolk, b. 1896.
Lower Modern II—Lower Modern I.
With an Estate Agent.
Great War, Trooper Norfolk Yeomanry 1914; 2nd Lieutenant, Captain Yorkshire L.I.

'By his subsequent career J. G. Overman fully justified the opinion formed of him here that he was a boy of strong and determined character, who would tackle with courage any difficulty that crossed his path. Those who knew him here will read with pride, and readily believe, that the enemy trench in which he was killed was reached by the battalion largely owing to his determination and gallantry. In a short time he had made himself a most efficient soldier; his General pays a very high tribute to his able leadership, and had prophesied that he would go very far in the profession which this war had called upon him to adopt.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918)

Photo of Gerald Lewis Paget
Lieutenant Gerald Lewis Paget
House: No 1, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: Northumberland Fus..
Died: 13 July 1917 aged 33 in Palestine. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Jerusalem Memorial P 10

Son of A. Paget, Radmoor, Loughborough, b. 1884.
Modern IV—II.
Engineer ; with M.R., Parsons' Steam Turbine Co., and N.E.R.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Northumberland Fusiliers (N.E.R. Pioneers), R.F.C. attached Australian F.C.

'Gerald Paget entered the service of the North-Eastern Railway in 1909, after previous engineering experience elsewhere. He was an enthusiastic railwayman, and took the keenest interest in all new ideas and inventions. Early in 1915 he joined the N.E.R. Pioneers, and was afterwards attached to the Australian Flying Corps. Here he soon established the most cordial relations with his new comrades, being always cheerful and helpful, and taking far more than his share of the work. He was out flying on July 13, with a new pilot, when the machine was shot down; both men were killed instantaneously and buried with military honours by the enemy. He leaves a wife and young daughter; to whom we offer our most sincere sympathy.' (Malvernian, Dec 1917).

Photo of Guy Nicholas Palmes
Lieutenant Guy Nicholas Palmes
House: Sch, 1908 - 1911. Regiment: Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.
Died: 08 May 1915 aged 21 in Belgium. Killed in action at Ypres.
Battle: Second Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 47

Born 14th July 1894. Son of Rev. George and Eva Blanche Palmes, Naburn Hall, York.
Army III.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; 1st Bn. King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry 1914 ; Lieutenant 1915.

'He was killed in action near Ypres whilst rallying his men in a charge against the Prussian Guard. ' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

'He was wounded on May 8th round Zonnebeke. It took three wounds to finish him. He came out with us and was a very nice gentleman. I saw him wounded the first time, but he kept going and was going about with a bayonet in one hand and a revolver in the other. It was the case of every man for himself, and we had to get back to keep the line straight. He got finished on the way and his servant was wounded trying to save him. The stretcher bearers sent in the news of his death. A man of my Coy, Pte Storey, who has been killed since saw him dead and told us.' (Ref Lance Corporal Dexter, No 14 Clearing Hospital, July 23rd 1915, Boulogne).

Below is the unit war diary extract:
'Friezenberg.
8th May 1915. Trenches heavily shelled with high explosive; this was followed by a ferocious attack. C & D Companies were shelled out of their trenches. A & B drove off ferocious attack and withdrew from trenches at night.
Casualties. Killed Captain H K Hughes, Captain K Lambert, Lieut Palmes and 53 Other Ranks.'

Service record: WO 339/15776
Unit war diary: WO 95/2274/1

Photo of Maxwell Colquhoun Pearson
Lieutenant Maxwell Colquhoun Pearson
House: Sch, 1896 - 1896. Regiment: Cameron Highlanders.
Died: 23 November 1915 aged 34 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Vermelles British LL 1

Son of A. L. Pearson, Walkinshaw, Renfrew, Scotland, b. 1881.
Ill—Modern IV.
Farmer in New Zealand, Queensland and Argentina; on the Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway.
Great War, Lieutenant 7th Cameron Highlanders 1914.

'After a period of office training, he went to New Zealand and took up sheep farming. This was followed by a visit to Queensland and his return home. He then joined his brother in an estancia in the Argentine, subsequently obtaining a post on the Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway. When war broke out he came home to fight for his country, and obtained a commission in the Cameron Highlanders. He was shot through the head by a German sniper, on the morning of November 23rd, 1915. From letters we have seen, it was obvious that he was in every way a most efficient soldier.' (Malvernian, Nov 1919).

Photo of Maurice Murray Pearson
2nd Lieut Maurice Murray Pearson
House: No 3, 1905 - 1910. Regiment: Worcester Yeomanry.
Died: 23 April 1916 aged 25 in Egypt. Killed in action at Oghratina, Egypt.
Cemetery: Jerusalem Memorial P 3/5

Son of J. F. Pearson, The Birches, Hagley, Worcs. b. 1891.
Upper V—VI. Minor Scholar. School Prefect. XXII Football.
Oriel College, Oxford.
In business.
Great War, Trooper Worcestershire Yeomanry 1914, 2nd Lieutenant.
Killed in action at Oghratina (Egypt), April 23, 1916.

'Maurice Pearson was a boy with a strong personality: his affectionate nature, his keen sense of humour, and his untiring activity made him a centre of a most happy band of friends both here and at Oxford. At the outbreak of war he joined the Yeomanry as a Trooper; he received a commission in March 1915, and was sent out to the East in September. On Easter Sunday of this year his company was overwhelmed, and he was shot through the chest; while his wound was being dressed he was again shot, and died before the fight was over.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Photo of George Douglas Pechell
2nd Lieut George Douglas Pechell
House: No 7, 1905 - 1908. Regiment: 66 Sq. R. F. C..
Died: 21 December 1916 aged 25 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying.
Cemetery: Bristol Canford Cemetery SEC F 2B

Second Son of Sir Alexander Brooke Pechell (R.A.M.C), Bt. b. 1891.
Upper Modern II—Modern I.
Coffee Planter; late 2nd Lieutenant 6th Hants Battery R.F.A. (T.F.).
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant I. A.R.O. 1914 ; R.F.C.
Accidentally killed December 21, 1916.

'After leaving School he joined the Hants Batt. R.F.A. (T.F.). Subsequently he went abroad and was engaged in coffee planting in S. India. On the outbreak of war he joined the Indian Army Reserve of Officers, and eventually came home to take up flying. He was killed while flying on Dec. 21st, 1916. (Malvernian, Mar 1917).

Photo of Robert Lloyd Peel
Lieutenant Robert Lloyd Peel MC
House: No 2, 1901 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 03 September 1917 aged 28 in Belgium. Died of wounds.
Battle: Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Cemetery: Bard Cottage Cemetery 111 F 2

Son of H. Peel, Taliaris, Llandilo, S. Wales, b. 1889.
Middle IV—Modern I. House Prefect. House XI Football.
Tea Planter in India.
Great War, Lieutenant R.F.A.

'Robert Peel was a boy of a quite distinctive character. He had great influence in his House. His quiet demeanour, his sound principles, his stern sense of duty, made a deep impression on those with whom he came into contact. His thoughtfulness for others was a noticeable feature in his character in those early days, and this characteristic came out fully when he became an officer in the Army.
He held an appointment in the south of India when war broke out. He resigned this, and reached England in December, 1914. He received his commission on December 30th, in the R.F.A. He was at Suvla Bay from August, 1915, till the evacuation, and then in Egypt till the battery went to another front in July 1916. Last December he was awarded the Military Cross, for rescuing wounded under heavy fire, and preventing the explosion of ammunition dumps. He died, on September 3rd, of a shell wound received the same day while on duty with the guns.
Those officers who knew him most intimately have written of him as follows: "He was a man of very wonderful sympathies, whose fine sensibilities and humanity not even the worst side of war could blunt. He was one of my best officers, and a very tower of strength and help at all times."
"He left the impress of his personality writ large over all his men ; he has 'made' by his example more officers than one."
"When he was wounded he realised that his wound was fatal, and he tried to persuade the doctor to leave him, and said, 'The time you spend in attending to me will be wasted; look after the others, please.' As he lived a splendid life, so he died a splendid death."
"Had anyone else met his death as he did, we should have thought it wonderful : as it was —he was just himself."' (Malvernian, Nov 1917).

Photo of Kenneth Hugh Pegg
2nd Lieut Kenneth Hugh Pegg
House: Sch, 1904 - 1909. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 20 February 1916 aged 25 in Iraq. Killed in action in Persian Gulf.
Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 12

Son of Mrs. A. E. Saunders, Rothley Vicarage, Leicestershire, b. 1891.
Middle IV—Middle Shell. House Prefect. XL Football.
In Canada.
Great War, Private Canadian Forces 1914 ; 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Leicestershire Regt.
Killed in action in Mesopotamia, February 20, 1916.

'At School he showed great pluck and keenness in his games. At the time of the outbreak of war he had been in Canada about two months, and within a few weeks of the opening of hostilities he enlisted, and eventually came to England with the first Canadian Contingent. At Christmas 1914, he was given a commission, and transferred to the 3rd Leicestershire Regiment, and in the following March he went to France attached to the 2nd Battalion, and saw a good deal of active service before his removal to Mesopotamia in November. He was killed about Feb. 20th, 1916, in the Persian Gulf, at the age of 26.' (Malvernian, Apr 1916).

Photo of Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton
Captain Francis Percy Campbell Pemberton
House: No 8, 1899 - 1900. Regiment: Life Guards.
Died: 19 October 1914 aged 29 in Belgium. Killed in action in Belgium.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Dadizeele New British Cemetery

Born 4th April 1885. Son of Canon Thomas Percy and Patience Frances Sophia Pemberton, Gilling East, York, and Trumpington Hall, Cambridge.
Lower IV.
Trinity College, Cambridge; "C" Sqdn. 2nd Life Guards 1909; Captain 1914.
Husband of Winifred Mary Colegate (formerly Pemberton), of 16, Prince's Gardens, London.
Great War.

'He took his course at the Cavalry School at Netheravon 1911—12, and in May of the latter year was seconded as Cavalry Instructor to the Oxford and Cambridge O.T.C., but on the outbreak of the European War was recalled to his regiment; went to France with the Household Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Cavalry Division, Expeditionary Force, on 6 Oct. 1914, and was killed in action near Moorslede (between Roulers and Staden) 19 Oct. following.
The force against them being tremendous, the order to retire was given. They tried to bring Capt. Pemberton with them, but were unable to do so, and his body was never recovered. A Corporal of Horse in his regiment wrote: “It is unnecessary to say how much we boys regretted his death, for always he had proved himself one of the best, an excellent soldier and a grand leader, always thinking of others before himself and was always in the van.”
He was a fine all-round sportsman, a splendid cricketer, a keen huntsman, and a very good shot. And had a great natural and charming gift for music. He was a playing member of the M.C.C., also of the Cambridgeshire County Cricket Club, a vice-president and member of the Trumpington Cricket Club. He married at Hovingham Parish Church, 30 Apr11, 1912, Winifred Mary (Hovingham Hall, Malton), eldest daughter of Sir William Henry Arthington Worsley, of Hovingham Hall, 3rd Bart.' (De Ruvigny)

Photo of Alfred Brankston Pembroke
Captain Alfred Brankston Pembroke
House: No 7, 1890 - 1894. Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died: 07 September 1916 aged 39 in -. Died of illness.
Cemetery: Greenwich

Son of E. Pembroke, 5 Vanbrugh Park, S.E. b. 1877.
III—Modern II. School Prefect. House XI Cricket and Football.
Shipowner; served in the South African War, Captain 3rd Batt. West Kent Regt., Queen’s Medal with 2 Clasps; Captain 3rd Batt. Lancashire Fusiliers 1906; retired as Hon. Major 1913.
Great War, re-joined, Captain 10th Batt. Died September 7, 1916.

He married Mabel Francis Byng, daughter of Francis Russell Byng and Emily Mary Lambe.

'One of the first three boys to enter No, 7 when it was opened as a small house, Alfred Pembroke soon became popular with everyone. He never attained any great distinction either in work or games, but he was a singularly attractive boy, and he became a School Prefect and played for the house at cricket and football. He was always extremely keen on the Corps, and attended several camps. He left school early, being very anxious to join his father's business as soon as possible. A business career did not, however, suit him and he eventually joined the Army and served in the 3rd Battalion West Kent Regiment in the South African War. He became Captain in the 3rd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers in 1906, and retired as Hon. Major in 1913. On the outbreak of war he at once joined up again, but his health, which for some time had been indifferent, completely gave way, and for some time before his death he was in a nursing home. He frequently visited Malvern in the last few years, and was 'always a very keen O. M. He died on September 7th, aged 38.' (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Photo of Richard Henry Perceval Perceval-Maxwell
Lieutenant Richard Henry Perceval Perceval-Maxwell
House: Sch, 1912 - 1914. Regiment: Scottish Rifles.
Died: 23 July 1918 aged 21 in France. Killed in action at Buzancy.
Cemetery: Buzancy II. D. 14.

Son of Colonel R. D. Perceval-Maxwell, D.S.O., Finnebrogue, Downpatrick. b. 1897.
Army III—II.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; Scottish Rifles 1915 ; Lieutenant 1916.

'He left Malvern young, seizing the opportunity of the emergency examination for Sandhurst in August 1914. On passing out of Sandhurst he was gazetted to the Scottish Rifles, but was kept at home till within a week of his 19th birthday, when he was sent to France. He fought on the Flanders front and was wounded on July 31, 1917. Returning to France in April 1918, he was killed in action July 23. Letters from his Colonel and brother officers show that he was a fine and fearless soldier and a great loss to his regiment.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Photo of Maurice Case Perks
2nd Lieut Maurice Case Perks
House: Day, 1898 - 1901. Regiment: North Lancashire Regt..
Died: 26 April 1917 aged 30 in France. Killed in action at St Quentin.
Battle: Second Battle of Arras. Cemetery: St Quentin Cabaret Cemetery 11 D 6

Son of W. Perks, Holly Mount Cottage, Malvern, b. 1887.
Ill—Lower V.
Oriel College, Oxford ; Fourth Class Class. Mods. ; B.A. (Third Class History) 1909 ; Winner of Light-weights, Novices Boxing, 1906.
2nd Lieutenant Oxfords and Bucks L.I. (T.F.).
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 9th North Lancashire Regt. Killed in action near St. Quentin, April 26, 1917.

'While at Oxford he held a commission in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. On the outbreak of war he was appointed to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment and saw much active service, being wounded in July 1916. He was invalided home and returned to the Front last November. He was killed on April 26th while attached to a trench mortar battery.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Photo of Alan Roy Petrie
Lance Corporal Alan Roy Petrie
House: No 1, 1897 - 1902. Regiment: London Scottish Regt..
Died: 13 November 1914 aged 30 in Belgium. Killed in action near Ypres.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 54

Son of Douglas Petrie, White House, Hadley, Barnet. b. 1884.
"E" Coy. 1st/14th Bn. London Regiment (London Scottish)

'"Roy," as he was always called, was thirteen when he joined us, and he spent more than five years here. His characteristics were an independent nature and an upright view of life and its duties. He was good at work and games, and possessed a charm of manner which made him popular with all. When he left school he had the distinction of passing the Surveyors' Institute Examination at the head of the list. He had apparently a very successful prospect before him, but he placed his duty to his country before his private interests, went with the London Scottish to the front, and met his death near Ypres.' (Malvernian, Dec 1914).

His unit arrived at Hooge in the Ypres salient on 7th November 1914, and on the 8th November they moved to Zillebeke and into trenches in the wood 1 ½ miles, south-east of the village. Here they stayed until 13th November, heavily shelled day and night. Their right flank was very vulnerable and a farmhouse on the left flank was occupied by the enemy. Several small attacks were made on their trenches during the first night there and on 10th November there was a fierce artillery bombardment that destroyed the HQ dug-out. Some of the trenches were so badly damaged that new ones had to be dug. The next day, 11th November, at 6.30am, the whole of the British line here was heavily shelled accompanied by a constant rain of rifle bullets. Then, from the German trenches, only 100 yards away, came the enemy infantry, advancing in large numbers from the woods behind them. By this time his battalion were fighting in two separate groups, having men from 2nd Welsh and 2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers between them, and a very strong force of Germans were heading towards the right group. Their right flank was enveloped and things looked serious until a counter attack against the exposed left flank of the enemy was made by some of 2nd King’s Royal Rifle Corps which restored the situation. Later the left half of the 14th London also came under serious attack and this time the situation was saved by bringing up what remained of Battalion HQ into the line. By the end of the day the Germans had made no gains in this sector. During the night of 13-14th November, the 14th London were withdrawn form the line and moved back to a wood near Hooge before going into Corps reserve the next day. Alan Petrie was one of the casualties on the 13th November.
Biography at London War Memorial

Photo of Maurice Aldcroft Phillips
Captain Maurice Aldcroft Phillips
House: Sch, 1899 - 1903. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 21 May 1915 aged 30 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial 11 D 15

Born: November 2nd 1885. Son of Charles Aldcroft Phillips and Constance Phillips, Dildawn, Castle Douglas, Scotland.
Army III—I.
R.M.A. Woolwich; R.F.A. 1905 ; Captain 1914, 31st Bty Royal Field Artillery.
Great War, Despatches.

He was in hospital in Boulogne with stomatitis and was discharged from hospital on 22nd January 1915.

'He had been sent forward to our front trenches, his task being to control the fire of two batteries by telephone during an attack made by the Canadians. In the early morning of May 21, the attack being over, he was sleeping behind a haystack, when a shell burst immediately overhead and killed him instantly. His commanding officer writes: "Not only was he a very great friend of mine, but the most loyal, brave, and energetic of officers." ' (Malvernian, Jun 1915).

Service record: WO 339/6406

Photo of Thomas Glyn Llewelyn Phillips
Captain Thomas Glyn Llewelyn Phillips
House: No 8, 1908 - 1913. Regiment: Welch Regt..
Died: 26 March 1917 aged 23 in Palestine. Killed in action at Gaza.
Cemetery: Jerusalem Memorial P 30/32

Son of Thomas Richards Phillips, and Annie Phillips, of 45, Park Place, Cardiff, and Sandown, Park Place, Cardiff, b. 1894.
Lower IV—Science I. House XI Cricket and Football.
Mining Engineer ; 5th Batt. Welch Regt. (T.F.) 1913.
Great War, mobilised 1914, Captain. 5th Bn. Welsh Regiment

'Two dominant characteristics of Glyn Phillips were industry and perseverance; whatever he took in hand he carried through by hard work and determination. So it was at School, and, on leaving the College he threw himself with the same vigour into the preparation for his life's work.
Always a keen member of the O.T.C., he at once responded to his country's call and became a very efficient officer. In 1915 he was sent to Gallipoli and took part in much hard fighting—through which, however, he passed unscathed. Afterwards he saw service in Egypt, but was invalided home last summer. Returning to Egypt at the beginning of this year he joined the Palestine expedition and fell in action before Gaza.
To his devotion to duty, cool courage, and kind thought for others, letters from those whom he led and from brother officers bear evidence, e.g., "The boys have lost a good commander and comrade, always ready to help and advise, one who would not ask any man to do what he would not attempt himself"; " He was dearly loved by all the men of the 1/5th Welsh Regt and to whom I believe I owe my life, viz., in saving me after being seriously wounded from the peril of a terrible gorse fire which was raging at that time',' " He was very good in action and did not hesitate to expose himself when necessary."' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

Photo of Philip Simons Picot
Captain Philip Simons Picot
House: Day, 1903 - 1906. Regiment: Sherwood Foresters.
Died: 11 July 1915 aged 26 in Turkey. Killed in action at Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Twelve Tree Copse, Dardenelles C 149

Son of Major F. S. Picot, Junior United Service Club, S.W. b. 1889.
Army IV—I. House Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst; West Yorkshire Regt. 1908 ; resigned 1910.
School of Mines, Camborne ; with Eastern Smelting Company, Penang.
Great War, Captain. 14th Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment).
He married Marjorie Putnam on the 29th of November 1912 in St. Jude's church, West Kensington, London, England.
They had one daughter, Caroline Fay Picot born on the 20th March 1914.

'After serving in the West Yorkshire Regiment for three years he spent three years at the Mining School, Camborne, and later became a manager of the Eastern Smelting Company, Penang. On the outbreak of the war he served with the Penang Volunteers, but feeling his services would be more valuable at home, returned, and was immediately given a commission and within a month promoted Captain. He again volunteered and was sent to the Dardanelles, and fell on July 11 while attached to the 5th Royal Scots.' (Malvernian, Jul 1915).

“He was a Captain in the 14th Sherwood Foresters but volunteered for active service, and took out six officers to the Dardanelles. He went straight into the trenches and took over command of the 1st Battalion 5th Royal Scots [1], which earned great glory with the 29th Regular Division – the Immortals. He commanded the Royal Scots in several attacks on Achi Baba and took and held two lines of trenches though the Turks attacked on three consecutive nights and at the end only 200 men and 6 officers were left. He was ordered to take his battalion on relief out of the trenches to refit and rest on the Beach. He did this safely on 11th July, 1915. On calling the roll he found some wounded men were out in the front. As the fire was heavy and the position very exposed, he said: “I will go out alone and search for them.” He never came back. He was found shot through the head, insensible, and died in half an hour. (Pinang Gazette)

“In his last letter to his father Capt. Picot said, “The fighting is very severe, losses very heavy, death on every side, but, strangely, death has no horror to me. I will hold on. The Turks will never take my trenches. I am only tired out. No sleep for three night, fighting all the time for 18 days. I will never be a prisoner of war! I have had two periscopes smashed and more shaves of death than you would think possible.”

“Capt. Picot’s commander wrote to his father: “Your son was a brilliant soldier, a gallant officer and absolutely fearless.”
Detailed biography at sherwood-foresters.co.uk

Service record: WO 339/7192

Photo of Albert Humphrey Pinder
Lieutenant Albert Humphrey Pinder
House: No 4, 1900 - 1906. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 15 September 1916 aged 29 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Guards Cemetery Les Boeufs SP MEM 48

Son of Rev. J. G. Pinder, C.F. b. 1887.
Middle V—Mathematical VI. House Scholar. English Essay ;
Dowdeswell Prize 1904-06 ; Warrington Exhibition. School Prefect.
Mathematical Scholar, Queens' College, Cambridge ; B.A. (Sen. Opt.) 1909 .
Ceylon Civil Service 1910.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Leicestershire Regt. 1915. Despatches.

'Held in high regard for his singularly sincere and unselfish character, he was also intellectually one of the most distinguished boys of his time. He was not only an apt mathematician, but also showed a marked literary bent; and he proved during his short term of service in Ceylon that he possessed administrative ability of a high order. Volunteering for the war in 1915, he was given a commission in a Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment, in which he was later promoted Lieutenant and became Signalling Officer. He was considered a particularly cool, capable, and trustworthy officer, invariably cheerful under whatever conditions. For conspicuous gallantry on one occasion, when, exposed to heavy fire, he dug out men buried by a shell, his name was specially recorded. He was killed—it is thought by a sniper—on September 15th.' (Malvernian, Dec 1916).

Photo of Stanley Fitzherbert Porter
2nd Lieut Stanley Fitzherbert Porter
House: No 3, 1913 - 1916. Regiment: Royal Flying Corps.
Died: 06 June 1917 aged 19 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed.
Cemetery: Sefton, St Helens, Lancs

Son of T. F. Porter, Sandheys, Blundellsands, Liverpool, b. 1898.
Middle IV A—Upper Modern II. Morgan Engineering. School Prefect. Shooting VIII. Goldingham Cup.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant R.F.C. Accidentally killed June 6, 1917.

'Fitz Porter was a born engineer, but what pleased him even more than engineering was to tackle anything in School or out of it with an unconquerable perseverance. This was the characteristic that marked him out for the position of prefect and showed every promise of success in the future. News of his fatal accident brought a genuine regret to all who knew anything of him and had formed high hopes of his career; but they will ever remember how inspired they have been by his generous friendship, his cheery optimism, and his fixed resolve to go straight and hard.' (Malvernian, Jul 1917).

Photo of Theodore Prain
Lieutenant Theodore Prain
House: No 1, 1901 - 1905. Regiment: Leicestershire Regt..
Died: 22 October 1914 aged 27 in Belgium. Killed in action near Armentieres.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ploegsteert Memorial P 4

Born 6th November 1887. Son of Lt.-Col. Sir David Prain, C.M.G., C.I.E.(Director or Royal Botanic Gradens in Kew), and Lady Prain, of The Well Farm, Warlingham, Surrey.
Upper V—VI. Senior Scholar. Faber Exhibitioner. House Prefect.
University of St. Andrews ; B.A. 1908 ; Lincoln College, Oxford ; B.A. 1910 ; Oxford University O.T.C. ;
Leicestershire Regt. 1910 ; Lieutenant 1912.
Great War (overseas). "C" Coy. 1st Bn. Leicestershire Regiment. Despatches.

Qualified as a 1st Class Interpreter in French.

Died at Rue de Bois near Armentieres.

Below is an extract from the Unit War Diary:
'21st October 1914. Ordered to relieve W. Yorks in Chemical Factory - Rue De Bois line at 8pm.
22nd October (Thurs). Held trenches. Heavily shelled by shrapnel and heavy howitzers all day. Casualties, Lt Prain, Lt Dods and 11 other ranks killed and 25 wounded. '

Service record: WO 339/7875
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1611/2

Photo of Arthur John Dillon Preston
Captain Arthur John Dillon Preston
House: No 9, 1899 - 1904. Regiment: Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Died: 15 August 1915 aged 30 in Turkey. Killed in action at Suvla Bay.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Azmak Cemetery Suvla SP MEM 50

Son of Major Preston, Swainston, Dunsany, co. Meath. b. 1885.
Army IV—I. School Prefect. Head of House. XL Cricket and Football.
3rd Durham L.I. 1904 ; Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1907 ; Captain
1914.
Great War, killed in action in Gallipoli August 15, 1915 ; Despatches.

'As Head of his House he proved a real leader, and put the greatest enthusiasm into all which he undertook.
At the outbreak of war he was ordered to Naas and afterwards to the Curragh, to raise the 6th Service Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, with which he proceeded to the Gallipoli Peninsular on July 9th. He took part in all the heavy fighting at Suvla Bay until August 15th, when he fell in the moment of victory.
An officer of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers wrote: "When the word came that we were to clear the ridge we fixed bayonets; then we all started together, Dublins and Munsters, John (Captain Preston) shouting 'Come on, boys.' They (the Turks) threw bombs and opened fire upon us as we neared the top, but we went straight on and rushed the trench. The Turks put up their hands. I saw John stop his men who were just going to bayonet a Turkish officer. As you know, he was my best friend, and was loved by everyone in the regiment, officers, N.C.O.'s, and men."' (Malvernian, Dec 1915).

Photo of Harry Ryland Priestley
Lieutenant Harry Ryland Priestley
House: No 7, 1909 - 1911. Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died: 19 June 1918 aged 23 in United Kingdom. Died in England after gas poisoning.
Cemetery: Perry Bar St Johns Church EAST CORNER

Son of Mrs. Priestley, Edgbaston. b. 1895.
Middle IV B—Modern II. House XI Football.
In business.
Great War Private 6th Royal Warwickshire Regt. 1914 ; Lieutenant R.G.A.

'He enlisted in September 1914, in the 6th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and went to France in March 1915. In September 1915 he obtained a commission in the R.G.A., and in the spring of 1916 he again went to France, and from then until he was sent home in March 1918, suffering from gas poisoning, he was in the thick of the fighting both on the Somme and at Passchendale. A wonderful tribute has been received from his C.O. of his bravery and goodness, and from all sides his mother has been comforted by hearing of the respect in which he was held by his men. He died at Streatham Hall Military Hospital, Exeter, on June 19th.' (Malvernian, Jul 1918)

Photo of Alick Lancelot Prince
Captain Alick Lancelot Prince
House: No 6, 1893 - 1896. Regiment: North Lancashire Regt..
Died: 08 November 1914 aged 36 in Belgium. Killed in action near Kemmel.
Battle: First Battle of Ypres. Cemetery: Ypres Menin Gate P 41/43

Born on 12th Sept 1878. Son of T. T. Prince, Laurel Lodge, Barnet.
Ill—Lower V.
Emmanuel College, Cambridge ; B.A. 1899 ; Manchester Regt. 1901 ; North Lancashire Regt. 1908 ; Captain 1912 ; Malay States Guides 1910-13 ; South African War 1901-02, Queen's Medal with 3 Clasps.
Great War. 1st Bn. The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Despatches.
He married Emma Caroline, daughter of William Beadell Bacon, Tunbridge Wells, and left two sons, Harold, born in November 1911, and Ralp Bacon, born in February 1914.

It was reported he was shot in the head but was too near the German lines to be reached.
Biography at IWM

Photo of Norman Douglas Pringle
Captain Norman Douglas Pringle
House: No 2, 1899 - 1900. Regiment: East Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 08 August 1915 aged 31 in Turkey. Killed in action at Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Helles Memorial P 51/54

Son of Dr. H. T. Pringle, Hawtree, Ferndown, Wimborne. b. 1884.
Lower IV—Shell.
Lincoln College, Oxford ; B.A. 1912 ;
Assistant Master, Stubbington House, Fareham, 1911 ; Suffield Park School, Cromer, 1913. Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 6th E. Yorkshire Regt. 1914 ; afterwards Captain.

'He left School rather young to study medicine, but later on he decided to matriculate at Oxford. He was at Lincoln College, and took his degree in 1912. He then took up teaching as his profession, and at the time of the outbreak of war he was a master in a preparatory school at Cromer. He volunteered for service and was given a commission in the East Yorkshire Regt. (6th Battalion). He was promoted Captain in Feb. 1915. He was killed in action in the Dardanelles about the 8th of August. His career at School was too short to admit of his reaching a position of prominence, but his high principle and sense of duty won for him the esteem of those who came into contact with him.' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

His battalion landed at Suvla Bay on 7 August 1915, and on the following day, the battalion was ordered to join 32 Brigade, near Chocolate Hill. Norman took command of C Company, and the battalion was ordered to attack the Turkish lines at Tekke Tepe. He was killed in action during this assault on 10 August 1915.
Biography at West Wales War Memorial Project

There is a memorial to him at St Davids, Preseli Pembrokeshire, Dyfed.Memorial details

Photo of James Edward Douglas Prothero
Captain James Edward Douglas Prothero
House: No 6, 1899 - 1902. Regiment: Punjabis (I.A.).
Died: 01 August 1918 aged 34 in Iran. Died on service.
Cemetery: Tehran War Cemetery 1V D 14

Son of E. D. Prothero, Glenburn, Prestwick, Ayrshire, b. 1884.
Army III—I. School Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Cheshire Regt. 1903 ; Indian Army (90th Punjabis) 1905 ; Captain 1912 ; in Civil Employment, Burma Commission.
Great War, 90th Punjabis attd. Indian Political Department. Despatches.

'He was a boy of marked ability, who would have gone far in the sphere of work which he had adopted. We well remember the interesting account which he gave us of it all during a visit which he paid us some few years ago.' (Malvernian, Nov 1918).

Photo of John Puckle
Lieutenant Colonel John Puckle DSO
House: Sch, 1884 - 1886. Regiment: Army Service Corps.
Died: 15 April 1917 aged 48 in Greece. Lost at sea on Transport 'Arcadian'.
Cemetery: Mikra Memorial

Son of Colonel H. G. Puckle (Madras Staff Corps) and Cecilia Puckle, Pitlochry. b. 1869.
Upper III—1V. XXII Football; House XI Cricket.
Peterhouse, Cambridge, 1889; R.M.C. Sandhurst; South Wales Borderers 1893; A.S.C. 1894; Major 1906;
Winner Army Rackets and Lawn Tennis Doubles.
South African War, Despatches. Queen’s Medal, D.S.O., 1902.
Husband of Mary Clifton Tabor (formerly Puckle), of 91, Grosvenor House, Park St., London.
Great War, Lieut.-Colonel 1915. Lost at sea on the transport Arcadian April 15, 1917, Despatches.

'Lieutenant-Colonel Puckle was one of the first three British officers to land in France at the outbreak of the present war, being sent out in advance of the Expeditionary Force. He was mentioned in despatches in May 1915, and was one of eighteen officers reported missing, believed drowned on April 15th. He was one of the pair who won, two years in succession, for the A.S.C. the Army Rackets Championship Doubles, and also the Army Lawn Tennis Championship Doubles.' (Malvernian, Jun 1917).

'He was ordered to Palestine in March 1917, and was drowned near Stephanos, Greece, on the 15th April, when he was officer commanding troops (about 1,600) on board H.M. Transport Arcadian. An officer wrote: “I have never experienced greater kindness from any commanding officer; His friendly courtesy, his extreme consideration for others, and his never-failing nobility of mind were conspicuous traits in him, which endeared him to all with whom he had dealings, whether official or social. We all looked up to him as the true Ideal of what an officer and a gentleman should be, and one and all admired and respected him accordingly. Of the many officers under whom I have served I have never known one with such a wonderful sense of duty.
He saved many lives by his organization on the Arcadian, and by his attention to duty and the example he set when the disaster took place.
It was a supreme test of courage and discipline which he bore unflinchingly. We who knew him and had the honour of serving under him —and it was indeed an honour—are not surprised at his self-sacrifice. He never on any occasion spared himself.”' (De Ruvigny)

Photo of Wilfred Quihampton
Private Wilfred Quihampton
House: No 3, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: Australian Infantry.
Died: 19 July 1916 aged 30 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: VC Corner Australian Fromelles 11

Son of William G. and Clara Quihampton, of Wood Cottage, Nutfield, Surrey, b. 1886.
Middle IV B—Upper IV C.
Formerly in British Columbia ; later Farmer in Canada.
Great War, Private, 54th Bn. Australian Infantry. 1914.

'He was the younger of two brothers in No. 3. As a New Boy he was remarkable for his very large size, and he rejoiced in the name of "Jumbo." His extreme good-nature made him a most popular boy. On leaving school he went out to farm in British Columbia, and moved into Canada later on. When war broke out he answered the call of his country, and served as a Private in the Australian Imperial Force. He was killed in action in July 1917.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

Embarked Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force, 19 June 1916; disembarked Marseilles, France, 19/20 July 1916.

Letter from 4310 R.O. SAMUELS, to Mrs Quihampton, 14 August 1916: 'As I am the other remaining friend of your son, W. Quihampton, it is my duty to write you a short letter. The day after we embarked in Sydney he gave me your address and told me that if anything should ever happen [to] him to write to you and tell you that he had done his best for home and country and now, Mrs. Quihampton, it has fallen to my lot to send this this cruel news, but you must be brave and, besides, it was God's will so we must not complain, and there are thousands of other mothers who have to mourn the loss of their dear ones, but I can feel for you, Madam, because I lost my brother in the same charge and I have to send the cruel news to my dear mother, but you know when we enlist we know that we can't all go home again, some of us must give our lives. Your boy was my best chum and I know I will never get another friend like him in this world, he was in every sense of the word a pure man. There is a possibility of your son coming to light again, but I feel sure he was killed. I can give you no hope, so, dear Mrs. Quihampton, do be brave and don't cry; you son was a brave, good man.'
Biography at AIF including further letter to his mother

Photo of Richard Bassett Cockburn Raban
Lieutenant Colonel Richard Bassett Cockburn Raban
House: No 7, 1895 - 1898. Regiment: Royal Scots.
Died: 12 May 1916 aged 35 in France. Killed in action.
Cemetery: Vermelles British 111 F 22

Son of Rev. R. C. W. Raban, Bishop's Hull, Taunton, b. 1881.
Army III—I. School Prefect.
R.M.C. Sandhurst ; Somerset L.I. 1900 ; Indian Army (1st Bengal Lancers) 1901 ; Major 1915 ; Staff College, Quetta, 1914.
Great War (overseas), Lieut.-Colonel 13th Bn. Royal Scots.

Son of the late Rev. R. C. W. Raban (Vicar of Bishop's Hull, Taunton), and Mrs. Raban. Aide-de-Camp to the King at the Delhi Durbar.

The Times: "Lieutenant-Colonel Raban, 1st Duke of York's Own Lancers (Skinner's Horse), attached Royal Scots, was officially reported killed on May 12th. In connection with the great Durbar in Delhi in 1911, Captain Raban (as he then was) had the honour of being appointed one of the four Aides-de-Camp to the King-Emperor, and received the Durbar Medal. In 1914 he qualified for the English and Indian Staff Colleges, and passed into the Indian Staff College, Quetta. Shortly after the outbreak of the war, Captain Raban was selected to accompany a squadron of native troops to the front. In November last he was gazetted as second in command in the 7th Battalion Cameron Highlanders, with the rank of Major. In April he was made temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, and attached to the Royal Scots."

At 08.30 on 11th May 1916, the 13th Royal Scots took over the trenches opposite the Hohenzollern Redoubt at Loos, and at 16.15 the enemy opened a very heavy bombardment, and at 17.00 a shell entered the battalion HQ dug-out, killing or wounding the entire battalion HQ including Lieutenant Colonel Raban.
Details of 'Disaster at the kink'

Photo of Guy Benson Rathbone
Captain Guy Benson Rathbone
House: No 4, 1898 - 1902. Regiment: Gloucestershire Regt..
Died: 21 April 1916 aged 32 in Iraq. Killed in action.
Battle: Siege of Kut. Cemetery: Basra Memorial P 17

Son of A. B. Rathbone, Red Gables, Formby, Liverpool, b. 1884.
Lower V—VI. School Prefect. XXII Cricket; XL Football ; Shooting VIII.
Oriel College, Oxford; B.A. 1905. Played Golf for Oxford against Cambridge.
Formerly Schoolmaster; subsequently Actor.
Great War, enlisted 1914 ; Captain 11th Bn. attd. 7th Bn. Gloucestershire Regiment ; Despatches.

Married Theodora de Selincourt, 22nd October 1910.
Daughter: Pamela Joyce Rathbone, born 25th November 1912.
Address: 107 Haverstock Hill. NW.

'After a short time spent as a schoolmaster, he joined the Benson Company, and, making rapid progress as an actor, had played important parts on the London stage with marked success. In February 1915 he was given a commission in the 11th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment, becoming Lieutenant in August and Captain in November. Sent out to Gallipoli, he took part in the evacuation at Suvla Bay. He was reported as having been killed on April 21st. The curtain has fallen on an artist who gave promise of reaching a foremost place in his profession, but we think rather of the man who never lost his boyish charm of manner and character, and of the home which is bereft of a strong and lovable personality.' (Malvernian, Jun 1916).

Service record: WO 339/32752
Unit war diary: WO 95/5158/1

Photo of Alan Paddock Ravenscroft
2nd Lieut Alan Paddock Ravenscroft
House: No 6, 1906 - 1909. Regiment: Royal Field Artillery.
Died: 16 January 1917 aged 25 in United Kingdom. Accidentally killed flying in England.
Cemetery: Greenwich 3 C 7 16

Son of F. A. Ravenscroft, Hill Close, New Brighton, b. 1892.
Lower Shell—Science I. XL Football.
Rancher in the Argentine.
Great War, R.F.A. 1914, Lieutenant R.F.C.
Accidentally killed near Croydon, January 16, 1917.

'A boy of vigorous, fearless character, with a strong sense of humour, and withal, when occasion required, a deep seriousness of outlook. He was at his best when things were going worst. At the outbreak of war he was farming in the Argentine, but came home and received a commission in the R.F.A. He was at Suvla Bay until the evacuation, returned to Egypt with his regiment, and came to England last August. He transferred later to the R.F.C., and died on January 16th, as the result of an accident while flying in this country.' (Malvernian, Mar 1917).

Photo of Talbot Reed
Captain Talbot Reed
House: No 2, 1900 - 1904. Regiment: 67th Punjabis (I.A.).
Died: 12 March 1915 aged 29 in France. Killed in action near Neuve Chapelle.
Battle: Battle of Neuve Chapelle. Cemetery: Le Touret Memorial 1 A 20

Son of T. B. Reed, Broughenlea, Ballycastle, Ireland, b. 1886.
Upper V—Army I. House Scholar. House Prefect. House XI
Cricket and Football.
R.M.C. Sandhurst 1904 ; Dorset Regiment 1905 ; Indian Army
(67th Punjabis) 1906 ; Captain 1914.
Great War (overseas). Killed in action near Neuve Chapelle March 12, 1915 ; Despatches.

'He was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle on March 12th. A fellow officer writes: "The attack went in under very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, and all the British officers taking part in it were killed or wounded. Captain Reed was left the only officer with the regiment. He was wounded in the arm in advancing and was brought back under cover. He insisted on leading the men again, and got into the trench which was his objective, and was killed by a bullet in the heart as he got there. There is no doubt that he behaved with exceptional gallantry, and we must be very proud of him." ' (Malvernian, Apr 1915).

Photo of William Reeves Richards
Captain William Reeves Richards
House: No 8, 1904 - 1907. Regiment: Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Died: 15 August 1915 aged 24 in Turkey. Killed in action in Gallipoli.
Battle: Gallipoli Campaign. Cemetery: Green Hill Cemetery 11 B 22

Son of J. W. Richards, 7 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin, b. 1891.
Modern III—Matriculation Class.
Trinity College, Dublin; Gold Medal and First Place Final
Examination Law Society. Great War, Captain 6th Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Killed in action in Gallipoli, August 15, 1915 ; Despatches.

'At School he never took a very prominent position being of a retiring nature, but he was all the time laying in a store of character which asserted itself, when the time came, in a very remarkable way.
As an officer he showed quite unusual promise, and won the affection and respect of officers and men alike. His Commanding Officer writes: "The regiment in conjunction with some Munsters had just made a brilliant charge and captured the position. When on it, I asked your son to take some men along the ridge and make good the eastern end of it. Just as they were doing so a bomb was hurled over the crest hitting your poor boy on the head. He died instantly. To me personally your son is a terrible loss. He had been Adjutant for several months and right well he did his work. No boy could have done more." ' (Malvernian, Nov 1915).

Photo of Evan John Richardson
Lieutenant Evan John Richardson
House: No 1, 1903 - 1905. Regiment: Yorkshire Regt..
Died: 25 September 1915 aged 27 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Battle of Loos. Cemetery: Loos Memorial P 44/45

Born: Jan 9th 1888. Son of J. Richardson, 94 Sydney Place, Bath and Sneaton Hall, Whitby.
Army IV—II.
Yorkshire Regt. 1908; Lieutenant 1911.
Great War, 2nd Bn. Yorkshire Regiment.

'It was reported that a few Germans were actually in the Quarry and a bombing section under Lt Hill was despatched to deal with them. Lt Hill was almost at once reported shot and the company then, still believing, the enemy could be but few in number, sent Lt Brooksbanks platoon to clear them out. However a message soon came back from the platoon to say that there must be quite 50 of the enemy in the place & that Lt Brooksbank had been wounded.
D Coy under Capt Richardson was just about to withdraw & was ordered to clear the Quarry with B Coy to support it. Capt Richardson was mortally wounded as he rose to move.' (Unit War diary)

'Informant states that on Sept 26th 1915 at Loos, about 2 o'clock am, orders were given to fix bayonets, and to proceed down the 1st Quarry from the British Lines at Loos in order to clear them, and whilst in the quarries informant was in close proximity to Captain Richardson, and heard him fall and make exclamation in agony. Informant reports that Captain Richardson was shot. The trenches were afterwards retaken by the enemy and informant saw no more of the body, being injured himself.' (Reference: Sergt I Sales. 6392, 2/19 Yorks Regt, D Co., Lily Lane Hospital, Manchester, October 27th 1915)
Commemorated at St. Mary's Church, Whitby

Service record: WO 339/7013
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1659/4

Photo of Raymond Driver Richardson
2nd Lieut Raymond Driver Richardson
House: No 4, 1911 - 1916. Regiment: Grenadier Guards.
Died: 26 April 1918 aged 20 in France. Died of wounds in France.
Cemetery: Ebblinghem Mil 1 B 22

Born: Feb 17th 1898. Son of Stansfield and M. Anita Richardson, Thornholme, Sunderland.
Upper V—Science Form. Minor Scholar. School Prefect.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant Tank Corps; transf. 4th Bn. Grenadier Guards

'Many Malvernian friends will deplore the death of Raymond Richardson, who succumbed on April 26th to severe wounds received in action on April 20th. On leaving school he would, under normal conditions, have proceeded to Cambridge, but in July 1916 he entered a Training Battalion, and was gazetted to the Tank Corps in the following December. In July, last year, he was transferred to the Grenadier Guards, and went to France in December.
He was a thoughtful boy, with a lively and engaging manner, a personality who would have to be reckoned with in any community. His opinions, firmly held, were expressed fearlessly, and always with the utmost good temper. With his interest in scientific developments and in modern industrial conditions, and with sympathies quickened by the struggle in which he was to lay down his life, he bade fair, had he survived, to prove a worthy successor to his father in a career dedicated to social service.' (Malvernian, Jun 1918).

He was wounded on 22nd April 1918 and died four days later at a casualty clearing station half way between St Omer and Hazebrouck known as Ebblinghem.

'Le Tir Anglais. 20th April (Saturday). Battalion formed working parties. 2/Lt Richardson severely wounded. This officer subsequently died of wounds on the 25th April.' (Unit Way Diary)

Service record: WO 339/137979
Unit War Diary: WO 95/1226/2

Photo of Clement Ridley-Shield
Captain Clement Ridley-Shield
House: No 9, 1901 - 1903. Regiment: Highland Light Infantry.
Died: 17 October 1916 aged 29 in France. Killed in action at Beaumont Hamel.
Battle: Battle of the Somme. Cemetery: Louvencourt Mil Cemetery P1 RD G 14

Born 30th March 1887. Son of Joseph Ridley Shield and Mary Octavia Shield, Cardew, Alresford.
Lower V—Middle V.
Solicitor with Pugh & Co., Calcutta.
Great War, 2nd Lieutenant 1914. 4th Bn. Highland Light Infantry attd. 51st Division H.Q. Staff; afterwards Staff Captain. M.C.

The Times: "He obtained a commission in the Highland Light Infantry in September 1914, was afterwards appointed Staff Captain, and went through the fighting at Ypres, and was sent to the Staff College in France. On leaving that he was appointed to a Divisional Staff. He was mentioned in despatches in 1915, and was afterwards awarded the Military Cross, He was killed on October 7th." His contemporaries at Malvern will read this record with pride. He threw himself heart and soul into his soldier life, and his General saw in him great abilities which combined with intense application and modesty would have carried him far. (Malvernian, Nov 1916).

Service record: WO 339/20657

Photo of George Harold Riley
Captain George Harold Riley
House: No 3, 1906 - 1908. Regiment: Army Service Corps.
Died: 21 August 1918 aged 27 in France. Killed in action.
Battle: Hundred Days Allied Offensive. Cemetery: